(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Dutch Buffalo Creek Meeting House, 1745-1806"

Illllljiijlpiiiiljlillll: 

Ijilliiiiliiili 



im 



^iiiit!) 



iiiiliiliiiiiiiiiii 



ill 




'''''■^ifyMi^'^-y 






El) (HIICH OF ( 



liiliiiiiiili 



mm 






:i|||i|iiil||yi 



SffiiiSffl; 



ERRATA 

PART I. Page 38, line 21 - Jacob Boger born Oct. 12 

Page 44, line 19 - Christopher Lyerly Jr. 

Paoe 99, line 17 - Barrier, Cora Belie was unmarried, 
not wife of John Dave. See page 103, line 3. 

Chapter XIV was prepared in its entirety by 
Bernard W. Cruse. 

PART II. Page 52— Rev. Merle Sollinger 

Page 67 — Brotherhood picture - Rev. Thomas Hoffman 

Page 83 — Rowland Family - wife, Dona 

Page 87 — Adolphus Crooks Lentz Family - 
Roy Harold Lentz 

Page 88 — Green Sides Family - Gatha Lee 

Page 89 — Charlie P. Fisher Family - Charlie Theophilus 
Fisher 

Page 93 — William Barringer Family - Mae between par- 
ents. Third from L. back ro^v, Mauda Alice. 

Page 100 — Horace Barrier Family - Ray Barrier, not 

Moose. Freda Mabel Wagner, d. 1939, was wife 
of Horace and Mother of children 

Page 101 — Crooks Hurlocker Family - Eltha Hahn Hur- 
locker, wife. Standing 4th from L., Merlie. 

Page 106 — ^Titus Barringer Family - name omitted, 
Evelyn, 6th on back row. 



Acknowledgment: 30 old and damaged photographs were restored and 
made usable by The Portrait Shop, Concord, N. C. 



THE LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 




THE COLLECTION OF 
NORTH CAROLINIANA 

ENDO\XED BY 

JOHN SPRUNT HILL 

CLASS OF 1889 



C284.1109 
B74d 



UNIVERSITY OF N.C. AT CHAPEL HILL 



00042722562 



FOR USE ONLY IN 
THE NORTH CAROLINA COLLECTION 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2012 with funding from 
e of Museum and Library Services, under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act, administered by the State Library of North Carolina, a division of Cultural Resources. 



http://ar chive, org/details/dutchbuffalocreeOObost 



Parti 

DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK 
MEETING HOUSE 

1745-1806 
Frank K. Bostian 
Bernard W. Cruse, II.B 

Part II 

BETHEL BEAR CREEK 
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST 

1806-1974 
Thomas L. Moose 
Reedy Jordan Moose 



Part I: 

DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK MEETING HOUSE 

1745-1806 

Frank K. Bostian 

Bernard W. Cruse, LL.B. 

Part II: 

BETHEL UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST 

1806-1974 

Thomas L. Moose 

Reedy Jordan Moose 



Copyright © 1974 by 

Bethel Bear Creek United Church of Christ 

Mount Pleasant, North Carolina 28124 



Printed by Rowan Business Forms 

Salisbury, North Carolina 

Manufactured in the United States of America 



THE EDITORS 




Part I: 
1745-1806 




Rev. Frank K. Bostian 

B. 4-30-1912 

China Grove, N. C, Rowan Co. 

A.B. Catawba College 

B.D. Lancaster Theo. Sem. 



Bernard \V. Cruse, LL.B. 

B. 8-20-1904 

Cabarrus County 

MPCI— Lenoir Rhyne 

College— "Wayne State Univ. 

Detroit College of Law 




>s€Rt ftiP*' 



Part II 
1806-1974 





^W^^W 



Thomas L. Moose 




Reedy Jordan Moose 


B. Sept. 10, 1906 




B. Dec. 9, 1907 


Concord, N. C, Cabarrus Co. 




Ro^vland, N. C, Robeson Co. 


Concord Public Schools 




Rowland Public School 


N. C. State College 




Meredith College— 
NCC\V-Pineland Col. 




iii 






fcB 



w 



o 


c« 


rt^ 




3 


Ol 


OJ 


O 


00 




ffi 


>- 






Q 










4—1 


bXD 


he 


qj 


r-i 


c 


(U 


.3 




S 


> 

'5b 






t/2 

G 






rt 


-i-j 


i-i-i 






3 


h 


6 




—^ 


3 


^ 


a; 


g 


u 


4-J 


O 




u 


3 


OJ 



^Q 



o o j::; 

■t; •— ' ^ 00 

ra r-i 



C/D ' ' 



GU « 

S_ 3 -^ Sh 

M 7; ^ 

^^ c ^ 

Q r^ "^^ S 

-f rt •-" 3 

3 w 3 O 

^ S - S 

^ =2 G (D 

3^ ^ ^ 

»— I ^ ■" 

-^^^ g 

^ G OJ Jh 

O X G CU 

^U £ a; 

^ _, c ii; 

OJ OJ '^ N 

.S -== -^ e 

•^ U . 

>^-3 cs ^ 

(H G oj _j 

b t: PQ "^ 




o 



X - 



i4 ■= 



< J 

o 



o e 






O 






FOREWORD 



DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK MEETING HOUSE 

Founded by or prior to 1745 on Dutch Buffalo Creek, in what was 
known as Bladen County, which had been formed from New Hanover 
County in 1734. Anson County was taken from Bladen County in 1749. 
Mecklenburg County was formed in 1762, taken from Anson. And 
Cabarrus County was formed in 1792, from Mecklenburg. 

This DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK MEETING HOUSE, or DUTCH 
BUFFALO CREEK CHURCH, as it was known by both names, was 
a union church, made up of German Reformed and German Lutheran 
Christians who settled in this area in increasing numbers early in the 
decade of 1740. 

Part I covers the earlv history of the DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK 
MEETING HOUSE. 

Part H deals with the history of the BETHEL UNITED CHURCH 
OF CHRIST, Stanly County, originally BETHEL GERMAN RE- 
FORMED CHURCH, from 1806 to the present time, 1974. It was in 
1806 that the present Bethel Church was relocated and established in 
the area where it now stands, with its previous history unknown, or 
completely overlooked. 

From this original DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK MEETING 
HOUSE, or CHURCH, there came two congregations, BETHEL 
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST, as mentioned, and the ST. 
JOHN'S EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH, Cabarrus 
County, North Carolina. 

Part I: 
Frank K. Bostian, RED #3, Box 56, Concord, N. C. 28025 

Bernard W. Cruse, LL.B., 49 Academy Ave., N.W., Concord, N. C. 
28025 

Part II: 
Thomas L. Moose, RED #1 Box 314, Mount Pleasant, N. C. 28124 
Reedy Jordan Moose 



Copyright, 1974, by Bethel United Church of Christ, 

Mount Pleasant, North Carolina 28124. 

August, 1974 



CONTENTS 

DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK CHURCH 

Page 
FORE^VARD VI 

PREFACE IX. X 

ACKXO\VLEDGEMEXTS XI 

CHAPTERS 

Chapter I THE DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK CHURCH 1 

Chapter II OUR FOREFATHERS CARRIED 

RECO.\L\lEXDAFIOXS TO THE CHURCH 11 

Chapter III GERMAN' REFORMED AXD LUTHEIL\X 

FAMILIES COME TO X'lRGIXIA 13 

Chapter IV GERMAX REFORMED CHURCHES ARE 

IX SOUTH CAROLIXA 17 

Chapter V BETHEL GERMAX REFORMED CHURCH 

BEGIXS AXEW IX 1 806-1 X REALITY A 
CEIAXGE OF XAME AXD RELOCATIOX 22 

Chapter VI THE COXSTITUTIOX OF ST. JOHN'S 

E\'AXGELICAL LUTHERAX CHURCH 
SPEAKS OF THE DUTCH BUFFALO 
CREEK AXD THE GERMAX REFORMED 
CHURCH 25 

Chapter VII MEMBERS OF THE DUTCH 

BUFFALO CREEK CHURCH 27 

Chapter VIII THE DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK 

CHURCH XAME LIXGERS 28 

Chapter IX MOXUMEXT AT THE OLD CHURCH SITE 29 

Chapter X SOME FAMILIES WHO WERE MEMBERS 

OF DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK CHURCH 32 

Chapter XI GEORGE BOGER ATTEXDS THE DUTCH 

BUFFALO CREEK SCHOOL-DIARY OF 
GEORGE BOGER AND GENEALOGICAL 
FAC I S OF HIS FAMILY 37 

Chapter XII SOME MINISTERS WHO SERVED THE 

DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK CHURCH 41 

vii 



CONTENTS 



Chapter XIII 
Chapter XIV 
Chapter XV 

Chapter XVI 

Chapter XVII 
Chapter XVIII 



MEMBERS OF DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK 
CHURCH WERE DEVOTED TO EACH 
OTHER 49 

}OHN PAUL BARRINGER IMMIGRATES 
TO DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK CHURCH 
AND FACTS ON HIS FAAHLY 51 

RECORD OF BIRTHS AND BAPTISMS, 
BETHEL GERMAN REFORMED CHURCH, 
1817-1883, FROM THE ORIGINAL 
GERMAN RECORDS 55 

RECORD OF BIRTHS AND BAPTISMS, 
BETHEL LUTHERAN CHURCH, 1837-1911, 
AND SIX MARRIAGE RECORDS 76, 97 

RECORDS FROM GRAVESTONES IN 
BETHEL CEMETERY FROM LSOH TO 1974 99 

LAND HOLDERS ALONG DUTCH 
BUFFALO CREEK PRIOR TO 1800 
REVOLUTIONARY WAR SOLDIERS 
FROM DAR INDEX 1966 



Bibliography 

Other Sources 

INDEX for Part I 

INDEX For Diary and Life of George Boger 

INDEX For Life of John Paul Barringer and Family 



123, 124 
126, 127 
127 
129 
137 
139 



PREFACE 

A\'hen I began a studv of our Bostian and Cress family histories, in 
1966, ne\er did I imagine that that ^vould lead to the discovery of facts 
about a church in ^\•hich both families were involved in earlier years, 
and which had been all but forgotten. 

The DUTCH BUFFALO CREFK CHURCH, or the DUTCH 

BUFFALO MEETING HOUSE-known bv either name, was possiblv 
the first German Reformed and German Lutheran church to be 
established in the Piedmont section of North Carolina. Facts indicate 
that it 'was established earlv in the decade of 1740. Not only Avas it 
possibh the first German Reformed and Lutheran congregation to be 
established in this area, but it was one of the first churches to be 
established h\ our ancestors as they settled here. 

Although it has been relocated and rebuilt several times, it ceased 
to be a union congregation after about thirty years. It has been in 
continuous existence since its beginning. It is the mother church from 
which two of our prominent congregations of today have come, namelv, 
Bethel German Reformed Church, Stanh C unity, (no^v of the United 
Church of Christ, and commonlv referred to as "Bear Creek"), and St. 
John's Evangelical Lutheran (diurch, Cabarrus County. 

My paternal grandmother was Charlotte E. \Ioose, daughter of 
Henry and Mary Eva Lingle Moose, and a granddaughter of Jacob 
and Barbara Bushard Moose. The records of the earh church, and 
grave stones in the cemeteries, indicate that the Moose familv has been 
a large and important part of both congregations all through the \ears, 
both when a union congregation and also Avhen it ■was made into a 
Reformed and a Lutheran fellowship. 

My great, great, great, great grandfather, on my mother's side, -was 
Johann Nicolaus Heinrich Kress, and his name is on the roll as a 
member of the Dutch Buffalo Creek Church. Many of the Kress family, 
(spelled Cress in this area of North Carolina) are buried in the St. 
John's cemetery. However, one wonders if he did not become a part 
of the union church as a member of the German Reformed Church, 
because, in the KRESS FAMILY HISTORY, page 250, we read that 
"All the Kresses at Steinau belonged to the Reformed Church without 
exception." If he was a German Reformed by background, he chose 
to remain ^vith St. John's when it became a separate congregation. This 
illustrates again that these folk were not too much concerned about 
the particular church to which they belonged. They 'were sure that thev 
belonged to one, and were satisfied in either. They lived near one 
another, inter-mingled, inter-married, and went to church together— 
truly ^vere brothers in Christ. 

ix 



We note in the record, also, that Sarah Bostian, born June 12, 1798, 
and baptized July 22, was the daughter of Jonas Bostian and Magda- 
lene. The sponsor was Christian Kuhn. Jonas Bostian was a brother of 
my great, great, great grandfather. 

Named as co-author of this historical study is Bernard W. Cruse. 
While the actual work has been mine, he suggested areas of study 
where historical data was to be found, and permitted the use of his 
personal library, genealogical records, etc., from which much of this 
information has been secured. He also spent hours talking over the 
data, verifying the facts as they were considered, and offering invalu- 
able assistance. The record could not have been found without his 
gracious assistance. He has a personal, family interest in this old church, 
too. 

His maternal great-grandmother, Esther Eudy, daughter of Jacob 
Eudy, born Sept. 11, 1824, baptized at "Bear Creek" Feb. 27, 1825, was 
a member of Bethel German Reformed Church. While she became a 
member of the Lutheran Church with her husband, Peter Troutman, 
in, she retained a deep affection for her German Reformed heritage. 
Their son, Adam Troutman, married Alice Cress, who was his grand- 
mother. 

Since we have ancestors who were a part of this Dutch Buffalo Creek 
Chvnch, the study of this, the oldest of our congregations in this area, 
has been most rewarding. 

October 22, 1973 Frank K. Bostian 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

While the sources of our historical data are given throughout the 
book, where possible, we ^\•ant to recognize and express appreciation 
lor the most \aluable assistance which several friends have given, so 
graciously and ^\•illingly, and \\ith.out which, this could never have been 
written. 

Dr. Bachman S. Bro\vn, D.D., a member of the (Committee on History 
of the Lutheran S\nod of North (Carolina, and one of the three editors 
of the book. "A History of the Lutheran (diinch in North Carolina," 
by Jacob L. Morgan, D.D., Bachman S. Brown, Jr., D.D., and John 
Hall, D.D., read the original manuscript, took time to discuss it, made 
heljjful suggestions, and agreed that the facts herein presented are 
historically accmate as far as his knowledge goes. 

Bernard \\\ (^ruse, Sr., attorney, genealogist and historian, has 
served on the Committee on History of the Lutheran Synod of North 
Carolina for twenty-five years, has been active in genealogical and 
historical research all his life, and is well acquainted with the early 
da\s of the Reformetl and Lutheran congregations of North C^arolina. 
He most generously shared his wide knowledge in this area, suggested 
sources of information -which -woidd be helpful in oin~ quest for 
knowledge and ■which led to other sources of data ^\■hich have been 
most valuable. Without his help and continuing interest, and his Con- 
cern over sharing with the good folk of otn~ Bethel German Reformed 
C>hurch the true history of their congregation, this book wotdd never 
ha\e been written. 

Dr. Banks J. Peeler, D.D., editor of "A Story of the Southern Synod 
of the Evangelical and Reformed Church," and well acquainted with 
the early history of the Reformed and Lutheran Church in North 
Carolina, read the several manuscripts, in discussion and letters made 
helpful suggestions, and listed historical events and dates which were 
helpful in determining the approximate date for the beginning of this 
old, historic chinch. 

Names and dates on gravestones in the Bethel German Reformed 
Church cemetery, from 1806 until the present, are also included. These 
names and dates were copied by Carl T. Moose, Concord, N. C, July 
15 and 16, 1966, who kindly shared them. ^Ve have arranged them in 
alphabetical order. 

Since July, 1966, names and dates have been provided through the 
courtesy of Mrs. Holly Lentz, nee Bessie Allman, a life-long member of 
Bethel Church and a college class-mate of the author. 

To these friends, and others who have helped in any way in sharing 
their knowledge and interest, and in giving encouragement, we are 
glad to express great appreciation. 



THE DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK CHURCH 



The original German Reformed Church, (now a part of the United 
Church of Christ), was one of the earhest to be established in Virginia, 
South Carolina, and the Piedmont section of North Carolina. The 
historical records of the churches and schools which it established prove 
it was here at an early date. 

We are concerned with the DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK CHURCH, 
or DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK MEETING HOUSE, which began 
in Bladen County, North Carolina, in the early 1740's. Bladen County 
was formed from New Hanover County in 1734. Anson County was 
taken from New Hanover County in 1749. Mecklenburg was formed 
in 1762, taken from Anson. Cabarrus C^ounty was formed in 1792, from 
Mecklenburg. 

This congregation eventually became our Bethel German Reformed 
Church, (now United Church of Christ), and the St. John's Evangelical 
Lutheran Church, Cabarrus County, near Mount Pleasant. Originally, 
the DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK CHURCH was a union congrega- 
tion, of both the German Reformed and the German Lutheran 
members. , 

Tradition says that the nucleus of members of the Bethel German 
Reformed Church, established in 1806, came from the Lower Stone 
German Reformed Church, near Rockwell. However, not one of the 
names on the membership list of the Bethel congregation can be found 
on. the original rolls of the Lower Stone church. Therefore, these folk 
had to have come from some other location. 

An examination of the membership list of the original Dutch Buffalo 
Creek Church reveals that every one of them is listed as members of 
that older congregation. The records reveal that the DUTCH BUF- 
FALO CREEK CHURCH was established by our forefathers who 
came into this Piedmont section of North Carolina in increasing num- 
bers in the 1740's. Some of them brought with them letters of recom- 
mendation from their church and pastor in Germany, recommending 
them to the church and community in this new world where they were 
coming to live. The fact of this historic congregation is known through 
documents, references, deeds, a monument erected on the site of the 
first church in 1894, and through the genealogical records of some of 
the earliest families who were a part of the church. 

We are glad that our interest in family research led us to Bernard 
W. Cruse, and that he shared his wide knowledge of the early history 
of the DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK CONGREGATION, along with 
other genealogical and historical data. It is a privilege to make this 
summary of our findings on this historic church, so that others may 
know of the long, rich history of which we are heirs. 

1 



Regrettably, our forefathers did not keep a diary which would have 
given us a record of their church life. From such a source we would 
have known the earh history of the congregations they established. As 
Dr. Bachman S. Bro^vn, Jr., member of the Committee on History of 
the North (Carolina Sxnod of the Lutheran C^hurch, said, "They -were 
so busy making history that the)' ^vere not concerned with recording 
it." However, we are ghid that some of their records have come into 
our hands and provide valuable information about our ancestors and 
the church. 

Going back a couple of centuries, we remember that most of our 
ancestors came to this new land from Germany. Had a traveler from 
Pennsyhania in 1800-1850 visited portions of the present counties of 
Alamance, Guilford, Da\idson, Rowan, Cabarrus, Stanly, Iredell, Ca- 
tawba, Mecklenburg and Lincoln, he might have thotight that he had 
come upon a section of the old Keystone State. He would have heard 
the familiar sounds of the peculiar dialect of the Pennsylvania German 
language, kno^vn as "Penns)hania Deitsch", a combination of Rhine- 
area dialects and English \vords. This ^vould have indicated that many 
of their forefathers -were some of the Protestant refugees who had fled 
from the persecutions of Louis XIV, King of France, and who came to 
America under the kind and fostering care of Queen Anne of England. 
^\'hile my grandparents spoke "Dutch" around the hotise, the language 
in this area at present is almost extinct. 

If oiu" traveler attended church on Simday, he would have found the 
services conducted entirely in German. He woidd have discovered that 
both the German Reformed and the Lutheran people were worship- 
ping together. In almost every instance, the early churches were union 
congregations, with the German Reformed and Lutherans owning the 
property jointly, and each using it for its particular services on alter- 
nate dates, or on a mutually agreeable schedule. Some Reformed and 
Lutheran churches contmue today as union congregations. 

It is interesting to note that the history of both the German Re- 
formed and the Lutheran Church is so inter-twined and inter-related 
that one cannot -write the history of the one without at the same time 
enriching the history of the other. In those years, the people attended 
services whene\er or wherever they were held— it did not matter 
whether the service ^vas Reformed or Lutheran! They believed in God, 
and they went to church as a duty and privilege when a service was 
held. The fact that a service was being held was accepted as an invita- 
tion to come and share in it. They wanted to nourish their souls on 
the Bread of Life, the gospel truth, and they were glad to receive it 
from whichever pastor was proclaiming it that day. It was the Word of 
God, and they heard and heeded it thankfully. It is to their credit that 
they were so faithful and dedicated to their church, and to God. 

On the blank pages of many of the old German Bibles, placed there 
for a record of the family, listing of births, baptisms, weddings, deaths, 
etc., frequently we find the storv of the colonization of our ancestors. 



They came, first, to Pennsylvania, where the first settlers made their 
homes, in the early 170()"s; and they came in increasing numbers as the 
years went on. 

In Pennsyhania, many children were born. Within a few years, 
many of them migrated to North Carolina. The conclusion, then, is 
apparent, that the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania furnished North 
Carolina with most of her numerous German settlers, who located in 
the central and \vestern parts of the state. 

In the History of North Carolina, by \\^illiamson, we find the reason 
for this migration from Pennsylvania: "Land could not be obtained in 
Pennsylvania without much difficulty, for the proprietors of that 
Province purchased the soil by small parcels from the natives, and 
those lands were soon taken up." At that early period no one venttired 
to cross the Alleghany Moinitains for the purpose of settling there— so 
the seekers of new homes went south^v'ard instead of westward, and 
kept to the east of the Alleghanies, imtil they found unoccupied lands 
where they cotdd make their settlements. ^Villiamson also reminds us 
that "Lord Carteret's land in Carolina, where the soil was cheap, pre- 
sented a tempting residence to peojjle of every denomination. '"^i 

"The Germans from Penns\lvania arranged themselves on vacant 
lands to the eastward and westward of the Yadkin River, whilst the 
Scotch-Irish from the same Province, who had always lived on friendly 
terms ^vith their German i^eighbors in Pennsylvania, soon followed 
them southward, and occupied vacant lands mostly to the westward of 
the German settlers, along both sides of the Catawba River. There, 
again, Germans, and Scotch-Irish, at a later day, formed settlements of 
their descendants in the western part of the state. "^ 

The Pennsylvania Germans travelled in mtich the same manner as 
did the later colonists ■who went \\Y\st, and for the same reason— there 
was no other way to travel. There ■were no railroads, which later offered 
cheaper, easier and quicker transportation. They gathered every avail- 
able article for house and farm use, which could be stored in their 
capacious ■wagons, and took it with them. Of course they were forced to 
do this, for there were no stores, or shopping centers, where these 
essentials could be bought— and there were no indtistries to produce 
them. ^Vith the wagons loaded to capacity, the cavalcade moved on, 
with every able-bodied person on foot, and ■^vomen and children on 
bedding in the wagons. The livestock, cattle, hogs and sheep were 
driven before the wagon. They travelled by easy stages, on the roads 
of the picturesque Cumberland and Shenandoah Valleys, crossing the 
Blue Ridge Mountains in Virginia, until they reached the land of 



1. History of Xorth Carolina, Williamson, Vol. II, page 71. 

2. German Settlements and the Lutheran Church in Xorth Carolina, G. D. Bernheim. 
1872, page 142, Section 12, The German Settlers from Pennsylvania in Central 
Xorth Carolina, A. D. 1750. 



their hopes and promises. It reminds one of the children of Israel, in 
quest of their Promised Land. 

They arrived continuously for a number of years. Usually they would 
leave Pennsylvania in the early fall, after the harvesting was done and 
the proceeds of the year's labor could be sold. After several weeks of 
travel, they arrived at their places cf settlement before the winter had 
arrived in the south. The first pioneers must have arrived about 1745, 
or a few years before that, but the majority of these German colonists 
did not settle in North C>arolina luiiil about he year 1750. This may 
be inferred partly from tradition, partly from the family records in 
their German Bibles, but mostly from the title-deeds of their lands, 
which were always dated some years after their actual settlement. This 
delay in getting the deed to their land afforded them time to investi- 
gate other possibilities before deciding u]:)on a j^ermanent location. 
There was no risk of losing tlieir title-deed by the delay of a few years; 
there was plentv of land available for the settlers who were here. 

While the first arrivals of the pioneer I rain mav have occurred about 
1745, we can be sure that individuals had been exploring this area 
a decade or two earlier. Otherwise, how woidd they have known of this 
area toward which they started and where they planned to make their 
homes? Dr. Bernheim mentions that the settlers came down the valley 
from Danville, Va., probably about 1745.^ 

"The records also show that Heinrich Weidner (Henry Whitener) 
made his first trip to North Carolina on horseback sometime during 
the year 1742, and that he hunted fur-bearing animals in what is now 
known as Catawba County and westward. He is said to be the first 
white man to settle in that part of the state.""* 

Another early pioneer settler of the German heritage and also a part 
of the German Reformed Chinch was Johann Daniel Warlick, who 
arrived in Pennsylvania in 1748, and came to North Carolina Sept. 27, 
1750. He settled in Catawba County, where he was given a land grant 
of 5,000 acres, and shared in establishing our German Reformed 
Chinch there, along with \\^eidner and others. He died in 1772.^ 

It is interesting to know that a great, great, great grandson of this 
original Warlick settler. Rev. Charles W. W^arlick, D.D., was ordained 
a minister in the German Reformed Church in 1903, and served as 
pastor of this Bethel Reformed Church the years 1921-1929. 

Three sons of Dr. Warlick are active in the Reformed Church today, 
1974, now a part of the United Church of Christ. They are Frederick 
Warlick, First Church, Salisbury, N. C, and two of his children are 



3. History of the German Settlements and of the Lutheran Church in North and 
South Carolina, 1872, G. D. Bernheim. 

4. A Brief History of the Family of The Rev. Pinkney Alexander AVhitener, by 
Russell Picnkney Whitener, Sr. 

5. "Biography of Warlick Family," Alfred C. Warlick, Gastonia. N. C. 



active in the same congregation, Addie W. Campbell and Daniel H. 
Warlick; Charles "W. Warlick, Jr., First Church, Charlotte; and Joe R. 
"Warlick, Trinity Church, Concord. 

"Governor Dobbs gives us perhaps the first definite reference to 
Germans in the Piedmont in his report to the British Board of Trade 
on August 24, 1755. He wrote, 'Besides these (Scotch-Irish) there are 
22 families of Germans or S^viss . . . since their settlement 7 or 8 years 
ago'. "6 This report confirms the settlement of the area by Germans 
around 1747, and earlier. Thev would not all have come in at one 
time, but would have come gradually, a family or two at a time, over 
the several preceding years. 

From Agent Matthew Rowan to the Board of Trade, London, June 
28, 1753, a report included, "In the vear 1746 I was up in the County 
that is now Anson, Oranee and Rowan Countvs, there was not then 
above 100 fi8:hting men; there is now at least 3.000 for the most part 
Irish Protestants and Germans and daylay increasing.'"^ 

We read again. "The Germans ivho came to North Carolina be- 
longed to three religious sects— Lutheran, Reformed, and Moravian 
. . . The Lutherans came to be the lareest reli^rious element in North 
Carolina, and the Reformed prroun also had considerable numbers, but 
the most sisfnificant and lareest of these t^ree sects in the first states of 
settlement was the Moravians. ("Winson-Salem area.) 

"About 17^5 there were a fe^v T-utherans along: the Vf-^-^v River, and 
perhaps as far west as present Catawba Countv. Bv 1750 there were 
German settlers in Ro-wan. and three vears later it was reported that 
there were at least 3.000 fightin? men in Anson, Oranee and Rowan 
Counties, 'for the most part Irish Protestants, and Germans, brave, 
industrious people.' "^ 

We have a date earlier than 1742 which indicates that Germans were 
in this area before thev arrived in increasing numbers about 1745 and 
thereafter. "On Februarv 16. 1737. in a eroup of petitions to the col- 
onv's Provincial Counril for land patents is found the entrv: 'Jacob 
Shives (ScheibeV 220 Gladen'. Scheibe is a German name, and Bladen 
Countv at the time included most of the present Piedmont, North 
Carolina.""'' 

"The three earliest pioneers to Cabarrus were a Barrineer, a Derr, 
and a Smith, with their families. This was probablv in the late 1740's. 
This Barrineer was the John Paul Barrinsrer who was to play a great 
part in the earlv historv of Cabarrus Countv. Barrineer cut trees on or 
near the homestead of Henry Propst, northeast of Mount Pleasant. 

6. Deutschland in Piedmont, North Carolina, Smith Barrier, Jr. 

7. Ibid. 

8. The History of a Southern State— North Carolina, Lefler and Newsome, 1954, 
pa^e 79. 

5. Deutschland in Piedmont. North Carolina, Smith Barrier, Jr. 



Soon after the Barringers moved to the Dutch Buffalo Creek section at 
the south east tip of present Cabarrus County, Barringer applied for 
his land grant in 1753, but was not granted it until 1764. Like many 
others, he was a squatter. "^ (This illustrates that the application for 
land-grant often ante-dates the granting of the deed by ten or more 
years, but sometimes less.) 

Again, the Colonial Records indicate that German settlers were in 
this area in considerable numbers in the 1740's. "The Mount Zion 
Church is about ten miles south of Salisbury, on the line of the North 
Carolina Railroad, near China Grove station. This was, in its founda- 
tion, known as "Savitz" Church, which was a union church, the joint 
property of the Reformed and Lutheran people. When the church was 
organized, and by whom, we have no records to show. No doubt a place 
of worship was established here long before a regular minister was 
attainable, and an organization followed in the time of Suther or 
Loretz about 1760. Already in 1745-1750 all this region was peopled 
by the flood of immigrants from Pennsylvania, as was that on Dutch 
Buffalo and Second Creeks.'"^ 

The last sentence indicates that arrivals had been numerous in 
preceding years, and shows that our German ancestors were very early 
in coming into the Piedmont area of North Carolina for their perma- 
nent homes. 

A genealogical study of John Paul Barringer and his family, pre- 
pared by Bernard W. Cruse, Sr., appears in this book later, and shows 
that he came to a settled area on Buffalo Creek by 1753 or before. 

Among historians who have made a study of this area, we find gen- 
eral agreement that the Germans came into this Piedmont section of 
North Carolina in increasing numbers early in the 1740's. 

"The grand tide of immigration largely composed of Scotch-Irish, 
and many Germans, pouring from Europe into North Carolina, which 
had begun before the formation of Anson County, continued with an 
ever increasing volume, swollen by thousands from the Provinces to 
the north. The majority of these made their homes in middle or western 
North Carolina, as here was a vast, undeveloped country, with millions 
of acres of virgin soil, to be had almost for the asking. With the great 
increases of population, it soon became necessary, for the convenience 
of the inhabitants, to make new counties of Anson County's vast ter- 
ritory. The following counties were erected from portions of Anson: 
Rowan, 1753; Mecklenburg, 1762; Montgomery, 1778; Richmond, 
1779; part of Anson, East of Lumber River, added to Bladen in 1771 



6. Ibid. 

7. Colonial Records, VIII, page 748. 



(or 1777), and in 1843 another slice from Anson to help form Union 
County.''^ 

"However, the twenty to thirty thousand colonists who settled Cen- 
tral and Western North Carolina from 1740 to 1760, coming mostly 
from New England, represented many religious groups. Most of them 
were of such dissenting groups as Quaker, Baptist, Presbyterian, Lu- 
theran, Moravian, German Reformed and Methodist. "^ 

"John Lederer, according to Dr. Bernheim, was the first German to 
set foot on Carolina soil. In 1669-70 he travelled from the Colony of 
Virginia by way of the James River, through N. C, arriving at Old 
Charleston, S. C., to Santee River. 

"New Berne was founded in 1710 by Swiss Christopher Von Graf- 
fenried.sa (Rhinelanders on the Yadkin," Carl Hammer, page 17.) 

"Saxe-Gotha, S. C. Township, was settled by Germans in 1737. (Bern- 
heim, page 126, German Settlements in the Carolinas.) Orangeburg, 
S. C, became a German Settlement in 1735. (Bernheim, page 99.)^^ 

"According to Dr. William W^elker, Rev. Christian Theus, a Swiss, 
began preaching in S. C. in 1739, and made intermitten visits to Ger- 
man Settlements from 1745-60. (Historic Sketch of the North Carolina 
Reformed Church, Clapp, page 26.)9c 

"Heinrich Weidner (Henry Whitener) came along several years in 
advance of the rest of the German migration, hunting and trapping on 
the Cata-wba River at Sherrill's Ford (at least five years). If we take the 
date of 1745, when the migration really began to move fast, and deduct 
the five years spent by Mr. Weidner, we come up with the winter of 
1739-1740. At the end of these five years, winters and summers, Mr. 
Weidner married 16 year old Mary Mull, and arranged for land on the 
South Fork in what is now Catawba County. (Clapp, pages 243-244)9*^ 

"Now we come to the German settlers in Rowan and Cabarrus Coun- 
ties. 'Grace, commonly known as Lower Stone, near Rockwell, is one 
of the oldest churches in central North Carolina. It is of the German 
Reformed tradition, whose date of organization is unknown, but gen- 
erally accepted as having occurred sometime in the year 1745 ... It 



8. The Colonial History of Anson County, by W. K. Boggan. (Anson County fonned 
from Bladen County Sept. 29, 1748.) (Copied from personal papers of W. K. 
Boggan, on file in office of Anson County's Clerk of Superior Court, page 5, 
although the pages are not numbered.) 

9. Saints and Sinners at Jersey Settlement, The Story of Jersey Baptist Church, by 
Garland A. Hendricks, Copyright 1964. 

9a. "Rhinelanders On the Yadkin," Carl Hammer, page 17. 

9b. "German Settlements in the Carolinas," G. D. Bernheim, page 99. 

9c. "Historic Sketch of the Reformed Church in North Carolina," J. C. Clapp, page 

126. 
9d. "Historic Sketch of the Reformed Church in North Carolii.a," J. C. Clapp, pages 

243, 244. 



was founded by German settlers who came mto this area from Penn- 
sylvania during the period of 1739-1760 . . . Most of them were of the 
Reformed and Lutheran faiths . . . First accounts of such assemblies, 
either in a community meeting house or homes of interested people, 
have been verbally handed down from generation to generation, and 
begins with a settlement in the vicinity of St. Peter's Lutheran Church. 
Here, marked by a monument, the first house of worship was erected 
about the year 1740. (The building was owned jointly by Lutheran and 
Reformed people. Just when the house was built, we have no positive 
information, nor do we know how many years they occupied it. The 
ground upon which it stood was never deeded to either Church, and 
hence, when it became necessary to make a change, they both aban- 
doned it, and it was used no more by either. (History of the Evangelical 
Lutheran Synod and Ministerium of North Carolina, 1902, p. 119, 
G. D. Bernheim.) ... It is clear that they did move on south locating 
on the Little Buffalo, The Dutch Buffalo, Bear Creek, Cold Water and 
Second Creek. 

"This information says a lot of things to me, among them being: 

1. German and Swiss settlers were in the area of N. C. before 1745, 
perhaps before even settlements were begun. Illustration, Henry Weid- 
ner's experience on the Catawba River at Sherrill's Ford. 

2. When a sufficient number of German and Swiss families came to- 
gether, they always found time to gather for worship and religious 
instruction. 

3. There is reason to believe that the Dutch Buffalo congregation 
which once served Reformed and Lutheran families, is probably as 
old as the Meeting House erected by the settlers near St. Peter's Church. 
If this can be established, I believe the Dutch Buffalo congregation 
and Church is probably as old as the Meeting House, beginning shortly 
after 1740. 

4. At least the major portion of the Bear Creek congregation originally 
came from the Dutch Buffalo Creek Church. "^^ 

Now let us return to the early settlement of our forefathers, in the 
Dutch Buffalo Creek area. They brought with them from their home- 
lands their Bibles, their Catechisms, their hymnals and their Christian 
faith. These were just as important to them as household and farming 
utensils, which were absolutely essential for their survival. Although 
space on their ships was limited, they were sure that they brought these 
essentials of their Christian faith with them. 

It is to their credit that they proceeded at once to bviild a church and 
school building as soon as they were established in their crude, primi- 



10. From a personal letter of Nov. 29, 1972, from Banks J. Peeler, who made an 
intensive, thorough study of this area and period in preparing the book, "A 
Story of Southern Synod, of the Evangelical and Reformed Church," and from 
that book, pages 269 and 270. 

8 



tive homes. They believed in teaching their children the fundamentals 
of the Christian faith, and also providing a basic education in reading, 
writing and arithmetic, and also a kno'^vledge of the Bible. They gave 
careful attention to discharging their responsibilities as parents and 
citizens. 

One of the earliest congregations to be established in the Piedmont 
section of this area of North Carolina is this DUTCH BUFFALO 
CREEK CHURCH. To some today, this may sound like a strange 
name, of which they have never heard. But, as Ave have said, from this 
old congregation came two of the oldest congregations of the Re- 
formed and Lutheran denominations in this area— namely. Bethel 
German Reformed, now^ United Church of Christ, Stanlv County, near 
Mount Pleasant, and St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church, Ca- 
barrus County, north of Mount Pleasant. 

It is possible that not manv members of Bethel Church realize that 
the history of their congregation goes back far beyond the date on the 
cornerstone of their present building, 1806. "The inference is that on 
or about the year 1806 a union congregation composed of Lutheran 
and Reformed families Tvas formed. For on March 21, 1806, the first 
church building was begun, which served these families for a period 
of sixty-nine )'ears. 'The tract of land on Avhich it Avas erected, con- 
sisting of 110 acres, Avas sold to the t^vo cono;re^ations bv Christopher 
Lverly and his son, Jacob Lverlv, and -was deeded to Henry Smith and 
his successors in office July 2, 1809.' "^^ 

The existence of an earlier congregation can be inferred from the 
record of the congregation as recorded in the book from Avhich we 
have just quoted: "Occasional religious services were conducted in the 
area, mostly in the barns of Christopher Lverly and Matthias Barn- 
hardt, over a period of thirty or more vears prior to the appearance of 
the Reformed and Lutheran Church. "12 

"Such services included the preaching of the Gospel, performing the 
rites and administering the Sacraments of their faiths. The Rev. Samuel 
Suther, for instance, who Avas pastor of the nearest established Re- 
formed congregation, Grace, (Louver Stone), Church, on nearby Second 
Creek, Rowan County, from 1768 to 1786, and the Rev. Loretz, who 
followed him, could have performed these services. Prior to this time, 
Rev. James Martin and Rev. Richard Dupert were in the area, as -were 
Rev. Samuel Weyberg, and Rev. George Boger for a time after 1806."i3 

In his booklet, "A Historical Sketch of the Classis of North Caro- 
lina", Rev. George \Vm. ^V^elker, D.D., has this statement, "Before 
this time, however (1770) it was visited (reference is to the then called 
Klapp's Church) by Rev. Martin, a Swiss, in 1759, and by Dupert, in 



11. A Story of the Southern Synod. Banks J. Peeler, pages 159. 160. 

12. History of the Lutheran Church in North Carolina, Jacob L. Morgan, page 257. 

13. Op. Cit., A Story of the Southern Synod, page 159, 160. 



1764. Doubtless they visited all the children of our Reformed disper- 
sion as far west as Lincoln County at the same time.''^^ 

The family records of Andrew Smith indicate that services were held 
in people's homes, in their barns, under trees, any place where a group 
could gather. Services were held at Jacob Hagler's house when four 
children were baptized, March 3, 1799. The child of Andrew Smith 
was baptized. Christopher Lyerly and Andrew Schmidt were sponsors. 
Rev. Nicholas Marcard, pastor of St. John's, preached. "^^ 

Again we note a Lutheran pastor serving members of the Reformed 
congregation, as previously we have Reformed pastors serving the 
Lutheran people. The people wanted the Church and its ministry, and 
they eagerly accepted the ministrations of the minister available at 
that time. Hf'l 

In the chapter on George Boger you will note that his first wife was 
Elizabeth Hagler, no doubt from the home where services were held. 

We find the statement that German settlers were in this area before 
1740. "There were members of the Lutheran Church in the com- 
munity; but there were no Lutheran ministers anywhere in North 
Carolina in those early years. Rev. Adolph Nussman was the first 
Lutheran minister to become a settled pastor in this community, and 
in the state, and the year of his coming was 1773. But from 1739 there 
were Reformed ministers who officiated regularly to the scattered 
communities of settlers in this part of the State. In this particular 
community the Reformed Church was strong from the beginning of 
the first settlements, there being^ many Reformed families and many 
strong and active younsr men and women. They lived on Little Buffalo, 
Dutch Buffalo, Jenny Wolf and Dutch Second Creek, and were con- 
nected with this Church, though many of them lived at long distances 
from their beloved meeting house."is 

It is refreshing to read of the devotion of our forefathers to the 
Church and their Christian faith, at a time when bare phvsical ex- 
istence was a difficult iob. Their deep dedication to the Bible, and 
the truths they knew there, fortified them for the difficulties of the 
dav, and enabled them to beoueath to their posteritv a wonderful 
heritage, both in the country which they helped to establish and build, 
and in the Reformed and Lutheran Church which has meant so much 
to us. We are deeoly indebted to them for this DUTCH BUFFALO 
CREEK CHURCH, and other of our older congregations, from which 
many of our present congregations have come. We must take the torch 
from their hands, hold it high, keep it alight, and pass it on to gen- 
erations to come after us. 



14. A Historical Sketch of the Classis of North Carolina, Welker, pages 1, 2. 

15. Genealogical Records, Library of Bernard W. Cruse. 

16. History of the Southern Synod, Evangelical and Reformed Church, Jacob Calvin 
'Leonard, page 229. 

10 



OUR FOREFATHERS CARRIED 
RECOMMENDATIONS TO THE CHURCH. 



We know that our forefathers had a deep, meaningful faith. When 
they left their homeland for a new country, they came in confident 
certainty that God wovdd guide, sustain and help them. They brought 
their Bibles, catechisms and hymnals. They revealed their zeal for the 
church by the way in which they built one as soon as they were settled, 
and then by the way they attended the worship services whenever they 
were held. 

As an evidence of their concern for and interest in the church in this 
new land, America, many brought letters of recommendation from 
their home church and pastor to the new church in their new com- 
munity. We have a copy of a letter, written in German, recommending 
a man and wife, members of the German Reformed Church in Ger- 
many, "to all Ecclesiastical and secular authorities." The translation 
reads: 

'The bearer of this letter, John Michael Paulus, hitherto a member 
of our Congregation here at Essenheim, and his good wife, Catherine, 
both members of our Church, Reformed according to the Word of 
God, are willing, and have the intention, in the name of God, to 
undertake the journey to the American colonies, belonging to England, 
that they may find a more abundant livelihood. They are herewith 
recommended, upon their difficult and dangerous journey, to the pro- 
tection of the Almighty, the love of our faithful Saviour Jesus Christ 
and the communion of the Holy Spirit, to keep them in body and soul. 

"I recommend them faithfully to all Ecclesiastical and secular au- 
thorities, as well as to the Christian and Charitable consideration of 
every person. 

"Given at Essenheim in the Electoral Palatinate, near the City of 
Mayence, May 2, 1742. 

J. Radernher 
Pastor of the Reformed Church here."i 

Is it not reasonable to conclude that the bearer of this letter, and 
others who carried similar letters of recommendation, would be con- 
cerned about having a church home in this new land, and would 
become affiliated with one promptly? Unlike many today who delay 
changing their church affiliation until every other detail has been 
taken care of, they put this matter of church relationship as of first 
importance. 

Here is a translation of the passport which was carried from Germany 
and Switzerland by Mr. Andrew Loretz, German Reformed Church, 
dated September 8, 1784: 



1. Photostatic copy in possession of author. 

II 



"We, the Burgomaster and Council of the City of Chur (Choise) in 
the Canton of the Orisons, confess herewith that, through the grace of 
God, we enjoy at present in our city and neighboring places, a good, 
healthy and pure air that no dangerous plague or infectious disease 
prevails. 

"IN TESTIMONY WFIEREOF, the bearer of this, Mr. Andrew 
Loretz, a citizen here, and single, who intends to travel to Amsterdam, 
for purposes of business, has been given this certificate, provided with 
the seal of our chancery, so that he may pass and repass at all places, 
freely and unimpeded. 

"Given this 8th. day of September, 1784. 

Certified 
Seal 

Chancery of Chur."2 

"In the autumn of 1786 or 1787, Rev. Andrew Loretz came to Lincoln 
County, N. C. Here he made a home for himself four and a half miles 
from Lincolnton, from whence he never moved . . . He was pastor of 
the Lincoln County Reformed Church, but he for many years itiner- 
ated over the entire territory of North and South Carolina, as far as 
settled by members of the Reformed Church. To him, perhaps more 
than any one man, the existence of the Reformed Church in North 
Carolina is due."3 













2. Photostatic copy in hands of author. 

3. The Colonial Records of North Carolina, Saunders, Vol. VIII, page 747. 

12 



GERMAN REFORMED AND LUTHERAN 

FAMILIES COME TO VIRGINIA 



The authentic records connected with the beginnings and final 
consummation of the establishment of the first Reformed congregation 
in Virginia constitute one of the most interesting chapters in the his- 
tory of the Reformed Church in the United States (known as the 
German Reformed Church previously to World W^ar I), and it is 
doubtful if the beneficient influence radiating from any one of the 
early congregations can favorably compare with that Avhich emanated 
from it, and enriched the spiritual and material well-being of many 
sections of our great country. 

"Two men were immediately responsible for the coming of the first 
Reformed colony to Virginia. The first was Baron Christopher von 
Grafenried; the second, Alexander Spotswood, governor of Virginia. 
The latter was deeply interested in mines and the development of the 
iron industry. The former was an authority both on the subject of 
mines and the manufacture of iron. Following a conference with de 
Grafenried, Governor Spotswood requested him to correspond with 
expert miners in Europe, and, if possible, induce a small colony to 
come to Virginia, and take over the management of his proposed 
mining operations. The correspondence was opened with the miners 
of Nassau-Seigen, Germany, with the result that twelve heads of fam- 
ilies, forty-two persons in all, agreed to come to Virginia under the 
terms outlined in the correspondence. 

"Accordingly, in the year 1713, the colonists sailed for Virginia. And 
upon their arrival in 1714, were settled by Governor Spotswood on the 
Rapidan River in the northern corner of the present Orange County. 
Here they built their log cottages and fortified their small villages with 
palisades and a block house, which was also used as a place of worship. 
The village was named Germanna in honor of the Fatherland, and the 
'Good Queen Ann' of England. 

"Until recent years there has been considerable uncertainty about 
the names of the families composing the colony, but a few years ago 
there was discovered in a will book, among the records of Spotsylvania 
County, Va., a number of affidavits and court orders which have set 
the matter at rest.^ 

"At a court held for Spotsylvania County on Tuesday, the 7th. day 
of April, 1724, John Fishback in order to prove his right to take up 
land according to the royal charter made oath that he came into this 
colony to dwell in the year 1714 and that he had brought with him 
Agnes his wife, and this is the first time of proving their said im- 
portation, whereupon certificate is ordered to be granted him of right 
to take up one hundred acres of land. 

1. Will Book A, page 69, Spotsylvania County, Va., Office Register & Recorder. 

13 



"There are similar affidavits for: 
Herman Fishback and Kathrina his wife. 
Jacob Holtzeclaw and Margaret his wife, and John and Henry, his two 

sons. 
John Camper (Kemper) and Alice Kathrina his wife. 
John Joseph Martin and Mary Katrina his wife. 
John Spillman and Mary his wife. 
John Hoffman and Kathrina his wife. 
John Cuntz (Koons) and Katrina his wife, and his son John Annalis, 

(sic) and Kathrina his daughter. 
Jacob Rector and Elizabeth his wife and John his son. 
Melcherd Brumback and Elizabeth his wife. 
Dillman Weaver and Anna Weaver his mother. 
Peter Hitt and Elizabeth his wife. "" 

Rev. John Haeger and wife, Anna Catherine. 

"It is of interest to note that all of the members of the colony were 
neighbors in the Fatherland, and, all, or nearly all, were related. 

"No affidavit was made by the pastor of the congregation, the Rev. 
Henry Haeger. This omission has caused some of the late writers to 
conclude that he came into the colony later; others maintain, and with 
reasonable evidence, that he was with the colonists when they arrived 
at Germanna. We have added his and his wife's name to the above list, 
even though this addition raises the number of families to thirteen, 
whereas all writers and court records have fixed the number at twelve. 
If Mr. Haeger came into the colony later, he was certainly there on 
November 15, 1715, when he entertained John Fontaine in his home.2 

"The French Hugenot, John Fontaine, gives us, in his memoirs, a 
description of Germanna a year after it was founded. He writes that the 
town was surrounded by a palisade to protect it from the Indians. The 
palisade was in the shape of a pentagon, and in the center was a 
block-house, which the colonists used as a church. The houses were 
built in a row, with small sheds for chickens and hogs built about 
twenty feet away in front of each house, thus forming a sort of street. 
He states that on his visit to the village the Germans received him 
hospitably, and that he lodged with the minister. He also states that 
the colonists went to prayers in the block-house each day, and that 
they had two sermons on Sunday. The services were all German, and 
the colonists seemed very devout and sang the psalms well. 

"On March 1, 1715, eleven men of the colony went to work mining 
ore, and building a blast furnace, and HERE AT GERMANNA OUR 
REFORMED ANCESTORS SET UP THE FIRST IRON FUR- 
NACE IN AMERICA; MANUFACTURED THE FIRST PIG IRON; 



'. Memories of a Hugenot Family, page 207. 

14 



AND ESTABLISHED THE FIRST GERMAN REFORMED CON- 
GREGATION ON THE CONTINENT. "3 

A shaft of stone honoring the 1714 immigrants, erected temporarily 
on Route 3, was relocated at private expense at this permanent site in 
Seigen Forest. It bears this inscription:'* 

SITE OF THE FIRST 
GERMAN REFORMED CHURCH 

HERE AT GERMANNA 1714 THE FIRST PERMANENT 
GERMAN REFORMED CONGREGATION IN AMERICA 
LOCATED WITH THEIR PASTOR REV. HENRY 
HAEGER. THEY ^VERE A FAMILY OF THIRTEEN 
FAMILIES FROM NASSAU-SEIGEN. GERMAN^'. ^.VHO 
WERE WELCOMED TO VIRGINIA BY GOVERNOR 
SPOTS^VOOD AND AVHO AVERE SETTLED HERE TO 
DEVELOP HIS IRON INDUSTRY AND TO PROTECT 
THIS AREA OF THE FRONTIER. THEY FOUNDED 
GERMANTOAVN, FAUQUIER COUNTY, AND MOVED 
THERE ABOUT 1720. 

HEADS OF THE IMMIGRANT FAMILIES 

Melcherd Brumbach John Hoffman 

John Camper (Kemper) Jacob Holtzeclaiv 

John Coontz (Coons) John Joseph Martin 

Herman Fishback John Jacob Rector 

John Fishback John Spillman 

Peter Hitt (?) Dillman Weaver 

ERECTED 1953 BY THE 
EVANGELICAL AND REFORMED CHURCH 

This is irrefutable evidence that German Reformed families were 
settled in Virginia by 1714— and suggests the possibility that they may 
have been coming in North Carolina long before the organization date 
of the Dutch Buffalo Creek Church. 

As further evidence that the Reformed and Lutheran folk of Ger- 
many were closely related in their settlement and beginnings in this 
country, and in their church life, there is also a marker in the Ger- 
manna area with this inscription:-^ 



3. History of the Reformed Church in \'irginia, J. Silor Garrison, pages 21, 22, 23. 

4. The Memorial Foundation of the Germanna Colonies in Virginia, Inc. THE 
FIRST DECADE, 1956-1966, Charles Herbert Huffman, 1966, TFIE GERMANNA 
RECORD, No. 9, 1966, page 33. 

5. Ibid., THE GERMANNA RECORD, Number 9, 1966, page 32. 

15 



THIS MARKER HONORS 

THE MEMORY OF THE SECOND 

GERMANNA COLONY. 1717 

TWENTY GERMAN FAMILIES FROM THE UPPER 
RHINE VALLEY, MOSTLY LUTHERANS, SETTLED 
NEAR THIS SITE IN 1717 AND WERE PROMPTLY 
FOLLOWED BY OTHERS, SOME OF THEM INDEBTED 
TO GOVERNOR SPOTSWOOD FOR MONEY HE HAD 
ADVANCED FOR THEIR PASSAGE, DISCHARGED 
THE DEBT BY ASSISTING IN THE OPERATION OF 
HIS IRON MINES. ABOUT 1725 THEY REMOVED 
FARTHER UP TO LANDS ACQUIRED BY GRANT IN 
THE ROBINSON RIVER SECTION OF MADISON 
COUNTY. HERE NEAR MHITE OAK RUN IN 1740 
THEY BUILT HEBRON LUTHERAN CHURCH 
WHICH STILL STANDS A MONUMENT TO THEIR 
DEVOTION AND CHRISTIAN CHARACTER 

HEADS OF FAMILIES*6 

BALTHASER BLANKENBAKER MICHAEL KAIFER 
MATTHIAS BLANKENBAKER ANDREW KERKER 
NICHOLAS BLANKENBAKER GEORGE MOYER 
JOHN BROYLES JOHN MOTZ 

JOHN CARPENTER (1721) GEORGE SHEIBLE 

WILLIAM CARPENTER (1721) MATTHEW SMITH 
MICHAEL CLORE MICHAEL SMITH 

MICHAEL COOK HENRY SNYDER 

ZERECHIAS FLESHMAN GEORGE UTZ 

JOHN HARNSBERGER NICHOLAS YAGER 

MICHAEL HOLT CHRISTOPHER 

ZIMMERMAN 

ERECTED BY JAMES CARLTON CLORE IN 

HONOR OF HIS PARENTS MAY FRANCES 

YOWELL AND JAMES CLEVELAND CLORE, 

DESCENDANTS OF MICHAEL CLORE 

ERECTED IN 1961 

LUTHERAN COLONY AT GERMANNA: 

"A colony o£ German Lutherans, consisting of twenty families, 
arrived in Virginia in 1717, and were settled by Governor Spotswood 
near by the Germanna Village. They were without a minister, and 
Rev. Mr. Haeger, and the elders of the Reformed congregation, cor- 



6. Names copied from Marker and sent by R. B. Alexander, Mt. Crawford, Va. 

16 



dially invited them to worship in the block-house with them. The 
invitation was gratefully accepted, and harmonious relationships were 
maintained until the Reformed congregation moved to their new 
settlement where they established the village called Germantown. This 
arrangement marks the beginning of the harmonious relationship 
between the two denominations ^vhich later resulted in the building of 
union churches throughout the Shenandoah Valley, and other sections 
of Virginia during the pioneer days of their respective histories. "^ 

Later we refer to the Rev. John Casper Stover, a Lutheran pastor, 
who came from Germany to Philadelphia, arriving September 11, 1728. 
"He traveled to North Carolina where even at that early date there 
were a few Germans. Here he married, and in 1733 wandered up 
through Virginia to the settlement of the Hebron Lutheran— in the 
spring of 1734 his family was brought from North Carolina at the 
expense of the congregation.'"^ 

Hebron, near Madison, the oldest congregation in the Synod, wor- 
shipping in the oldest Lutheran Church in regular use in America, 
had its beginning ■with the landing of fwenty destitute families on the 
Virginia coast in 1717 . . . Though without a pastor until 1733, they 
were not unmindful of their spiritual interests. "While living at Ger- 
manna they worshipped in the block-house with other Germans (Re- 
formed), whose pastor was the Rev. John Haeger, and united with 
them in sending an agent to Europe with a petition to the 'Society for 
the Propogation of the Gospel to Foreign Parts', in London, for the 
support of a minister. "^ 

These historical references reveal again the very close relationship 
existing between the Reformed and the Lutheran people in the early 
days in America. For approximately a quarter of a century the Luther- 
ans had no pastors of their own faith, at least in Virginia and North 
Carolina. Their people shared in the ministry of the Reformed pastors 
and teachers. Members of these two churches were among the very first 
to settle in that area of Virginia and to establish churches. 



GERMAN REFORMED CHURCHES ARE IN 
SOUTH CAROLINA 

The German Reformed Church had i^ventv to thirty congregations 
very early in the settling of the State of South Carolina. 

We read of Reformed and Lutheran people in South Carolina in 
the early 1700's. "In the year 1737 a German colonv, called Saxe-Gotha, 
was settled along the upper course of the Congaree River, near the 



6. History of the Reformed Church in Virginia, J. Silor Garrison, page 24. 

7. A History— St. John's Lutheran Church, C. Lee Shipton. 

8. A Historv of the Lutlieran Church in \'irginia and East Tennessee, edited by 
C. W. Cassell, W. J. Fiiik and Elon O. Henkel, 1930, pages 184-185. 

17 



junction of the Broad and Saluda rivers. It was settled largely by the 
Swiss. As the Lutheran pastors kept up friendly relations with their 
Reformed neighbors, there are numerous important references to the 
Reformed pastors and congregations in South Carolina and Georgia 
. . . In 1741 the news of the erection of the new Township of Saxe- 
Gotha reached the Lutheran pastors at Ebenezer. They write, under 
date of December 2, 1741: 

'We had heard nothing before of Saxe-Gotha in America, but we 
have just received intelligence that such a town is laid out in South 
Carolina, 100 English miles (or 25 German miles) from Charles-Town, 
on the road which passes through Orangeburg, and is settled with 
German people. Doubtless the majority of them are Reformed people, 
because they have a Reformed minister among them, with whose 
character we are not yet acquainted.' This Reformed minister was the 
Rev. Christian Theus.''^ Fie was ordained in 1739, as we have stated 
'Trom 1739 he officiated as minister among the German Reformed 
settlers of South Carolina, "2 and the Lutherans. 

Mr. Theus was present ai a meeting in 1789. As this is the last time 
that his name is mentioned, it is assumed that he died shortly there- 
after. 

Mr. Theus had a fine education, and his learning and piety were 
highly spoken of. "Rev. Christian Theus was a great and good man, 
and was the first minister among the Swiss and Germans of Carolina. 
If there had been formed a "Coetus", covering the Carolinas and 
Georgia, in those early years, the Reformed Church v/ould now have a 
different story to write of its work and people in the South. A few 
faithful men, such as Theus, Froelich, Martin, Dupert, Suther, Pena- 
ger, Zubly, Schneider, Bithaln, Loretz, stood alone for years and did 
their work well. But in South Carolina and Georgia they had no 
successors. But the labors of Mr. Theus were not in vain. He fostered 
the weak German churches in North Carolina and held them together 
until permanent ministers came and located there. The Classis of 
North Carolina, does well, even at this late date, to pay tribute to Rev. 
Christian Theus, whose labors in those early years prepared the way 
for future success. "^ 

His last resting place is still pointed out in a field along the state 
road between Columbia and Sandy Run, about eight miles from Co- 
lumbia. Mr. Abraham Geiger erected a tombstone, at his own expense, 
to his memory. It bears the following inscription: 

"This stone points out where the remains of Rev. Christian Theus 
lie. This faithful divine labored throueh a lone life as a faithful 



1. Ministers of the German Reformed Congregations in Pennsylvania and Other 
Colonies in the Eighteenth Centui-y. Hinke, Pages 333-336. 

2. Ibid. Hinke. 

3. Historic Sketch of the Reformed Church in North Carolina, Board of Editors, 
Classis of North Carolina, 1908, Introduction by George W. Welker, pp 23-24. 

18 



servant of His Master's vineyard, and the reward which he received 
from many of his labors was ingratitude. "^ 

"The efforts of the Reformed Church in South Carolina lasted about 
a hundred years. They were predestined to failure almost from the 
start. Geography, the dangers of the frontier, disease, and the language 
barrier worked against the formation of settled religious communities. 
The areas opened by the colonial government to settlement by the 
German Swiss members of the Reformed faith were in the extreme 
southwest and south central sections of South Carolina— away from 
the tidewater and next to the Indian lands of the Cherokees. These 
areas stretching from the edge of the tidewater to the fall line had 
neither the ad^'antage of accessibility of the tidewater nor the healthful 
climate of the Piedmont. They were subject to Indian raids and the 
language of these settlers, being strange to their neighbors to the north 
and east, made them cling together in more or less segregated com- 
munities. 

"Beginning in 1732 perhaps as many as three hundred Swiss led by 
Jean Purry of Neuchatel, Switzerland, settled north of Savannah in 
Carolina at Purrysburg . . . Both Lutheran and German Reformed 
faiths were represented among the settlers. Gradually these Switzers 
were assimilated in spite of the language barrier. ^ 

"Ttvo hundrd and fifty Swiss had arrived in Julv, 1735. on the North 
Fork of the Edisto River, ninety of whom were able to bear arms. By 
1750 other Swiss settlers had arrived at this district, called Orangeburg, 
after William of Orans^e. John Ulric Gies'sf^ndanner, a (joldsmith, from 
Lichtensteig, Switzerland, had come in 1737 and preached in the open 
near his home every Simday. Children as old as nine vears of age were 
brought to be baptized and people came from fortv miles awav to hear 
him preach. At his death the Germans persuaded his nephe^v, John 
Giessendanner, to secure a license to preach, which he did bv Pres- 
byterian orders. His preaching was so satisfactorv that several years 
later the English in that and near-by communities 'prevailed with him 
to officiate in preaching once every fortnight in English which he hath 
since preformed very articulately and intelligibly .... Six years later 
Giessendanner Tvent to England to take Episcopal orders and then to 
Germanv and Sivitzerland ns an immigrant asrent. He returned shortly 
after bringing fifty copies in German of the Book of Common Praver 
and continued preaching in a church built by the Orangeburgers until 
his death in 1761.6 



4. Ibid, pp 25, 26. 

5. Robert Meri^vether. Expansion of South Carolina, 1729-1765, Southern Publishing 
Company. 1940, pp. 34-41. 

6. Robert Meriwether. Expansion of South Carolina, 1729-1765, Southern Publishing 
Company. 1940. pp. 34-41. 

Ibid. 42-50. Gilbert P. Voight. Swiss Notes on South Carolina. South Carolina 
Historical Magazine, vol. XXI, pp. 93-104. 

19 



"Nearby on the west bank of the Congaree, Amelia Township was 
laid out. A small community developed there in the 1740's and Gies- 
sendanner recorded frequent marriages and baptisms at the home of a 
Mrs. Russell. After 1757 he mentions meetings at Amelia Chapel.'^ 

"The Rev. John Joachim Zubly, the most brilliant of the Reformed 
ministers of the 18th. century, preached here before 1749. 

"On the upper Congaree River the Saxe Gotha settlement was 
started with twenty-nine families led by John Jacob Riemensperger, of 
Toggenburg, Switzerland, in 1737. Three years later this group signed 
a petition to the officers and citizens of Zurich asking for prayerbooks, 
Bibles and psalters. This petition taken there by Riemensperger 
showed that these settlers were nearly all of the Reformed faith, but 
it was rejected by the authorities and Riemensperger was ordered to 
leave. At the same time Christian Theus came from Switzerland and 
by 1739 began his service to these Germans which lasted until after the 
Revolution. 8 After his death, the congregations remained vacant for 
many years. Loretz, fiom North Carolina, served them four times a 
year to preach, baptize, confirm and administer the Lord's Supper.^ 

The Rev. Bartholomew Zouberbuhler and Johannes Tobler of 
Appenzell, Switzerland, led one hundred and ninetv-two persons to 
South Carolina under contract in 1737. . . . John Tobler used to read 
aloud to his Swiss neighbors extracts from German sermons and he 
begged the government for a school and pastor to put a stop to the 
ungodliness in the township. ^^ 

In order to serve these German settlements in the middle country, 
the Rev. John Gasser left Switzerland in 1752, finallv reaching Charles- 
ton in early 1754. He was given fifty acres near Crim's Creek next to 
the German settlements. Although a church was organized at once, the 
people were unable to support him and he soon returned to Swit- 
zerland. n 

"The Rev. Bennet was sent in 1832 to work among six congregations. 
He appealed to the Synod that 'they had had no pastor for twenty 
years and in one area there were thirty persons waiting to be con- 
firmed.' After his departure the congregations gradually disappeared 
and no remnant of the German Reformed faith is found there 
today."i2. 13 



7. Ibid. 50-51. Voight. Religious Conditions Among German-Speaking Settlers 

1732-1774. S. C. H. M., Voi. LVI, pp. 59-66. 

8. Ibid. pp. 52-65. 

9. James I. Good. History of the Reformed Church in the United States, Board of 
Publication of the Reformed Church. 1911. pp. 200-201. 

10. Meriwether. Expansion, pp. 66-76. 

11. Ibid. 

12. Good. History, p. 201. 

13. Barnhart, Eleanor Lyles, A History of the Reformed and Congregational Chxirches 
in South Carolina, Presented June 26, 1962, to the Historical Society of the 
Southern Synod of tlie Evangelical and Reformed Church. 

20 



"In a personal letter Mrs. Barnhart states, "In South Carolina most 
of the German or Swiss settlers entered the colony through Charleston 
before going to the central part of the states along the rivers. The 
Giessendanners from Switzerland settled at Orangeburg in 1735. They 
preached to Reformed, Lutherans and Presbyterians, in the homes of 
the members. . . . Since no support was sent to these struggling frontier 
oases, either from Europe or Pennsylvania, the congregations gradually 
merged with the Lutheran, or Methodist churches . . . The Amelia 
area was German. "i^ 

It is possible, and likely, that some of our ancestors came into the 
Dutch Buffalo Creek area from South Carolina, as well as from Penn- 
sylvnaia and Virginia. 

During the Revolutioanry War, a number of Hessian soldiers de- 
serted from the British Army at Savannah, after the siege of that place, 
and found their way to the German settlement on Dutch Buffalo 
Creek in'.ermarried -with these settlers, and were thus permanently 
loca.ed ilicie."^^ 

"However, one thing the British government had entirely over- 
looked, namely that numbers of the American citizens were German 
and German descendants, still bearing German names, possessed of 
German characteristics, and speaking the German language. No sooner 
did the Hessian soldiers come in contact with these German-American 
citizens, than they deserted the ranks of the British Army wherever 
they found an opportunity for so doing, and fled to German settle- 
ments, to be delivered from the dangers and hardships in which they 
had no interest. 

"In these settlements the identity of the Hessian deserters soon be- 
came lost to the British, and the German farmers were only too happy 
to have the Hessians in their midst as laborers ever to betray them to 
the British who were their own enemies as well as they were dangerous 
foes to the Hessian deserters. "^^ 

Thus it is evident that there were German Reformed Churches in 
South Carolina in 1735, at least groups who met for worship. One 
would assume that congregations and buildings would follow at once, 
since that was the practice in other areas. The Dutch Buffalo Creek 
Church area must have been settled, and the fact of its existence must 
have been generally known. Rev. Christian Theus, ordained in 1739, 
made his way to the Dutch Buffalo Creek Church area in the early 
years of its existence. 

The Hessian soldiers, deserting in a strange land, must have known 
about the Dutch Buffalo Creek settlement, for they came directly to 
the area and decided to stay and make their homes there. 

14. Letter from Mrs. Barnhart, Charleston, S. C, Nov. 2, 1972. 

15. "The Colonial Records," Sanders, Vol. VIII, page 760. 

16. "History of the German Settlements and of the Lutheran Church in North and 
South Carolina," G. D. Bernheim, pages 171, 172. 

21 



Since we know that we had German Reformed Churches in Virginia, 
and in South CaroHna, in these early years, it seems most unlikely that 
the Dutch Buffalo Creek settlement was without settlers at about the 
same time, and prior to the date of the organization of the congrega- 
tion. Surely individuals had come through the area, knew about it, 
and carried their recommendations about the settlement to the older, 
settled areas, in both Pennsylvania and in South Carolina. Otherwise, 
how would the peoj^le ha\e known of the place to come when they were 
seeking settlement in the Piedmont section of North Carolina? 

BETHEL GERMAN REFORMED CHURCH BEGINS 

ANEW IN 1806-IN REALITY A CHANGE 
OF NAME AND RELOCATION 

"Bethel, commonly known as 'Bear Creek', (originally 'Barren 
Creek'), is situated in the extreme western end of Stanly County. A 
German record, which bears no date, is translated as follows: 'Let this 
record show to everybody and particularly to those who have a right 
to know that we, born by the Grace of God in the Christian Church 
and some implanted in the same through baptism and confirmation 
in Europe and others in America, have settled here in North Carolina 
at the eastern end of Cabarrus County and western end of Montgomery 
County on the waters of Bear Creek and Buffalo Creek, and that we 
call ourselves Evangelical Lutheran and Evangelical Reformed, ac- 
cording to the faith of our ancestors. Since we agree on the leading 
points of Christian doctrine and no difference exists between us, ex- 
cept the outward name which God does not respect but only looks 
upon the purity of faith and pinpose of the heart among all people, 
and since those that fear Him, and do right are dear to Him, and since 
the Preserver and Benefactor of the whole human race not only wills 
that all His children prosper in earthly things but they also come to a 
knowledge of the truth and their souls shall be forever happy, the 
Shepherd and Bishop of our souls has sought us lost and scattered 
sheep in this hemisphere and has called and acknowledged us through 
His Word outwardly, and through His Spirit inwardly and has blessed 
us in spiritual things and has awakened in us the desire that we should 
like often to attend His holy Church services, and the place where His 
honor dwelleth, and that we should like to see our growing youth 
brought up in a Christian manner and instructed in true Christianity. "^ 

"Services were held in this community before any church was built. 
The nearest regularly organized congregation was that on Second 
Creek, in Rowan County. Here Rev. Samuel Suther had preached 18 
years, from 1768 to 1786. And prior to that time, Leinbach, Martin 
and Dupert had held services. Some or all of these men held occasional 



1. Historic Sketch of the Reformed Church in North Carolina, George W. Welker, 
pages 215, 216. 

22 



service, if not stated ones wherever German settlements were found, 
and the Bear Creek settlement was not overlooked. Rev. Andrew Loretz 
came to the Second Creek Church in 1789, and no doubt preached also 
at Bear Creek, as did \Veyberg and Boger, also. Theophilus Lefler, 
(Loetter, Loeffler), a German school teacher who taught near the site 
of the present church, sometimes held services for the people. He was 
in the community as early as 1797, and was a highlv educated man. He 
was the first person buried in the cemetery, and the grave is marked. 
Services were held in Christopher Lyerly's barn and the Mathias 
Earnhardt barn. "2 

The histories of the Southern Synod by both Dr. J. C. Leonard and 
Dr. Banks J. Peeler suggest that services were held in the years before 
the beginning of the Bethel congregation in 1806, but the name, the 
DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK CHURCH, or MEETING HOUSE, is 
not specifically named in their books. 

The tradition has persisted through the years that Bethel Church is 
an outgrowth of the Grace, "Lower Stone", Church, in Rowan County. 
We read: "When the congregation was organized by the Rev. George 
Boger, in 1806, it was in Montgomery Comity, but is now in Stanly 
County. It was a union church at its foundation. The Reformed 
members were a colony from the "Lower Stone" congregation. Among 
them were the Barnhardts, Mooses, Heglers, Seitzes. Their first house 
was a log building on a tract of land sold for this purpose by Chris- 
topher Lyerh . The Reformed congregation was few in niunber and 
weak in ^vealth in its early days. A new place of -worship had suc- 
ceeded the old log building. The Lutheran congregation had mo\ed 
elsewhere. The property is now entirely Reformed . . . Already in 
17! 5- 1750 all this region ^vas peo]:)le" by the flood of immigration from 
Pennsylvania, as was that on Dutch, Buffalo and Second Creek . . ."^ 

The statement that the Bethel congregation is "a colony from the 
'Lower Stone' congregation" has been accepted as fact through the 
years. Since the statement appears in the Colonial Records, no doubt 
it has been accepted as truth without question. But the facts indicate 
that the statement is incorrect. Here let us say, parenthetically, that if 
records had been a\ailable to others which are available to us now, 
they would have discovered and corrected the error at once. 

Elsewhere we give the names of those who were members of the 
original Dutch Buffalo Creek Church. A review of those names, along- 
side of the names of the members of Grace, "Lower Stone," will reveal 
that not one of the original members of Bethel Church, starting in 
1806 at its present location, not one came from the roll of the "Lower 
Stone" congregation. Their names do not appear in the records of that 
congregation. 



2. Historic Sketch of the Reformed Church in X. C. Welker, pages 216, 21" 

3. Colonial Records, Vol. VIII, page 745-1886, 'William L. Saunders. 

23 



Upon mailing a list of the names of members of the Dutch Buffalo 
Creek Church to the present pastor of Grace, "Lower Stone," Church, 
and also a list of the charter members of the Bethel German Reformed 
Church as listed in 1806, he writes back: "The names you have listed as 
charter members of Bethel are not any place that I have access to."^ 

But their names all appear on the role of the Dutch Buffalo Creek 
Church. Further, all of them owned land and lived in the Dutch 
Buffalo Creek area.^ And there it was that they had their church and 
school more than sixty years before they finally relocated where Bethel 
Church now stands. 

Quoting again, "In the old church record book, and in the old min- 
utes of the North Carolina Synod of the Lutheran Church, the con- 
gregation of St. John's is known as "Dutch Buffalo Creek Church," or 
"Meeting House," because its members were principally located along 
that stream of water and because their first place of worship and their 
first grave yard had its location near the same creek, three miles distant 
from its present situation. The first church edifice was, of course, ex- 
ceedingly plain— made of unhewn logs; and served the j^eople the 
double purpose of a schoolhouse and place of worship. Both the Ger- 
man Reformed and the Lutherans worshipped in the same building 
for a certain period of time, after which a more commodious building 
was erected for the united worship of the two denominations, about 
half a mile from the location of the present church edifice. This sec- 
ond building, in point of architecture was but little better than the 
former, except that it was somewhat larger, and fitted for the exclusive 
use of Divine worship. 

"About the year 1771, the members of the Lutheran Church, at the 
suggestion of Captain John Paul Barringer, separated themselves from 
their German Reformed brethren, and built their own church on the 
site of the upper portion of the old graveyard. "^ 

When St. John's Lutheran Church, Cabarrus Covmty, celebrated an 
anniversary in 1963, the pastor at that time, the Rev. C. Lee Shipton, 
prepared a history of the congregation. Since the St. John's Lutheran 
Church and Bethel German Reformed Church began as a union 
church with the name, the DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK CHURCH, 
and continued in that relationship until the separation was made in 
1771, the early history of St. John's is very similar to the history of 
Bethel Church, and his findings here have meaning for the German 
Reformed side, too. 

Dr. Bachman S. Brown, important member of the Committee on 
History of the North Carolina Synod of the Lutheran Church, writes 



4. Letter from Martin L. Parker, pastor, "Lower Stone" church, Nov. 14, 1972. 

5. Book of Deeds, Register and Recorder. Mecklenburg County. 

6. German Settlements and the Lutheran Church in the Carolinas, G. D. Bernheim, 
page 249. "Early History of St. John's Church, Cabarrus County, N. C. 

24 



that "Miihlenbiug airi\ed in Philadelphia Xo\-. 25, 1742. but there 
were three well-established churches before that time said to have some 
500 families each."" Thus the Lutherans had active and strong con- 
gregations in Pennsylvania even before Muhlenberg arrived to organize 
and unite them into a denominational fellowship or Synod. 

We have mentioned Rev. John Casper Stover, who travelled to 
North Carolina and in 1733 went to Virginia and finally stopped at 
the Hebron Lutheran Church— and his presence here indicates that 
there were at least some Lutherans in the area at that time, although 
they may have been very few.^ 

Arndt states in his "Journal" that when he and pastor Nussman 
arrived in North Carolina, the congregation on "Seeken" creek and 
the congregation on Dutch Buffalo Creek had been -without a pastor 
"more than a qtiarter of a century."^ Of coinse he means without 
a Lutheran pastor, as the Reformed pastors had been there during 
those early years of the congregation. Dr. Brown confirms the fact that 
the Reformed pastors were there from the beginning. 

The book, "Rowan," published in 1949, quotes from the "Carolina 
Watchman," (a Lutheran paper), of a Bible found that had the date 
of 1743 and given by a pastor preaching as he passed through North 
Carolina."!'^ 

Pastor Shipton writes, "It is my belief from all the research I have 
done that 1745 is certainly on the conservative side as the date for St. 
John's birthdate."!! 



7. A personal note of Dr. Brown on the original manuscript of this book. 

8. A History of the lAitheran Church in \'irginia and East Tennessee, page 36. 

9. Journal, or Diary, of Re\ . John Gottfried Arend, (Arndt), in the Archi\es at 
The Lutheran House, or North Carolina Synod Office, in Salisbury, N. C. 

10. A History, St. John's Lutheran Church, C. Lee Shipton. 

11. Ibid. 



THE CONSTITUTION OF ST. JOHN'S 
EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH SPEAKS OF 
THE DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK CHURCH AND OF 

THE GERMAN REFORMED CHURCH^ 

"From about 1743 German immigrants made their appearance in 
Piedmont, North Carolina, settling in the region now included in the 
counties of Forsyth, Guilford, Orange, Alamance, Davie, Davidson, 
Rowan, Stanly, Cabarrus, Gaston, Lincoln, Iredell and Stokes. The 
Lutherans came without ministers, but did not think it necessary to 



1. The First Constitution, St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church, Cabarrus County, 
Concord, N. C, in possession of the church. 

25 



wait for regular ministers in order to begin their cliurch work. On 
arrival, they set up their German services and duly elected elders and 
deacons conducted regular religious services. Under such an arrange- 
ment, St. John's, recorded in the old church record-book and in the 
earliest minutes of the North Carolina Synod as "Dutch Buffalo Creek 
Church", because its members were principally located along Buffalo 
Creek, is known to have been organized by 1745. Lutherans and 
German Reformeds worshipped together. Prior to 1773 the pastors 
were German Reformed. But the Lutherans desired a pastor of their 
own faith. They sought in vain to secure a pastor and teacher from 
Pennsylvania. Finally, in 1772, St. John's, Cabarrus, (then Mecklen- 
burg County), and Organ, (Zion) Church, Rowan County, sent Chris- 
topher Layrele of St. John's and Christopher Rintelman, of Organ, as 
commissioners to Europe to secure a pastor and teacher or pastors and 
teachers for the various Lutheran congregations then organized in 
North Carolina. They were sent to the Consistorial Council of Han- 
over, Germany, because North Carolina was under the jurisdiction of 
the King of England, who was at the same time elector of Hanover. 
They travelled at their own expense by way of Charleston, S. C, to 
London, where they received encouragement and a contribution from 
the Royal Court, and thence to Hanover. They returned in 1773 with 
the Reverend Adolph Nussman, as pastor, and Mr. John Gottfried 
Arend (Arndt), as school teacher. Thus the Rev. Nussman became the 
first pastor of these Lutherans, and the pioneer minister of the Lu- 
theran Church in the province of North Carolina. For more than a 
year pastor Nussman labored at Organ Church and in Salisbury. In 
1774 he became the pastor of St. John's and remained such until his 
death in 1794. 

"In 1775 Mr. Arend was ordained and became pastor at Organ 
Church. These two men faithfully served the Lutherans of the prov- 
ince as well as the two churches named until additional pastors arrived 
in 1787 and after. Their work was made more difficult almost from 
the beginning due to the Revolutionary War. 

"A short time before the close of the War this constitution was 
formulated and adopted for the government of St. John's congregation. 
Pastor Nussman compiled it in German from the "'Church Order of 
our Evangelical brethren in Smirna and that in use in England and 
Holland," making it suitable for local conditions. What place Smirna 
refers to I do not know. 

"This constitution, as will be noted was exceedingly strong in 
doctrine and discipline for pastor, teacher and people. It provided 
plans for securing future pastors and teachers for their support. Of 
particular interest is the manner in which it sought to provide for 
religious education and the responsibilities of the officers of the con- 
gregation in regard to these matters. The liturgy was adopted from 
the German Lutheran Court Chapel of St. James, London, and the 
Marburg hymn-book was introduced. The lengthy detail of the con- 

26 



stitution may not appeal to the churches of today, but it shows the 
serious effort put forth by Pastor Nussman and the people of St. John's 
church to provide the ministrations of the Church and religious edu- 
cation for all." 

"For the translation of this document I am indebted to the late 
Reverend Professor Voigt, D.D., L.L.D., of Columbia, S. C." 

John B. Moose 
Chicago Lutheran Seminary 
Maywood, 111. 

MEMBERS OF THE DUTCH BUFFALO 
CREEK CHURCH! 



REFORMED CHURCH: 

Earnhardt, Matthias (Also 

Lutheran) 
Barrier, John 
Dry (Dreu) 
Eudy 
Furr 

Hahn, Henry 
Harkey 
Hince 
Hurlocker 
Lefler 
Melcher 
Moose 
Penninger 
Plyler 
Saussman 
Sides 

Stikeleather 
Suther 
Suther (William) 



LU FHERAN CHURCH: 

Barnhardt (Reformed also) 

Barringer 

Beaver (Biber) 

Blackwelder 

Bushart 

Cline 

Cook 

Cress 

Fink 

House 

Karriker 

Limbach 

Lipe 

Ludwig 

Lyerly, Christopher (Reformed 

also) 
Lverlv. Zacharias (Reformed also) 
Misenheimer 
Myer (Meier) 
Plaster 
Propst 
Ridding 
Ridenhour 
Ritchie 
Shue (Shoe) 

1. From the first page of the first "Bear Creek" record book, in German. A copy of 
the translation is in the Archives of the Lutheran Church, in the North Carolina 
Synod office at Salisbury. 



27 



Sifford 
Springer 

Walker (Walcher) 
Webber (Webber) 

There are a total of 47 families in both groups, 19 German Reformed 
and 28 Lutheran. Some were members of both churches, and are 
counted in both groups. 

These families had their church and school near Mount Pleasant, 
above and east of the present Mount Pleasant High School, off the 
road leading to Watts Cross roads, until 1771, where a Monument now 
stands. At that time the Lutherans decided to build their own church, 
which they called St. John's, near where the present St. John's building 
is located— on the road from Mount Pleasant to Concord. Up until this 
time, as we have noted, the Lutherans had no preachers or teachers of 
their own faith, but were served by pastors and teachers of the Re- 
formed faith. Sixty families signed the petition asking the Governor 
to commission the two men to go to Germany in a search for pastors 
and teachers for them. 



THE DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK CHURCH 
NAME LINGERS 

After the Lutherans had built their own church, in 1771, they chose 
to call it St. John's Lutheran Church. But the old name, DUTCH 
BUFFALO CREEK CHURCH, was cherished by the members of both 
the Lutheran and the Reformed groups, and it continued to be used 
for years. 

As late as 1810, the name, "Buffalo Creek Chvuxh— St. John's," ap- 
pears in the record book of the North Carolina Synod of the Lutheran 
Church. 1 Thereafter, however, St. John's is used, and the original name 
discontinued. 

No doubt many, if not all of the German Reformed members went 
along with the relocation of the Lutheran part of the congregation, 
and were a part of the St. John's group for some years, retaining, 
however, their identification with the German Reformed Church. 
Later we will note that baptisms and attendance at services of Holy 
Communion were recorded for them at St. John's Church, indicating 
that they considered themselves members and were in attendance. 

However, it is also true that religious services were held in the area 
of the original Dutch Buffalo Creek Church, and/or near the present 
location of Bethel Church, for thirty years or more before Bethel 



1. Record Book of North Carolina Synod, 1810, page 37. 

28 



Church was located and the buikling erected in 1806. 2 Some of the 
German Reformed members, and some of the Lutherans who remained 
with them, apparent!) wanted to continue their worship according to 
their German Reformed tradition. Again we note that the ties which 
bound these folk to one another in their Christian fellowship were 
deep and strong, and apparently meant more to them than denomina- 
tional affiliation. The number of Lutherans who were a part of the 
Bethel German Reformed Church at their relocation in 1806 were of 
sufficient number to withdraw in 1872 and establish their own New 
Bethel Lutheran Church. ^ 

When these services ^vere being held in the homes, barns, under the 
trees, and in the area of the present location of Bethel German Re- 
formetl Church, frequent baptisms occmred at the homes of some of 
the members, a number being recorded as having been performed at 
the home oi a Caess family, and also Jacob Hagler.^ 

It is of particular interest to note, too, that, according to the early 
records of the St. John's congregation, money was transferred occa- 
sionally from the Buffalo Creek Church to the treasurer of St. John's 
Church, after St. John's had withdrawn from the Buffalo Creek Chinch 
and become a separate congregation. '^ 

One might conclude that some use was made of the building, and 
a rental fee was transferred to the St. John's treasurer. Possibly some 
members of the original Dutch Buffalo Creek Church, Reformed as 
well rs l^utheran, held occasional ser\ ices in the old building, and ])aid 
rent to St. John's for use of the property. 

But church records ^vere kept for all these people, Reformed as well 
as Luiheran, in the St. John's recoid book during the period from 1771 
to 1806. 

Nevertheless, some use was made of the old Dutch Buffalo Creek 
Church building during these years, as indicated by the money trans- 
ferred from the original congregation to the St. John's treasury. 



MONUMENT AT THE OLD CHURCH SITE 



"It is not definitely known when this church was first organized, but 
it is known to be one of the oldest Lutheran and Reformed chinches 
in North Carolina. The Congregation itself gives 1745 as the year of its 
on^anized betiinninti. 



2. Historic Sketch of the Reformed Church in \orth Carolina, ^Velker, page 216. A 
Story of Southern Synod. Evangelical and Reformed Church. Peeler, page 159. 

3. History of the Lutheran Chinch in North Carolina, Morgan, Bachman S. Brown, 
and Hall, 1803-1953, pages 257-258, "New Bethel, Stanly County." 

4. Cenealogical records in the files of Bernard W. Cruse. 

5. Original Iiistory of St. John's congregation, page 38, and other places. 

29 



When first organized this church owned its property jointly with a 
German Reformed Congregation. Judging from the writing of differ- 
ent historians, these two denominations were sufficiently numerous at 
that time to form a fairly large congregation. 

Their first place of worship was about two miles nortli of Mount 
Pleasant, not far from Buffalo Creek. Hence the organization was call- 
ed Dutch Buffalo Creek Church. The building was of unhewn pine 
logs, with no windows, floor or chimney. 

Large rocks at this old site indicate that there must have been a fire 
place and chimney. An old man wHlio lived near the monument said 
that as a boy he plowed up nails, handmade, near where the church 
stood. "1 

"On Thanksgiving Day, 1894, a stone monument was unveiled at 
that place to mark the original location of Dutch Buffalo Church. The 
stone was provided by friends of the different congregations who had 
made up the original Dutch Buffalo Church, to honor the dead as well 
as mark the location of the original church. Cemetery stones were 
much in evidence at that time. 

The Rev. J. Q. Wertz, who had just arrived as pastor at St. John's, 
and the Rev. G. H. Cox, D.D., pastor of Mt. Olive Church, conducted 
the services. They were assisted by Dr. B. S. Brown, Sr., pastor of Holy 
Trinity, and Rev. Paul Barringer, D.D., pastor of Bethel German Re- 
formed Church and St. James Church, Mount Pleasant, representing 
the German Reformed churches of the area."^ 

,"The Coldwater Lutheran Charge, composed of Coldwater Lutheran 
Church and New Gilead Reformed, had a building, pastor and pro- 
gram in 1766 which means that they broke away from the original 
Dutch Buffalo Creek Church to become established in the new location 
at least seven years before St. John's was established at their location 
in 1773. "3 

"The second church was located three miles west from the first place, 
on land now owned by Harry Cline, half a mile east of the present 
church. This building was also of logs, not much better than the first 
one. We have no record for the dates of this building. The old grave- 
yard marks the location, called "The Church Piece". In 1771 The 
Lutherans decided to build a church of their own. At this time the 
name was changed from Dutch Buffalo Creek Church to St. John's 
Lutheran Church."'* 



1. From personal files of Bernard W. Cruse, LL.D 

2. History of the Evangelical Lutheran Svnod and Ministerium of North Carolina- 
by G. D. Bernheim, D.D. and George H. Cox, D.D. 

3. New Gilead Church, A History of The German Reformed People On Cold- 
water-page 7, by Banks Shepherd. 

4. History of The Lutheran Church In North Carolina, p. 294-296, by Jacob L. 
Morgan, D.D., Bachman S. Brown, D.D. and John Hall, D.D. 

30 



r 



.3*.^ 



'S&iS^miZ 



V ■ -^4 





\\ '<x^v^\( 







Photos by David ^Veant & Frank K. Bostian 



The inscriptions on the monument are as follows: 
West side: This burying ground was donated by Edniond Foil, a 
member of the G. R. Church, to St. John's, Holy Trinity and Mt. Olive 
E. L. Churches and Bethel G. R. Church. 
South side: Erected Nov. 29, 1894 

East side: Sacred to those members of the Lutheran and German Re- 
formed Chinches who were binied here prior to 1750. 

Mr. Harry F. Cline, present owner of the land where the second 
chinch stood, as a small boy was present at the dedication of the 
Monument. 



COPY OF THE DEED^ 

THIS INDENTURE Made this the Eighth day of September, in the 
year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and eighty-eight, 
between Edminid Foil &: wife C^atharine, of the County of Cabarrus 
and State of North Carolina, of the first part, and R. W. Misenheimer 
for St. John's Ev. Luth. Church, H. W. Beaver for Mt. Olive Ev. Luth. 
Church, and H. T. J. Ludwig for Holy Trinity Ev. Luth. Church, of 
the County of Cabarrus and State of North Carolina on the second 
part. 

WITNESSETH; That the said parties of the first part, for and in 
consideration of the sum of One Dollars, to said parties of the first 
part in hand paid, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, have 
bargained, sold and conveyed, and by these presents do bargain, sell 
and convey unto the said parties of the second part, for the churches 
they represent, the following described real estate, situate, lying and 
being in the County of Cabarrus, and State of North Carolina: the 
same being known as the first grave yard in the bounds of the con- 
gregations of said churches, bounded as follows to wit: 

Beginning at a Stone in C>harles Ludwig's line, Thence with said 
line N 71° W 2 poles & 8 links to a Stone, Thence N 19° E 3 poles to 
a Stone, Thence S 71° E 2 poles & 8 links to a Stone, Thence South 
19° W 3 poles to the beginning, containing 6 and 96/100 scj. poles. 

TO HAVE AND TO HOLD all and singular the above granted 
premises, with the appurtenances, unto the said parties of the second 
part, for the churches they represent forever. And the said Edmund 
Foil and wife Catherine of the first part, for themselves, their heirs, 
executors and administrators, do hereby covenant with the said parties 
of the second part, and the churches they represent, that they are 
seized of the premises in fee simple; that the said premises are free 
from all encumbrances; that they have good right and lawful authority 
to sell the same; and that they will warrant and defend the said prem- 
ises unto the said parties of the second part, and the churches they 
represent, against the lawful claims of all persons whatsoever. 

5. Office of Register of Deeds, Cabarrus County. 

31 



IN TESTIMONY ^VHEREOF, The said parties of the first part 
have here set their hands and seals, the day and year first above written. 
Signed, sealed and delivered in the presence of 

E. Foil 

C. L. Foil Seal 

(One wonders why the German Reformed Church was not included 
among the churches taking the deed to this property, since the German 
Reformed Church was a part of the original Dutch Buffalo Creek 
Church, and since the land in the first place was donated by Edmond 
Foil, of the German Reformed Church, as a burving ground. Perhaps 
we of the German Reformed Church have not been as interested in 
preser\ ing a record of our history as we ought to be, and Mr. Foil con- 
sidered it unimportant. At any rate, we are indebted to the members of 
the Lutheran congregations for marking the spot where the tirst imion 
Reformed and Lutheran Church was located in the Piedmont area of 
North Carolina.) 



SOME FAMILIES ^VHO WERE MEMBERS OF 
DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK CHURCH^ 

Here are listed the names of some of the families who were members 
of this early church. The record of baptisms, attendance at services of 
Holy Commimion, etc., were recorded in the St. John's Church record 
book for those who considered themselves to be members of the original 
Dutch Buffalo Creek Church, after St. John's became the Lutheran 
congregation in 1771. You will recall that the old name, Dutch Buffalo 
Creek Church, continued to be used of the St. John's group for ap- 
proximately forty years. 

1. Henry Sides, son of Henry Sides, came to Philadelphia on the ship, 
"Lydia," Dec. II, 1739. His name is listed in the census of 1790. Henry 

was born in 1774, and died in 1830. He married Amelia . 

His sons were: Henry, Jr., Moses, Levi, Steven, ^Villiam, Joseph, Ben- 
jamin, Charlie and John. All ^vere baptized at the Dutch Buffalo 
Creek Church. 

2. Zacharias Lyerly, son of Christopher Lyerly (Layerly), who went to 
Germany in 1771 in search of a minister and teacher for their church. 
He is listed in his father's will, and is in the census of 1790. He was 
married to Catherine Van Poole. His son, John, born Oct. 9, 1797, was 
baptized April 8, 1798. Sponsors at the baptism were Henrv Smith and 
his wife, Christine. There were other children in this family. 

3. John Ban-ier, born Oct. 23, 1770, and died Dec. 9, 1840. He married 
Barbara Peck, daughter of Frederick and Elizabeth Peck. Barbara was 



1. Names taken from first page of the original Bethel Record book, the translation 
by Dr. Bernheim. 

32 



born Nov. 4, 1771, and died Nov. 17, 1843. Their child was: Andrew, 
born Nov. 30, 1797, baptized Dec. 10, 1797. 

4. Frederick Peck, born Feb. 15, 1734, and died Sept. 17, 1830. He 
married Elizabeth Bushardt in 1769 or 1770. She was born Nov. 28, 
1748, and died March 19, 1823. 

5. William Heynseman, married Mary Ann Blackwelder. This one 
child, Christine, was born Oct. 3, 1798, and was baptized Jan. 13, 1799. 
Sponsors were Henry Hahn and wife, Christine. 

6. Matthias Earnhardt was born Apr. 6, 1752, on Buffalo Creek. He 
died June 6, 1818. His wife was Anna Margaret Bushardt. 

7. Henry Hahn and wife, Christine. Their son, Henry, was born Jan. 

17, 1798. He was baptized April 8, 1798. Sponsors were William 
Heynesman and Mary Ann Blackwelder. The records indicate that 
they took the Holy Communion in the Buffalo Creek Church May 
28, 1798. 

8. Henry Smith and wife, Christine. Their son, Henry, was born April 

18, 1779. Zacharias Lyerly and wife were sponsors for the baptism. 
(Uncertain if date given is for birth or baptism.) 

9. Christopher Gregory and wife, Christina. Their child, Christina, 
born July 20, 1785, and died Nov. 9, 1871. They went to Illinois, and 
were members of Bost Hill Lutheran C>hurch, near Hillsboro, Mont- 
gomery County, 111. 

10. Jacob Hegler (Hagler), is listed in the 1790 census of Mecklenburg 
County. The neighbors were, according to the census report— as they 
listed names of families as they came to them, and not alphabetically: 
House, Hurlocker, Hartsell, Jarrett, Honeycutt, Cress, Litaker, Linker, 
Lipe, Lyerly, Melchoir, Misenheimer. All are from the Buffalo Creek 
area. 

11. John Ridenhour and wife, Elizabeth. Child, Moses, born Mar. 28, 
1799, and baptized Apr. 21, 1799; Nicholas Ridenhour, and wife, Cath- 
erine, sponsors. John and Elizabeth took communion Sept. 23, 1798. 

12. William Lowder and wife, Elizabeth, had one child, Elizabeth. She 
was born June 8, 1798, and baptized Mar. 24, 1799. Frederick Peck and 
wife, Elizabeth, sponsors. 

13. Andrew Smith, and wife, Catherine. 1799 diary says services were 
held in homes, barns, among trees, wherever they could gather. "Serv- 
ices held today at Jacob Hagler's house. Mar. 3, 1799. Four children 
were baptized. (George Boger's first wife was Elizabeth Hagler, to 
whom no children were born.) Their son, Andrew Smith, was among 
the four. Christopher and Ann Schmidt, sponsors. Rev. Nicholas 
Marcard, pastor of St. John's, preached. 

14. Mrs. Barbara Moose, widow of Jacob Moose. (Mrs. Rebecca Moose 
is listed sometimes.) 

33 



15. Jacob Barrier, and wife, Katherine. He was born Sept. 13, 1774, 

and died Mar. 1 1 (Stone broken, and year unknown.) Katherine 

born Nov. 1, 1782; and died April 5, 1846. Graves are at St. John's 
Lutheran Ghmch. He is listed as one of the organizers of the Bear 
Creek German Reformed Church. Records of St. John's Lutheran 
Church show that they were members there. They really held mem- 
bership in both congregations. 

16. Christopher Lyerly, and wife, Elizabeth. He was born in 1762, on 
Buffalo Creek. He is listed in his father's will, and in the census of 
Mecklenburg County in 1790. He is listed on the rolls of both churches, 
St. John's, and Bethel, "Bear Creek." He sold 112 acres of land to 
Bethel Church for their building and cemetery. He is buried at St. 
John's, Mill Cheek, Township, Union Countv, Illinois. (Died while on 
a visit there.) 

Under number 13, Andrew Smith, at the services held at Jacob 
Hagler's house, where four children were baptized, the Rev. Nicholas 
Marcard, pastor of St. John's Church, was the preacher. And this was 
one of the services which, for more than thirty years, was held in the 
area, and not in a church building. The pastor of St. John's Lutheran 
Church was preaching that day. During the years, these two congrega- 
tions—beginning as a union Church in the Dutch Buffalo Creek 
Church— enjoyed a most wholesome and commendable relationship. 
During the first approximately thirty years, the Reformed ministers 
attended to the needs of both groups, and later, often the Lutheran 
pastor did likewise. These good folk of Dutch Buffalo Creek Church 
were attached to each other, and to their ministers, and found joy and 
blessing in their fellowship. 

GEORGE ROGER ATTENDS THE DUTCH 
BUFFALO CREEK CHURCH SCHOOL. 

The name. Rev. George Boger, is well known to all who are ac- 
quainted with the early history of the German Reformed Church in 
North Carolina. He was one of our prominent ministers, and did a 
monumental work as pastor of some of our larger congregations in the 
early settlements of German Reformed People in this state. 

In his diar)' he names the school on Buffalo Creek, an important 
part of the Dutch Buffalo Creek Church, which he attended. He gives 
other important data of interest to historians and genealogists, and we 
are glad to make his diary a part of this historical story. 

The curriculum in that day included the traditional "Three R's"— 
reading, writing and arithmetic, plus Bible, Latin, Greek and history. 
When one mastered these subjects, he was considered educated. 

Information about his education, and about his life, appear in his 

34 



diary, and we will not repeat that here. But we do want to list the 
churches which he served:^ 

Bethany, Davidson County, 1803-1812 

Bethel, Stanly County, 1806-1830 

Beulah, Davidson County, 1812-1827 

Emmanuel, Davidson County, 1812-1827 

Grace, "Lower Stone", 1803-1830 

New Gilead, Cabarrus County, 1803-1830. 

The fact that he served several widely separated congregations at 
the same time indicates that Boger must have been a man of unusual 
strength and ability. 

His name is honored particularly in having one congregation named 
after him. "Boger Reformed (Chinch, " in the East Rowan Charge. We 
read, "The land on which the church stands was once owned by Rev. 
George Boger, who was ordained to the Christian ministry March 6, 
1803, at Mt. Zion (Savitz) Church, Rowan County. Mr. Boger served 
his entire ministry of forty-four years within the bounds of the Classis 
of North Carolina. The site was donated for the purpose by Mrs. 
Caroline Boger: thus the church gets its name, "Boger Reformed 
Church," honoring this devoted minister of the Gospel. "^ 

Preceding his diary and other historical data related to George 
Boger and his family, we print a letter from one of his relatives. 

Lebanon, Pa. 
Aug. 23, 1894 

From: Cyrus Boger, A.M. 
City Superintendent of Schools 
1212 Lehman St. 

To: Mr. James C. Fink 
Concord, N. C. 

Dear Sir: 

In answer to your letter of inquiry relative to the Boger family, I have 
the following information: According to the Colonial Records of Pa., 
the Ship, "Samuel," brought to Philadelphia, on Aug. 11, 1732, from 
Rotterdam, 217 Palatines. Among the names on the ship's passenger 
list are found the names of Hans Paulus Boger, Michael Boger, and 
Matthias Boger. These three men were evidently brothers of whom the 
' youngest Matthias was under sixteen years of age and the only one of 
whom as yet I have been able to get definite knowledge. As early as 



1. A Story of Southern Synod of the Evangelical and Reformed Church, Banks J. 
Peeler, name of George Boger and churches and dated he served are given with 
the story of each of the churches. 

2. A Story of the Southern Synod, Evangelical and Reformed Church, Banks J. 
Peeler, pages 173, 174. 

35 



1755 his name occurs as one of the taxables of Lebanon Township, 
Lancaster County. His sons were Jacob, Valentine, Matthew and 
Christian. The first, or oldest, Jacob, of whom is said to have migrated 
to South Carolina and there raised a family of 12 children. Some of his 
sons are said to have died as soldiers of the Revolution. This seems to 
agree with your letter for you mention Jacob as your great grandfather. 
The second son, Valentine, was my grandfather: He succeeded to his 
father's property, and at his death, my father, (Joseph) became heir to 
the original propertv; and at mv father's passing I still hold the greater 
part of the original 200 acres. The youngest of Matthew's sons. Chris- 
tian, moved to Berlin, Somerset Co., this state. There he had three 
sons. Chrisnan, Martin and Tobn. The oldest. Christian, Tvas raised by 
my grandfather; but on maturitv returned to Somerset Co., this state, 
and became the father of seven children, two sons and five daughters. 
In 1857 I spent a few weeks, verv pleasantly, among these relatives. 
On several occasions they visited us. Latelv all communications be- 
tween us has been neglected. My father had onlv one brother and one 
sister. The sister died young, but uncle John raised a family of three 
sons and three daughters. Our immediate familv was comoosed of one 
son, mvself, and two daughters, the oldest of whom is dead and the 
next lives in Baxter Springs, Kansas. I have four sons and one dauo-h- 
ter. Mv oldest son, Cvrus, is a phvsician in Parkersburg;. TV. Va. The 
second, Charles, is a drueeist in Lebanon. Pa., the third, 'W^illiam, is a 
Mechanical Engineer, and the fourth, Henrv, is a machinist. My 
daughter. Alice, and Henrv, still live at home with the parents. The 
rest are all married and have children. 

Your ereat-grreat uncles, other sons. Martin and John moved, the first 
to Ohio, and the other to Virsfinia. A fe^v vears ago, when mv son 
William was stationed at Basic Citv. Va., erecting^ some car works, he 
found there a certain Dr. Fox, who claimed that his mother Avas a 
Boeer. She mav be a descendant of this John. So vou see the Boo;er 
familv is larg-e. Now be kind enou2;h to give me in return as full an 
account as possible of Jacob's descendants. You say that your great 
grandfather was born in 1745, this as-rees with mv statement that he 
was one of Matthew's sons for I find that mv own o-randfather, Valen- 
tine, was born Oct. 17, 1858. From this time of Matthew's arrival in 
1732 to 1745 was long enough to find himself a wife, locate his land 
by warrant, and start raising a family. 

You say your great grandfather's brothers Avere Peter and Daniel. If 
this is correct, he cannot have been Matthew's son, because his sons 
were as stated above. 

As to Macedonia Township, I must sav that I kno^v of no such township 
in our state. Ovu' neighboring toTvnship, Berks, has a to^vnship called 
Maxata^vny. The pronunciation of this could have been corrupted into 
Macedonia. It is just possible that Hans Paulus or Michael settled 
there. In the townships of Berks, viz. Long Swamp and Lochland, both 
adjoining Maxatawny, I find the name of Boger among the taxables 

36 



in Long Swamp as early as 1756, and in Lockland as early as 1757. 
Both these townships were settled by Germans. In Long Swamp town- 
ship, Martin Boger's name is found, and in Lockland, Jacob Boger. 
These facts I ascertained just now from an old history in my possession 
and since I received your letter. It has put me on a new track, and I 
mean to look further into it. Now be kind to give me a little more 
information on the Bogers in N. C. What is the extent of the family, 
the religion, the language, all of which will be gratefully received and 
reciprocated. 

Truly yours, 
CYRUS BOGER 



DIARY OF GEORGE BOGER AND 
GENEALOGICAL FACTS OF HIS FAMILY 

He writes: "My father, Jacob Boger who was born in Macedonia 
Township, Penn., and married Miss Loefferin, who was raised in the 
same county and state. Shortly after their marriage they migrated to 
North Carolina and settled in Cabarrus County on the (so called) 
Buffalo Creek." 

The name of George Boger is well known and highlv respected 
among those who are acquainted with the early history of the German 
Reformed Church in North Carolinn. In his diary he specifically 
names the settlement of German families on Buffalo Creek, and the 
school which he attended there. His testimony is another confirmation 
of the fact that the Dutch Buffalo Creek Church, or Meeting House, 
and school, from which the Bethel German Reformed Church and the 
St. John's Lutheran Church came, plaved an important part in both 
the religious and the educational development of this community. 

Parenthetically, we include here some genealogical facts about the 
Boger family, as a way of preserving it for posterity as well as making 
it available to those who are interested in it.^ 

Here we present a sketch of the following members of the Boger 
family: 

Boger, Hans Paulus 
Boger, Michael 
Boger, Mathias 
Boger, Jacob 
Boger, Matthew 
Boger, Christian 

About the beginning of the Seventeenth Century, the Protestants of 
the Palatinate, on the Rhine, (now known as Bavaria), Germany, were 



1. From records and documents as recorded by James C. Fink, Concord, N. C. 

37 



forced to flee from their homes and also their home lands. They could 
no longer endure the persecutions which the Roman Catholics in- 
flicted upon them. They had seen their fences torn down, their crops 
destroyed, and the heartless burning of their buildings— homes and 
farms as well as churches. The only hope for them was escape to some 
other country. 

On August 11, 1731, the good ship, "Samuel," commanded by Hugh 
Piercy, of London, sailed from Rotterdam, and landed at Philadelphia 
with 217 from the Palatinate. Among the passengers were the following 
names: 

Hans Paulus Boger 

Michael Boger 

Mathias Boger (16 years old). 

They were brothers. 

This Mathias Boger settled in Lancaster County, Lebanon Town- 
ship, Pennsylvania. His sons were: 

Jacob Boger b. Oct. 12, 1745-d. Dec. 25, 1831 
Valentine Boger b. Oct. 17, 1758 
Mathew Boger 
Christian Boger 

This Jacob Boger was born Oct. 17, 1745, and died Dec. 25, 1831. He 
married Barbara Laffer (Lefler), Sept. 20, 1772. She was born Decem- 
ber, 1750, and died April 15, 1819. She was a sister of Theophilus 
Laffer, Loeffler, Lotter, Lefler (various spellings of the same name), 
who was a prominent school teacher in this area during this period. 

Jacob and Barbara Lefler Boger had the following children: 

Daniel Boger b. Oct. 9, 1773; d. May 19, 1826 

Elizabeth Boger b. Nov. 10, 1775 

Jacob Boger b. May 19, 1777 

Catherine Boger b. July 10, 1780 (Married Jacob File, Uncle of Con- 
nie File). 

George Boger b. Dec. 15, 1782; d. June 19, 1865. 

The following is a sketch of George Boger's life, written with his 
own hand, and in German.^ 

"In the name of God. Amen. Give Him the glory. 

"I, George Boger, was born Dec. 15, 1782, in Cabarrus County, N. C, 
and was baptized by Rev. Suther. My God-parents being George Good- 
man and Rosina Foil, the latter unmarried. I was raised and educated 
within the confines of North Carolina. 

"My father, Jacob Boger, was born in Macedonia Township (Maxa- 
tawny), Penn., and married Miss Loefferin, who was raised in the same 

2. Colonial Records of North Carolina, \'ol. VIII, and Hist( ric Sketch of the Re- 
formed Church in North Carolina, by George W. Welker, D.D. 

38 



state and county. Shortly after their marriage, they migrated to North 
Carolina, and settled in Cabarrus County, on the (so called) Buffalo 
Creek. 

"Here I attended my first school (German) being at that time seven 
or eight years old, this school was under the management of Mr. Joseph 
Hentzly. When I was nine years old, I attended Mr. Martin Schlump's 
school one month. At the age of eleven, I attended Mr. Joseph Hentzly's 
school (German) six months. At fourteen or fifteen, I attended another 
school, but at this time it was in English, taught by Mr. John Yeoman, 
and now at the age of 16 years, 4 months and 15 days, I was sent by my 
father to a class of Catechumens under Rev. Samuel Wineburg 
(Weyberg). After attending these instructions six months I was con- 
firmed in the faith of the Evangelical Reformed Church, at the Com- 
munion service of Whit Sunday, May 12, 1799. I now had the desire to 
study Divinity, feeling compelled to preach, and believing that I was 
personally called to the Holy Order. 

"I mentioned this to Rev. Wineberg, my pastor, who offered me all 
of the assistance he could in my studies. After attending seven months 
under him, I endeavored to preach my first sermon, being now 17 
years and 4 months old. 

"The Lord blessed my efforts during my labors for Rev. Wineburg, 
and was engaged with him until the year 1800, preaching occasionally 
at three or four churches, and during this time lived with my parents. 

"I now went under the care of Rev. Storch for several months. In 
April, 1802, I went to Rev. Andrew Loretz, in Lincoln County, N. C. 
After being under his instruction for ten months, I was ordained by 
him March 6, 1803, in the so-called Savitz Church, in Rowan County, 
ten miles from Salisbury, (now known as Mount Zion Church.) 

"I was ordained in the name of the Holy Trinity, as minister in the 
Reformed Church, and received the permission to administer the Sac- 
raments, to which I asked the help and blessing of the Holy Trinity 
in all my labors and undertakings. 

"The persons who asked Rev. Loretz to ordain me as their minister 
were: William Schmetter, Henry Barringer, John Shuman, Adam Cor- 
rell, Michael Peeler, Christian Schumann, Jacob Correll, Nicholas 
Shuping, Christopher Lindler (Leefler), Ludwig Bieber, Jacob Misen- 
heimer, Christopher Lyerly, Henry Casper, Jacob Lindler and Fred- 
erick Seibert. (Another list names a Joseph Correll, not Jacob, and 
Jacob Reider instead of Lindler.). I was now 20 years, 2 months, 2 
wks. and 4 days old. 'Just in the prime of life.' 

"Oh, Almighty God, bless and protect me, give me a full measure of 
the Holy Spirit, so that I may be able to prosecute the duties of my 
high calling, as Thou desirest me to do. O, Lord Jesus, Let Thy Light 
shine upon me, and give me strength that I may preach Thy word with 
understanding, power and boldness. Oh Holy iSpirit, lead me, give me 

39 



strength in my weakness, and bestow Thy blessings upon my labors, 
and Thy name shall receive the praise in a world without end. Amen. 

After he was unable to preach on account of age and weakness, he 
wrote the following note: 

"I, George Boger, was born on the 15th day of December, in the 
year of our Lord Jesus Christ, 1782. 

I was ordained to the holy ministry the 6th. day of March, 1803, I 
have had charge of some congregations for upwards to 30 years. I have 
preached in my time 1,663 sermons, 301 funeral services, baptized 1919 
children, confirmed 627 persons, and married 201 pairs." 

He died on Monday, the 19th. of June, 1865, aged 82 years, 6 months 
and 4 days. His funeral was preached on the 20th. day of June by Rev. 
J. B. Anthony. Text: Gen. 15:15; also, 25:8. His remains are buried at 
the "Lower Stone" Church, where he was pastor for many years. His 
second wife, Elizabeth, and his son James William Boger, are buried 
at his side. 

Rev. George Boger was married three times: 

L To Elizabeth Hagler, on Nov. 16, 1806. She was bom Feb. 28, 
1785, and died May 29, 1809. There were no children. 

2. To Elizabeth Barnhardt, on Nov. 1, 1810. She was born Dec. 3, 
1783, and died Apr. 28, 1836. There were ten children, listed 
below. 1 

3. To Elizabeth File, on July 4, 1837. She was born Jan. 17, 1806, 
and died . There were two children, listed below. 

Children of George and Elizabeth Barnhardt Boger: 

Mathias born 7 24 1811 Died 11 8 1866 

John George born 1 8 1813 

Eva Eliz born 12 18 1814 Died 12 25 1814 

Leah born 2 9 1816 Died 1896 

Anna born 4 22 1818 Died 8 5 1900 

John E. born 8 28 1820 Died 4 12 1895 

Eliz (Betsy) born 11 4 1823 Died 7 14 1904 

Daniel Monroe born 2 17 1827 Died 10 13 1843 

John William born 4 15 1831 Died 1 7 1835 

Margaret born 8 23 1834 Died 11 8 1898 

Children of George and Elizabeth File Boger: 

Jacob born 5 16 1838 Died 11 4 1862 

(A prisoner of war at Frederick City, Md. Aged 24 years, 
5 months, 10 days.) 



From "Carolina Watchman," May 7, 1836: "Died in Cabarrus County, 28 April, 
Mrs. Elizabeth Boger, wife of the Re\'. George Boger. Age 42 years and 5 months." 
Courtesy of Mr. J. K. Rouse, Kannapolis, N. C, Friday, April 26, 1974. (Date of 
death is identical, but a difference of more than ten years in her age, according 
to birth date given in the genealogical record of George Boger.) 

4a 



Sallie (Not written) 

(Salome) born 11 11 1844 Died 12 28 1873 

Children of Mathias Boger: 

Peter born 11 18 1742 Died 11 11 1823 

Jacob born 10 12 1745 Died 12 25 1831 

Daniel born 2 18 1748 Died 

Elizabeth born 6 2 1740 Died 

Margaretta born 5 21 1750 Died 

Children of Jacob Boger: 

Daniel born 10 9 1773 Died 5 19 1826 

Eliz born 11 10 1775 Died 

Jacob born 5 29 1777 Died 

Catherine born 7 10 1780 Died 

George born 12 15 1782 Died 6 19 1865 

SOME MINISTERS WHO SERVED THE 
DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK CHURCH 

From early records, we know some of the ministers who served the 
DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK CHURCH: Rev. Christian Theus, Rev. 
John Christian Seyfert, Rev. James Martin, Rev. Samuel Weyburg 
(Wayberg, Wineberg). Rev. Webber, Werber, and Rev. Samuel Suther, 
among others about whom less is known at present. 

In speaking of Grace Church, "Lower Stone," we read, "It is difficult 
to determine who, among the Reformed ministers of that era served 
this congregation prior to 1768. Those were days when a few dedicated 
souls did yeoman's service in looking after the spiritual needs of 
German settlements in North and South Carolina. Rev. Christian 
Theus, who resided just over the line in South Carolina, was serving 
in this manner in 1755, and made "occasional visits to the German 
settlements in North Carolina. "i 

"The Rev. Christian Theus thus made occasional visits from South 
Carolina to German settlements in North Carolina beginning in 
1739."2 

"Theus, Christian, visited and preached at German settlements in 
North Carolina from time to time between 1740-1780. "3 

Since DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK COMMUNITY was well known 
in that day, and since there are references to his ministrations in 



1. A Story of Southern Synod, Banks J. Peeler, page 274. 

2. Ibid., page 403. 

3. Ibid., page 492. 

41 



genealogical records, we know that he visited and preached here on 
different occasions. 

John Christian Seyfert was an "indepndent Reformed minister of 
whom but iew traces have been found. Christian Seyfert subscribed to 
the oath of allegiance at Philadelphia August 27, 1739, having arrived 
on the ship, "Samuel," Hugh Percy, Captain. In the Captain's list his 
age is given as 42 years; hence he was born in 1697. . . . Seyfert owned 
a sermon book by Conrad Mel, now preserved in the library of the 
Schwenkfelder Historical Society at Perkiomen Seminary, Pennsburg, 
Pennsylvania. In it is the following inscription, which translated into 
English reads: 

"This book belongs to me, J. Ch. Seyfert, Reformed Schoolmaster 
and Minister of the Word of God at Great S^vamp. On St. Michael's 
Day, (September 29th.) 1739, according to the new calendar, I arrived 
at Great Swamp in the Reformed congregation. May the gi-eat God 
grant me power, wisdom and strength to teach the word of God in its 
purity, as a comfort to poor souls and as a means for the extension of 
the Kingdom of Jesus Christ. Amen. 

"Seyfert preached at Great S^vamp, apparently from 1739 until the 
arrival of George Michael Wiess, in 1746. What became of him after- 
wards we do not know."^ 

But our local records indicate that he served at DUTCH BUFFALO 
CREEK CHURCH, as schoolmaster, pastor and preacher. 

"Mr. Andrew Loretz, Sr., was commissioned by the deputies of the 
Holland Synod as a missionary to Pennsylvania on November 18, 1784, 
together with another Swiss minister, the Rev. Barnard W'illy. . . . 
Young Loretz had accompanied his father. This is certain from the 
fact that he acted as sponsor at the first baptism entered by his father 
in the Trinity Tulpehocken record. The sponsor is given as Andrew 
Loretz, Jr., born at Chur.''^ 

The father returned to Switzerland, but the son, Andrew, Jr., re- 
mained in America, and turned his face to the south, coming to North 
Carolina. In the year 1786 he married a Baltimore ^vido^v, named 
Schaefer, maiden name Elizabeth Lehman. He received a call about 
this time from some Reformed congregation in North Carolina. This 
implies that he must have been ordained for the ministry, but when, 
where, and by whom this ordination is not known. It is barely possible 
that the Coetus of Pennsylvania ordained him privately, -tvithout a 
public record of it, as they ordained Samuel 'Weyberg in 1793. 

Loretz located in Lincoln County, North Carolina . . . He also made 
numerous missionary tours to Rowan and Guilford Counties, and even 



4. MINISTERS OF THE GERMAN REFORMED CONGREGATIONS, Hinke, 
pages 331, 332. 

5. Ibid., pages 210, 211. 

42 



to the Lexington district of South Carolina. "^ 

He must have visited the Dutch Buffalo Creek Church, and become 
an acquaintance of George Boger, for Boger says that he became his 
student when preparing for the ministry. And Pastor Loretz ordained 
Boger at services in the Savitz (Mount Zion) congregation. '^ He did lots 
of travelling to all the German settlements of both North and South 
Carolina, and that included the DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK 
CHURCH area, too. 

Rev. Samuel Suther lived in the area, and taught school and 
preached at Dutch Buffalo Creek Church, too. Before coming to North 
Carolina, we read, "On October 26, 1749, the following advertisement 
appeared in the Pennsylvania Gazette: "Samuel Suther, schoolmaster in 
Cherry Street, hereby gives notice that he teaches in the High German 
language, and those who have aimed to learn the same may be in- 
formed of him by Michael Slater, High German Minister.' "^ 

History books contain no record of Suther after this time until June, 
1768, when he began preaching in Mecklenburg County, North Caro- 
lina, as pastor of the Coldwater charge— union Reformed and Lutheran 
congregation. 

"Coldwater was at one time the oldest German religious organiza- 
tion in Western North Carolina; it had a pastor even before the Rev. 
A. Nussman came to America in 1773; this pastor was the Rev. Mr. 
Suther, a German Reformed minister, some of whose descendants are 
still living in Concord, N. C, and are worthy members of the Lutheran 
Church there. "^ 

The authors would add that many of his descendants are also active 
and reliable members of many of the Reformed churches in the area, 
now of the United Church of Christ, as well as in some other denomi- 
nations. Carrying on the tradition of their ancestor, Samuel Suther, 
they are good churchmen and church women. In fact, Nola Janice 
Engle, of California, who spends the summers with her grandparents, 
O. Rush and Viola Suther, was confirmed as a member of the New 
Gilead Reformed United Church of Christ, Old Salisbury Road, Con- 
cord, N. C, on Sunday, August 18, 1974. She had the great desire to 
join the church where her mother and grandfather, and ancestors for 
seven generations, have belonged. New Gilead became the Reformed 
part of the original Coldwater Church, of which Samuel Suther was 
pastor, when the congregation divided and became separate units. 

Also, in the class of ten confirmed on April 7, 1974, three represented 
the seventh generation coming from the DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK 

6. Ibid., page 408-411. 

7. Op. Cit., Historic Sketch of the Reformed Church in North Carolina, Welker, 
pp. 39-40. 

8. Op. Cit., Ministers of the German Reformed Church, Hinke, page 389. 

9. COLONIAL RECORDS, Sanders, Vol. VIII, page 780. 

43 



MEETING HOUSE. In the Hurlocker, Barrier and Moose family, Jill, 
daughter of Robert T. and Geraldine Barrier Hurlocker; in the Dry 
(Dreu), Suther and Misenheimer famih, Susan Misenheimer, daughter 
of Hal and Judy Misenheimer; and representing the Barrier and Pen- 
ninger family, Brandon, son of Frank C. and Penny Barrier. 

A review of the names on the first membership roll -"^f the DUTCH 
BUFFALO MEETING HOUSE will display that most of those family 
names continue on our roll today, August, 1974. (See Chapter VII). 

The influence of Suther and other ministers of the Dutch Buffalo 
Creek Church reached far beyond the area of Mecklenburg and Ca- 
barrus counties. Many of the Reformed and Lutheran groups migrated 
to Illinois, Union County, in the early 1800's. By 1820, the U. S. Census 
report carried the names of 83 families from Rowan and Cabarrus 
Counties who had settled there. They established the oldest Lutheran 
Church in Illinois, and called it St. John's, after their beloved St. John's 
here, which had come originally from the Dutch Buffalo Creek Meet- 
ing House, or Church. 

Three men who went to Illinois, Peter Misenheimer, Lutheran, 
Christopher Lyerlv, Reformed, and Adam Clapp, from Ro'^van County 
and his church affiliation not known, were memorialized Sunda^', Aug. 
11, 1974, when the St. John's congregation rededicated the grave sites 
where their bodies were laid at rest when they entered the Church 
Triumphant. 

We are glad to see that the influence of the Dutch Buffalo Meeting 
House, or Church, continues into the third century, and it will con- 
tinue, for "Crowns and thrones may perish, Kingdoms rise and ■wane. 
But the Church of Jesus Constant Tvill remain . . ." 

Records indicate that Samuel Suther, and his wife, Elizabeth, were 
living in Orangeburg Cotmty, S. C, from 1751 to 1760. Samuel Suther 
is listed as a Avitness at four ^veddings performed bv and in the personal 
records of John Ulrich Giessendanner, Minister. Also, -^vithin the vears 
given, he was a Avitness at eight baptisms, and his ■wife, Elizabeth, is 
listed as being a witness at seven baptisms. One would assume that he 
was away, either preaching or teaching school, ■^vhen his "^vife ■^vas a 
witness ■^vithout him. Also, three children of theirs, ^vere born and 
baptized, which names, dates and facts are contained in this record. ^o 
The children were Johann Henry, Jacob and Elizabeth. 

"In the year 1768 Suther was preaching in Mecklenburg Countv, 
(now Cabarrus), in what was then Coldwater Church. Governor Tryon 
refers to him in his diarv under date Au2;ust 21, 1768: 

"Heard Mr. Suther, a Dutch minister, preach, who recommended 
with warmth a due obedience to the Laws of the countrv and a union 



10. Salley, A. S., Jr., THE HISTORY OF ORANGEBURG COUNTY, (S. C), Re- 
gional Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1969, pages 112-191. 

44 



of heart to support the Peace and Tranquility of the Province.' The 
governor ordered Suther to accompany the Rowan and Mecklenburg 
battalions as chaplain, which he did. While they were encamped at 
Hillsboro, Suther preached to the troops, as shown in the following 
order of the governor: 'It is ordered that Mr. Suther preach tomorrow 
(September 25, 1768) to the Rowan and Mecklenburg battalions.' "ii 

While Suther was the established pastor of Coldwater Church in 
1768, he must have been in the area several years prior to that. It is the 
consensus of those who have studied the period that, as he came south 
through the German settlements in Orange County, North Carolina, 
and then the Dutch Buffalo Creek area, and finally in Orangeburg 
County, S. C, he saw opportunity for serving in those communities as 
a preacher and teacher, and that he travelled back and forth through 
the years serving in that way. The records reveal that he owned land in 
several places, at different and sometimes at the same time; and these 
places must have been home where his family stayed as he was away 
following his profession. 

As evidence that Samuel Suther owned land and lived on Dutch 
Buffalo Creek, we are showing a survey of a tract of land containing 
125 acres, made for one Michael Christman, dated 7 August, 1767.^^ 
This land was leased, then sold to Suther within two years. It was on 
the North Branch of Dutch Buffalo Creek, sometimes called Black 
Creek or Saw Mill Creek, lying about half way between Grace, Lower 
Stone and Coldwater churches. 




11. Ministers of THE GERMAN REFORMED CHURCH, Hinke, page 377. 

12. Department of Archives and History, Raleigh, N. C. Copy in hands of author. 



45 






'^■c-a- rA ^y tv^ c '^-eyzi-;' '''^^j^^f;^p-^,f-~^^ t"^ -r^ C3^^ ^^^ ^<i^^3.^ 

Survey of the Rev. Samuel Suther land on Dutch Buffalo Creek 

In the October term of Court, 1771, M. C. Christman states that 
Samuel Suther has paid the sum of one Shilling Prock. being the con- 
sideration money mentioned in the written deed of Loan. On the 
Eighth Day of June, 1769, the Lease on this tract of land is written, 
"Between Michael Christman and Elizabeth his wife of the one part 
and the Reverend Samuel Suther of the said County of the other 
part. . . ." 

It is signed by Lorentz Lingell, Conrad K. C. Carlough, and George 
Tucker, as witnesses, after the signature of Michael Christman. ^^ 

On the Seventeenth Day of June, 1769, the Lease was released and 
the deed for the tract of land put in the name of Samuel Suther, which 
deed is again signed by Michael C. Christman, and witnessed by 
Lorentz Lingle, Conrad C. Carlough, and George Tucker. i^ 

Most likely Suther had been living on the land several years before 
he asked for the Lease, and then purchased it outright, as the early 
settlers were in no great haste to secure deeds to the land as land was 
plentiful. Often several years elapsed after the application was made 
for the title, or deed, to the land, and the date of its issuance. 



13. Office of Register and Recorder, Mecklenburg County, Book 5, page 205. 

14. Office of Register and Recorder, Mecklenburg County, Book, page 207. 



46 



This tract of land is just a bit less than five tenths of a mile from 
the monument which marks the location of the original DUTCH 
BUFFALO CREEK MEETING HOUSE, or CHURCH. It also indi- 
cates that Suther was active in his profession, as teacher and preacher, 
for some years before coming to Coldwater Church. He could easily 
walk, or ride his horse, to the school or Church, where he was serving. 

Suther served the Coldwater church from 1768-1771. Then he went 
to Brick Church, Guilford County, where he served as the first pastor 
of that congregation. He bought a farm there, containing two hundred 
and eighty-eight acres of land.i^ 

He returned to the Coldwater and Grace, Lower Stone, churches, 
1782-1786, showing his concern and interest in this area. 

He went to South Carolina, Orangeburg County, 1786-1788, and 
died there Sept. 28, 1788. He had bought a farm there, of three hun- 
dred and twenty-five acres. We have a photostatic copy of the land 
grant, March third, 1788, "and in the T-^velfth Year of the Indepen- 
dence of the United States of America." The name of his wife appears 
on the U. S. Census report of South Carolina in 1790 as "Widow 
Suder." 

He also bought 138 acres of land on Coldwater Creek, August 7, 
1787, suggesting that he planned to retire to this community.!^ 

We mention the fact that he owned land in these different and 
distant areas, to illustrate the travel that he did, as pasor and teacher, 
in those early and difficult years. 

During the years of his active ministry, with definite dates (fire 
destroyed earlier records and definite dates cannot be established), 
from 1768-1786, he served as pastor of Pilgrim Reformed Church, 
Davidson County. While it was only about five miles from Dutch 
Buffalo Meeting House to Grace Lower Stone, or from Coldwater 
Church to Lower Stone, it was at least forty to forty-five miles to 
Pilgrim Church. How often he went to Pilgrim Church for religious 
services, we do not know. Surely, when he taught school, for a term 
of possibly three to six weeks at the time, he must have remained in 
the community. 

When he was pastor at Brick Church, then Orange County, he con- 
tinued to serve Pilgrim Church— and that meant a distance of about 
forty-five miles. 

"Father Suther was an indefadguable worker. To him is clue largely 
the credit of thoroughly organizing most of the congregations still in 
existence at the formation of the Classis in 1831. . . Lie exerted himself 
to build houses of worship for all the congregations. . . . Mr. Suther 's 

15. Office of Register and Recorder, Orange County, N. C. Book 3, pages 375-376. 

Survey of the Rev. Samuel Suther land on Dutch Buffalo Creek 

16. Office of Register and Recorder, Mecklenburg County, Book 13, page 306. 

47 



parish consisted of that large section of the State now covered by the 
Counties of Alamance, Guilford, Davidson, Rowan, Cabarrus, and 
Stanly. . . . He organized several congregations in this section, and 
preached to them all statedly. "^'^ 

The people of Cabarrus County are indebted to the pastors who 
served the Dutch Buffalo Creek Meeting House, or Church. As we 
know, from that congregation came our Bethel United Church of 
Christ, and the St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church, and, we be- 
lieve, Colchvater Church, and possibly Grace. Lower Stone, which is 
dated as beginning in 1745, the same date gi^•en to our Dutch Buffalo 
Meeting House. 

Thus Samuel Suther, serving the Dutch Buffalo Meeting House, or 
Church, was serving the good folk who later organized and established 
the St. John's Evangelical Lutheran congregation, in 1771, and also 
those of Coldwater Lutheran Church, as well as members of the Bethel 
German Reformed group. All the pastors serving our union Reformed 
and Lutheran congregations were of the Reformed faith until the 
arrival of the Rev. Adolph Nussman in 1773. 

Thus, the good people of Cabarrus County are indebted to this man, 
the Rev. Samuel Suther, possibly more than to any other, for the re- 
ligious and educational influence of his ministry and labors. Our 
unusually fine, stable community, is explained at least in part by the 
dedicated labors and wholesome influence of this minister, who served 
his community well, members of both the Reformed and the Lutheran 
churches, as well as the larger community including all people. 

Although in the above we have given special emphasis to the work 
and zeal of Rev. Samuel Suther we would in no way seek to minimize 
the endeavors of otlier dedicated men ^vho were instrumental in keep- 
ing alive the early Lutheran and German Churches. Several have been 
mentioned in some detail in other parts of this history. Here I would 
like to pay tribute again to The Rev. Christian Theus whose labors 
in those early years prepared the "wav for future success. He and Rev. 
Suther were contemporaries. About the time they finished their labors 
and had gone on into the Church Triumphant, the Rev. Andrew 
Loretz began his great work. W^e believe it can be truthftdly said that 
the present church owes more to these three men than to any others in 
serving the needs of the people and helping establish the congiegations 
in those early }'ears. Of course we would not forget the Rev. George 
Boger. We remember with lasting gratitude his long years of service. 
Coming along a generation later than the above named we realize 
that part of his labors rested on the foundations laid by his three great 
predecessors. 

We are indebted to all of them and their colleagues. They worked 
under most difficult circumstances, but willingly and eagerly as they 
preached the word and helped lay the moral and spiritual founda- 

17. Historic Sketch of the Reformed Church in North Carolina, Welker, pages 27-28. 

48 



tions which undergird and make our communities such fine places to 
live today. 

It is the privilege of the editors of Part I of this history to provide 
the essential background of Bethel United Church of Christ, originally 
Bethel German Reformed Church, as the proper background for the 
history from 1806 to the present which comprises Part II of our com- 
bined work. 

May the commendable achievements of the rich past inspire us to 
a deeper devotion and the earnest endeavor to be worthy of and to 
add to the value of our great heritage. 



MEMBERS OF DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK CHURCH 
WERE DEVOTED TO EACH OTHER 

As we have said, the early history of the German Reformed and the 
German Lutheran churches is inseparable. They came to this area 
together, built homes, and established joint churches and schools. 
Economic necessity may have compelled it, but common sense showed 
the wisdom of it, and their experience brought mutual satisfaction. 

It is interesting to note that, when John Paul Barringer suggested in 
1771 that the Lutherans separate from the union church on Dutch 
Buffalo Creek, and build their own building, many if not all of the 
German Reformed faith went along with the Lutherans to their new 
location and building. Although the Lutherans called their new church 
St. John's, it continued to be known as the Dutch Buffalo Creek Church 
for approximately forty years. That name had come to mean much 
to them, and they were very slow in discontinuing its use. 

Although the union church was divided, as of 1771, we are glad to 
note that there was never any evidence of disharmony, disagreement 
or dissatisfaction. A number of the members of the German Reformed 
faith went along with the Lutheran group to their new building. Their 
names were a part of the roll at St. John's church. The record of their 
baptisms, marriages, death, and attendance at Holy Communion, was 
kept there. Although the Reformed group still regarded themselves as 
members of that faith, they enjoyed congenial fellowship with their 
Lutheran brethren as they continued to worship together. It is evident 
that the affection for each other was deep and mutual. 

We remember, too, that many of both the German Reformed and 
the Lutheran background held services for more than thirty years in 
the homes and barns of the community where Bethel German Re- 
formed Church was established in 1806, and that pastors of both de- 
nominations officiated at these services. 

It is interesting to note that George Boger and his family were a part 
of St. John's Church, which continued to be known as the Dutch 
Buffalo Creek Church at that time, although they regarded themselves 

49 



as members of the Reformed fellowship. He writes in his diary, "After 
attending these instructions six months, I was confirmed in the faith 
of the Evangelical and Reformed Church, at the Communion service 
of Whit Sunday, May 12, 1799. I now had the desire to study Divinity, 
feeling compelled to preach, and believing that I was personally called 
to the Holy Order. "^ Please note that he was confirmed a member of 
the Evangelical Reformed Church. 

He was ordained March 6, 1803. "I was ordained in the name of the 
Holy Trinity, as minister in the Reformed Church. "2 

The pastoral ministrations were recorded in the records of St. John's 
from 1744 until 1806. This illustrates again that the two congregations, 
or groups, worshipped in perfect harmony, and that their denomina- 
tional identity was maintained and respected. 

When the members of the German Reformed Church decided that 
thev would build a church where Bethel is now located, George Boger 
and his family, and others of the German Reformed background, with- 
drew from St. John's to become a part of the new Bethel congregation. 
George Boger was called as their first pastor. Of course we remember 
that Rev. George Boger was ordained March 6, 1803, and from that 
year served as pastor of Bethany Church, Davidson County; Grace, 
"Lower Stone," Rowan County; and New Gilead, Cabarrus County. In 
1806 he became the first pastor of the Bethel German Reformed 
Church. 

A number of Lutherans, too, would not separate from their German 
Reformed friends, and they chose to become a part of the new Bethel 
Church, which, at first, was a union congregation. Neither group really 
wanted to be separated from the other. 

"Evidently Mr. Boger served both Reformed and Lutheran families, 
for in those days the congregation supported the same pastor and was 
generally served by the same officers. In 1806 Christopher Lyerly, 
Lutheran, and Henry Seitz, Reformed, were installed as deacons of 
the congregation. In 1811, when the above officials were elevated to 
the office of elder, John Barrier, Reformed, and William Heynsemann, 
Lutheran, were elected deacons. "^ 

From 1806 to 1871 this relationship continued. In 1872 it was decided 
that the Reformed and the Lutheran congregations should each have 
its own house of worship. In the re-adjustment, the Reformed congre- 
gation retained the old church, and the Lutherans purchased land two 
miles east and erected a new house of worship. Very appropriately, 
they called it, "New Bethel Lutheran Church." At present Bethel 
Lutheran Church is located in Stanly County, about two miles west 
from Richfield, and near the old Misenheimer Springs. 

1. Diary of George Boger, given in Chapter XI. 

2. Ibid. 

3. A Story of Southern Synod, Evangelical and Reformed Church, Peeler, page 160. 

50 



Once again, however, we note the strong ties which bound these 
Christians to one another. Not all of the Lutherans were willing to 
leave the old grounds, and church, and the friendly fellowship which 
had meant so much, but chose to maintain a small Lutheran organiza- 
tion and continue a part of the Bethel German Reformed Church. 
This, of course, called for still further adjustment, which was settled 
by a specially appointed committee from Synod, upon request from 
the local groups, on an equitable basis. The group which remained at 
the old place eventually disbanded.^ 

JOHN PAUL BARRINGER IMMIGRATES TO 
DUTCH BUFFALO CREEK 

As further evidence that the German people were settled along this 
Dutch Buffalo Creek area, we have the facts on the life of John Paul 
Barringer. He was prominent in the life of the Dutch Buffalo Creek 
Church, and recommended that the Lutheran group separate and erect 
their own building, in 1771. 

John Paul Barringer, or Pavdus Barringer, was born in the Duchv of 
Wurtemburg, Germanv, on the 4th. of June, 1721. He was the oldest 
son of a family of six children. Tradition has it that his father's name 
was Wilhelm, and his mother's name was Pauline. 

Nothing is known further of the familv's antecedents bevond the 
tradition common to all its branches— that thev were French Hugenots, 
leaving France sometime in the vear 1600 before the revocation of the 
Edict of Nantes, some going to England and some to Germany. 

John Paul Barrins^er, the founder of the North Carolina familv, and 
the subject of this sketch, left home when just past the age of his 
maioritv, twentv-one. and sailed from Rotterdam for America in the 
shio, "Phoenix," Commander, William Wilson. The ship landed at 
Philadelphia on September 30, 1743. 

Within a vear after his arrival in America, he married Ann Floz (?) 
Fisman, and the young couple settled in the Wyoming Valley of Penn- 
sylvania. Thev remained several vears, and prospered. Two children, 
John and Catherine, were born there. 

During the decade of his arrival, 1740-1750, the tide of migration to 
the south grew stronger, and more and more of the immis^rants to this 
new land were turning to the south. Thus we find that in 1753 John 
and Ann Barringer moved to North Carolina, and settled in the Dutch 
Buffalo Creek community, in Anson Countv, later known as Mecklen- 
burg, and now Cabarrus, near the afterward famous residence, '"Poplar 
Grove." 



4. History of the Lutheran Church in North Carolina. Edited by Jacob L. Morgan, 
D.D., L.L.D., Bachman S. Brown, Jr. D.D., and John Hall, D.D. 

51 



Sometime before he moved to North Carolina, he sent to Germany 
for his parents, and his younger brother and sister. Both his parents 
and sister (?) were buried at sea, but we learn from Rupp's List of 
Immigrants" that Mathias Barringer (Beringer) arrived at the port of 
Philadelphia September 16, 1748, on the ship, "Palina," John Brown, 
Commander, and with him probablv came the daughter of the family. 
Rupp does not record the arrival of George Henry Barringer, but the 
record of his purchasing land in Pennsylvania one year later, after John 
Paul landed, leads to the belief that he came over with John Paul, but 
was not of age. No record seems to have been made of women and 
children. 

From a letter written at eighty years of age, bv Colonel John Barn- 
hardt, (-who knew all the members of the familv). to the honorable 
D. M. Barringer, Ave learn that these children were five in number, two 
boys and three girls. There was George Henrv Barringer, Avho settled 
on Little Dutch Buffalo Creek, tAvo miles south of a place noAv knoAvn 
as Gold Hill, in RoAvan, near Montgomery Countv. There Avas the 
other brother, Mathias Barringer, afterAvards a Captain in the Colonial 
Militia, married a Miss Bushart, and settled in the County of Lincoln, 
now CataAvba County, tAvo miles from the present toAvn of NeAvton. 
During Rutherford's Indian Campaign, in 1776, this Mathias Bar- 
ringer, Avith five other members of his companv, Avere ambushed and 
killed bv the Cherokee Indians. Some vears later, a monument Avas 
erected in their memorv in the Court House Square at NcAvton. N. C, 
where it still stands today. 

The three daughters Avere married as folloAvs: Anna Marie Barringer, 
to Christian Barnhardt; Catherine married Christian Obensheim, Oa^- 
enshine, or Overcash; and the younger married Nicholas Cook. 

John Paul Barringer played a heroic role in behalf of American 
independence. HoAvever, he never learned to speak English. During 
the skirmish, he Avas captured by the British, and confined to prison 
at Camden, S. C. He is said to be the only one of his company of 
prisoners that returned home. 

John Paul Barringer was the promoter of the formation of CataAvba 
County, Avhich Avas taken from Mecklenburg County in 1792. He Avas 
sent to the North Carolina Legislature to represent the neAv County 
in 1793. 

A short Avhile before the Revolutionary War, his Avife died. In 1777 
he married Miss Catherine BlackAvelder. They had five sons and four 
daughters. The Barringer family has been in all the Avars of our 
country. 

John Paul, Mathias and George Henry fought the Indians, and Avere 
in the Revolutionary War. His sons, John, and General Paul Barringer, 
were in the ^Var of 1812 (?) (torn off). A son of General Paul, General 
Rufus Barringer, Avon fame in the Confederate Army during the ^V^ar 

52 



between the States. The records indicate that many others, likewise, 
were involved in these wars. 

Many of the growing Barringer family were engaged in the Spanish- 
American War, although we find no record of any special service. 

Few families have such a record as here is briefly recounted in these 
four generations: 

First: The ancestor, John Paul Barringer, Revolutionary Patriot. Sec- 
ond: the sons, Daniel I. Barringer, of North Carolina and Tennessee; 
and General Paul Barringer, of the War of 1812, business and political 
leader. Third: the granclsons, Daniel Morean, Minister to Spain and 
citizen of Raleigh, N. C; Paul Brandon Barringer, the Mississippi 
pioneer; William Barringer, the great preacher; Rufus Barringer, the 
Confederate Brigadier General and politician; and Victor Clay Bar- 
ringer, the scholar and diplomat. Fourth: the great grandsons, Lewis 
W. Barringer, lawyer; Daniel Morean Barringer, Jr., Lawyer and 
geologist, and expert on the laws of mining; Colonel John Alston 
Barringer of the Greensboro, N. C, bar; Dr. Paul B. Barringer, of the 
University of Virginia faculty; and scores of others. 

John Paul Barringer was a devoted Lutheran. He was attracted to 
the Buffalo Creek area because of the Dutch Buffalo Creek Church, or 
Meeting House, well known before his arrival in 1753. He gave the 
land, and most of the money, to erect the first building for the historic 
St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church, which was an outgrowth from 
the original Dutch Buffalo Creek Church. The original church was 
located about three miles from the present church, in what is now 
Cabarrus County. 

In appreciation for his leadership, and generous support of the 
relocation and building program, the congregation had a high seat 
built in the church for him and his family. 

He died in 1807. 



53 



RECORD OF BIRTHS AND BAPTISMS 

Taken from records of Bethel (Bear Creek) German Reformed Church — now United 
Church of Christ, Stanly County, North Carolina. 

"John" Old spelling ofjohn 



BIRTH & 
BAPTISM 


PARENTS 


CHILDREN 


SPONSORS 


Dec. 2, 1817 
May 10, 1818 


David Moose 


Salley 


Johu Berger Sc w. 


Jan. 4, 1818 
May 10, 1818 


George Seits 


Rachel 


Parents 


June 27, 1817 
May 10, 1818 


Henry Scheck 


Henry 


Wm. Lauter & w. 


July 3, 1817 
May 10, 1818 


Peter Driesztavris 


Jonathan 
John 


Parents 


March 4, 1818 
May 10, 1818 


George Misenheimer Eisem 
(I suppose Isom is meant) 


Parents 


Mar. 14, 1818 
May 30, 1818 


Daniel Reitenaur 


Betsey Lovinia 


Parents 


Dec. 8. 1817 
May 30, 1818 


Martin Flahn 


Rachel 


Christina Hahn 
(Hahu) 


March 1, 1818 
June 28, 1818 


Peter Troutman 


Catharine 


Parents 


Apr. 22, 1818 
July 12, 1818 


George Soger 


Anna Rosina 


Parents 


March 12, 1818 
July 12, 1818 


Johu Leib 


Andrew 


Parents 


March 16, 1818 
July 12, 1818 


Jacob Uty 


Elizabeth 


Christopher Lefler 


Sept. 1, 1818 
Nov. 8, 1818 


Johu Earnhardt 


Matthias 


Parents 


Sept. 7, 1818 
Nov. 8, 1818 


Johu Lauter 


Matthias 


Parents 


July 21, 1812 
Dec. 6, 1818 




Jane 


Daniel Dry 


March 9, 1819 
May 2, 1819 


Jacob Leyerla 


Betsey Lovinia 


Matthias Sides 


Feb. 1. 1819 
May 2, 1819 


John Sides 


Letty 


David Moose 
(Devid) 


Feb. 9, 1819 
July 25, 1819 


Philip Wagner 


Johu 


Parents 


May 22, 1819 
July 25, 1819 


Daniel Sides 


Wesley 


Parents 


Feb. 8, 1819 
July 25, 1819 


Jacob Boshart 


Daniel 


Parents 


March 17, 1819 
July 25, 1819 


Jacob Earnhardt 


George Hector 


Geo. Earnhardt 


Feb. 22, 1819 
Aug. 22, 1819 


George Esfort 


Esther 


Jacob Eafort & w. 



54 



Nov. 4, 1819 
Dec. 12, 1819 


Adam Heffely 


Daniel 


Parents 


Nov. 5, 1819 
Dec. 26, 1819 


John Ridenhour 


Johu Wiley 


Gertrude Sides 


Dec. 25, 1819 
March 12, 1820 


Martin Hahn 


Henry 


Henry Hahn 
& w. 


Apr. 9, 1820 
Apr. 23, 1820 


Daniel D. Ridenhour 


Mary Ann 


Parents 


May 27, 1819 
Apr. 23, 1820 


Jacob Udy 


Lucy 


Chris. Lefler 


Apr. 18, 1819 
Apr. 29, 1820 


Jacob Hagler 


Dorothy 


Parents 


March ? 1820 


Moses Ridenhour 
Jacob Fisher 


Allison 
Elizabeth Lovina 


Elizabeth Pence 


March, 10, 1820 


Parents 


Feb. 19, 1820 


George Sides 
Henry Shoe 


Seyle 

Martin Monroe 


Henry Sides 


? 
July 30, 1820 


Johu Barger 


Dec. 1, 1819 
Dec. 25, 1820 


Henry Louder 
(Lowder?) 


Harris 


Fatlier 


Aug. 21, 1820 
Dec. 25, 1820 


Johu Barger 


Elizabeth 


Johu Barger, Sr. 

& w. 


June 19, 1820 
Dec. 25, 1820 


John Sides 


Matthias 


Chris. Sides 


? 
Aug. 29, 1821 


Christopher Sides 


Riley 


John Barger 

& w. 


Oct. 29, 1821 
Apr. 5, 1822 


Daniel Moose 


Jacob Englehart 


Parents 


Sept. 17. 1821 
Apr. 5, 1822 


George Earnhardt 


Johu Matthias 


Parents 


Oct. 6, 1821 


Moses Ridenhour 


Lydia Lovinia 


Johu Ridenhour 

&: w. 

Elizabeth Ridenhour 


Feb. 12, 1822 
May 5, 1822 


Daniel Sides 


Betsey livinia 


Feb. 5, 1821 
May 5, 1822 


George Miller 


Eben W. 


John Ridenhour 


Nov. 13, 1821 


George Sides 


Caswell 


Parents 


March 10, 1820 


Jacob Fisher 


Betsey Lovinia 


Parents 


May 5, 1816 


George Sides 


Polly Philana 


Parents 


March 23, 1822 
June 16, 1822 


Daniel Ridenhour 


Christena Carolina 


Parents 


March 15, 1822 
July 28, 1822 


David Fink 


Ann Catherine 


Johu Barger & w. 


Feb. 17, 1822 
July 28, 1822 


Johu Barger 


Jacob 


Chris. Sides & w. 



55 



Apr. 6, 1822 
July 28, 1822 

Jan. 7, 1823 
Feb. 2, 1823 

Aug. 10. 1822 
Feb. 2, 1823 

June 6, 1822 
Feb. 2, 1823 

Nov. 7, 1822 
Feb. 2, 1823 

Nov. 18, 1822 
Feb. 2, 1823 

Oct. 28, 1822 
March 16, 1823 

Jan. 16, 1823 
March 16, 1823 

June 30, 1821 
March 16, 1823 

Feb. 22, 1823 
March 27, 1823 

Jan. 13, 1823 
March 28, 1823 

Feb. 12, 1823 
March 28, 1823 

March 15. 1823 
May 18, 1823 

Jan. 9, 1823 
May 18, 1823 

These were baptized as adults: 

Mary Palmer, b. Aug. 1, 1821, bapt. Apr. 21, 1838. 

Charles, s. of Geo. &: Esther Lefler, b. Dec. 25, 1840, bapt. Apr. 

W. L. Daniel, no birthdate, bapt. Oct. 17, 1873. 

Johu T. Russell b. July 2, 1855, bapt. Aug. 17, 1880. 

Walter M. Kirk, baptized .Aug. 19, 1880. 

Walter J. Edwards, baptized Aug. 5, 1888. 

Jan. 29, 1823 Leonard Sides George Miller 

May 18, 1823 

Dec. 5, 1822 
June 15, 1823 

Apr. 5. 1823 
June 15, 1823 

Apr. 27, 1823 
June 15, 1823 

Apr. 11, 1823 
June 15, 1323 

Mav 20, 1823 
June 15, 1823 

July 5, 1822 
June 15, 1825 



Mathias Sides 

Henrv Plvler 

Jonathan 

Misenlieimer 

Philip "Wagner 
Christopher Sides 
George Misenheiraer 
Johu Drv 
Mark Honicut 
Nathaniel Allman 
Jacob Fisher 
David Moose 
George Earnhardt 
Peter Troutman 
Adam Richev 



Barbara 

Tobias 

Catherine Ann 

Sally Lovinia 

Even 

Alexander 

Martin "Wiley 

Johti "Wiley 

Anna 

Johu Sandy 

Mary Ann 

Julia Ann 

Eve 

Caroline 



Barbara Moose 

Leonard Plvler & w. 

Parents 

Parents 

Henrv Plvler 

Parents 

Martin Dry & w. 

Johu Dry &: w. 

Catharine Sell 

Parents 

Jacob Leyerle 

Father 

Parents 

Parents 

'56. 



Samuel Barger Elizabeth Barger 

(Mary Goodman, Aug. 14, 1820) 

George Lefler 
(Esther Sides) 



Daniel Sides 
Johti Earnhardt 



Caleb Leffler 

Juliana 

Peter Theophilous 

John ^Vm. 



Da\id Mvers 

(Rainy Shoe 5-15-1821) 

David Shoe Anna Peggy 



Parents 

Jno. Barger & wiie 

Jno. Ridenhour & 
wife 

Mathias Lefler & 
wife 

Parents 

Johu Shoe, Sr. 
Peggy Myers 



56 



July 16, 1823 
1823 

Apr. 26, 1816 
Oct. 12, 1823 

July 13, 1823 Moses Ridenhour 



Tobias Miller Lucy Anna 

(Rosena Fisher? July 16, 1816) 

Tobias Miller Wesley 



Archibald Monrow 



Aug. 25, 1823 

Nov. 27, 1823 
Dec. 25, 1823 

Oct. 5, 1823 
Dec. 25, 1823 

July 4, 1821 

July 27, 1823 
Nov. 19, 1823 

Sept. 12, 1823 
Dec. 25, 1823 

Oct. 6, 1823 
Dec. 25, 1823 

June 30, 1823 

Aug. 8, 1823 
Feb. 6, 1824 

Dec. 25, 1823 
Feb. 6, 1824 

Dec. 13, 1823 
Feb. 6, 1824 

Aug. 8, 1823 
Feb. 6, 1824 

Jan. 12, 1824 
March 7, 1824 

Jan. 8, 1824 
March 7, 1824 

Jan. 23, 1824 
March 7, 1824 

Sept. 22, 1823 
Apr. 2, 1824 

March 17, 1824 
May 9, 1824 

March 10, 1824 
May 9, 1824 

March 27, 1824 
May 29, 1824 

March 12, 1824 
May 29, 1824 

Apr. 4, 1824 
June 13, 1824 

March 22, 1824 
July 16, 1824 



John Barrear Johu 

(Esther Sides? Dec. 4," 1816) 

Matthias Leffler Julia 

(Barbara Moose 10-1-1821) 

Daniel Stikelether Elizabeth 



Lovinia 



S. Hunicut 
Peter Gulp 
Thomas Leffler 
Lydia (Child) 

Henry Shoe 
Leonard Plyler 



Lydia 

Renia 

Daniel Wiley 

Jacob Leyerle 
(Father) 

Leonard 
Edmond 
Elizabeth 



Abraham Leffler Christopher 

(md. Christena Ence 8-18-1809) 

Martin Randleman Margaret Elizabeth 
(Experience Harris) 

Samuel Barger Geo. Henry 

Matthais Sides Esther 

(Betsy Moose? 9-26-1818) 

Aaron Ridenhour Harris Monrow 
(Caroline Miller March 27, 1823) 

Daniel Dry Henry 

Leonard Seitz Buhman Richman 

(Richmond?) 

George Dry Moses M. 

(Polly Sides Nov. 11, 1822) 

Gonathan M-himer George Martin 
(Sarah Miller, Apr. 25, 1820) 

William Wagoner Christopher 

George Sides Elizabeth 

(Betsey Lyle Mar. 12, 1813) 



Parents 



Jno. Ridenhour & 
wife 

George Misenheimei 
& wife 



Jacob B. 



Peggy Barringer 

Sally Dove 

Parents 

Jacob Eudy 

David Moose 8: 
wife 

Leonard Plyler & 
wife 

Leonard Plyler 

Henry Shoe 

Parents 

Parents 

Geo. 



David Udy 



Jacob Monrow 



Jacob Lye (Lyerle?) 

Dorothy Harris 
(Grandmother) 

Parents 
Parents 

Chi ? 

Parents 
Parents 
Parents 
Parents 



57 



June 28, 1824 
July 16, 1824 

Nov. 7, 1824 

Oct. 20, 1824 
Dec. 1, 1824 

Sept. 26, 1824 
Dec. 1, 1824 

Nov. 6, 1824 
Jan. 1, 1825 

Dec. 8, 1824 
Feb. 5, 1825 

Feb. 5. 1825 

Nov. 27, 1824 
Feb. 27, 1825 

Sept. 11, 1824 
Feb. 27, 1825 

Jan. 8. 1825 
Feb. 27, 1825 

Jan. 28, 1825 
Apr. 26, 1825 

Jan. 20. 1825 
May 21, 1825 

Apr. 24, 1825 
May 21, 1825 

Apr. 6, 1825 
May 21, 1825 

Feb. 3, 1825 
May 21, 1825 

Jan. 25, 1825 
June 12, 1825 

Feb. 14, 1824 
July 17, 1824 

Feb. 3, 1824 
July 17, 1824 

Apr. 19, 1824 
July 17, 1824 

Apr. 20. 1824 
June 19, 1824 

May 11, 1825 
July 24, 1825 

Apr. 13, 1825 
Sept. 11, 1825 

Aug. 11, 1824 
Sept. 11, 1825 

Oct. 4, 1825 
Nov., 1825 

Nov. 30, 1825 
Feb. 26, 1826 



\Vm. Z. Harris 
(War 1812) 

Johu Lowder 



Sarah \eome 
Suffe (Sophia) 

Johu Moose George 

Johu Pack (Peck?) Elias 

Jacob Lewis 
Daneal 



Abraliam Shefer 
(Shaver? 

Henry Plyler 



Ch. Sides, Jr. Moses 

(Catherine Penninger Apr. 2, 1820) 

David Moose Lcdia Barbara 

(Rachel Sides 3-20-1813) 

Jacob Eudy Ester 

Jacob Fisher Caroline- 

George Misenheimer Daneal 

Peggy Caroline 
Jacob 'Wilson 



Johu Dry 
(War 1812) 

Daniel Sides 



Daniel Sides, Sen. 

Jno Sell 

Jno. C. Barnhart 

Adam Ridche 
(■\Var 1812) 

Matthais Dry 



Ester 

Elizabeth 

.Anna Margaret 

Daneal 

Ardche Monrow 



John Melcher Eli Xoa 

(Sophia Dry Nov. 13, 1819) 

Moses Ridenno^ver Elizabeth Caroline 
(Son of Johu b. March 26, 1799) 

George Doup Sallean 
(Done) 

Martin Randleraaii Jacob Martnen 

^Villiani Green AVilliam Efram 

Jacob Lyerle Hector 

Mathias Sides Daniel S. 



Parents 

Parents 

Parents 

Parents 

Parents 

Christopher Sides 
& wife 

Daniel Sides &: wife 

jno. Moose S; wife 

George Lefler S: 
wife 

Parents 

Parents 

Parents 

Chr. Sides & wife 

Ester Leffler 

Parents 

Parents 

Parents 

Parents 

The Mother 

Ridenhowe & 
Elizabeth Hefly 

Leonard Plyler Sc 
wife 

Parents 

The Mother 

Parents 

David Moose &.- 
wife 



58 



Dec. 8, 1825 
Feb. , 1826 


Mathias Lefler 


Eli 


Parents 


Dec. 15, 1825 
Feb. 26, 1826 


Aaron Ridenhour 


Barbara Ann 


Parents 


Dec. 27, 1825 
Feb. 26, 1826 


George Leffler 


Daniel Mondrow 


Daniel Sides Sc 
wife 


Dec. 4, 1825 
Feb. 26, 1826 


Daniel Stikelether 
(Christine Barringer, 


Susanna 
Dec. 24, 1819) 


Parents 


May 8, 1826 
May 28, 1826 


Charles Flick 


Elizabeth Caline 


Daniel Redche & 
wife 


April 28, 1826 
May 28, 1826 


George Misenheimer 


Green 


Parents 


Jan. 19, 1826 
July 9, 1826 


Jacob Shandy 


John Nuten 
(Nathan) 


The Mother 


June 9, 1826 
July 28, 1826 


George Barnhart Jacob Columbus 
(m. Martha Reed Dec. 20, 1820) 


Parents 


May 5, 1826 
July 28, 1826 


George Sides 


Eldridge 


Leonard Sides &: 
wife 


May 16, 1826 
Aug. 6, 1826 


Samuel Barrear 
(Barger) 


Polle 


Mathias Barrear & 
wife 


July 4, 1826 
Sept. 9, 1826 


John Moose 


Calib Augusta 


Parents 


May 23, 1826 
Oct. 8, 1826 


Jonathan 

Misenheimer 


John Mathais 


Parents 


Aug. 5, 1826 
Nov. 19, 1826 


Jacob Barrear 
(Polly Holacher mar. 


Edmond B. 
Sept. 19, 1825) 


Parents 


Feb. 12, 1826 
Nov. 19, 1826 


David Link 


Polle Maria 


Pena Sail 


Aug. 14, 1826 
Nov. 19, 1826 


Christopher Sides 


Elizabeth Caroline 


David Moose & 
wife 


Sept. 20, 1826 
Feb. 11, 1827 


George Dry 


Adam 


Martin Dry & wife 


Nov. 7, 1826 
Feb. 11, 1827 


Mathias Barringer 


Paul Manrow 


Parents 


Sept. 21, 1826 
Feb. 11, 1827 


John Lotin ? 


Martin 


The Mother 


Jan. 31, 1827 
March 25, 1827 


Jacob Fresher 
(Fisher?) 


Polle 


Parents 


Dec. 6, 1826 
March 25, 1827 


Johu Shue 


Henry (C. S. A.) 


Christopher Sides & 
wife 


Feb. 20, 1827 
March 25, 1827 


S(olomon) Ritenower 


Franklin Alexander 


Parents 


Feb. 6, 1827 
March 25, 1827 


Johu Pack 


Edmond 


Parents 


Jan. 28. 1827 
March 25, 1827 


Henray Plyler 


Edmond 


Mathais Sides & 
wife 


Jan. 13, 1827 
March 25, 1827 


David Ude 


Conrad Martin 


Parents 


May 13, 1826 
Apr. 16, 1827 


Daniel Moose 
(War 1812) 


Sally Angert 


Parents 



59 



Oct. 9, 1826 
Apr. 16, 1827 


Johu Barger 


Mathias A. 

(G.S.A.? Katchold 


Johu Shue 
Harbor 1864) 


Dec. 30. 1826 
Apr. 16, 1827 


Adam Redchy 
(Ritchy) 


Johu 


Parents 




Johu Bowen 


Polly Maria 


Parents 


Apr. 16, 1827 


Feb. 7, 1827 
Mav 21. 1827 


Johu C. Barnhartt 
(War 1812?) 


Rosina Addaline 


Parents 


April 4, 1S27 
May 2;!, 1M27 


Jacob Leyerley 


Suffa 


Parents 


Oct. 16, 1826 
May 23, 1827 


Jacob Udy 


Gasonina Mariah 


Parents 


Dec. 9, 1826 
June 17, 1827 


James Hunne}cut 


Saha Elisabeth 


Parents 


Apr. 13, 1827 
July 29, 1827 


Daniel Sides 


Litty E\erline 


Geo. Lefler ^:>: 
■wife 


May 18, 1827 
July 29, 1827 


Da\'id Moose Jacob 
(Rachel Sides? 3-20-1813) 


Martias Sides & 
wife 


June 4. 1827 
July 29, 1827 


Leonard Sides 


Anna 


Parents 


Mav 4. 1827 
July 29, 1827 


Moses Ridenhcuer 


Moses Green 


Parents 


Apr. 17, 1827 
July 29, 1827 


Daniel Sides 


Noah 


Martin Dry &.- 
■wife 


Aug. 3, 1827 
Sept. 9, 1827 


Jacob Shandy 


Rideh Moriah 


Xancy Shandy 


Julv 19, 1827 
Sept. 9, 1827 


\Vm. G. Harris 
(^Var 1812) 


\Vm. Clinton 


Parents 


Dec. 22, 1826 
Sept. 9, 1827 


Johu Melchor 


Anna Barbara 


Suffa Melchor 


Sept. 6. 1827 
Oct. 20, 1827 


Math. Lefler 


Jehu Eprom 


Parents 


Julv 28, 1827 
Oct. 20, 1827 


Johu Sell 


Jno. Paulus 


Parents 


Nov. 16. 1827 
Jan. 1. 1828 


George Carker 


Grissa (Christena) 


Parents 


Aug. 27, 1827 
Jan. 1, 1828 


Thomas Lefler 


Elizabeth Adilene 


Parents 


Feb. 28, 1827 
Jan. 13, 1828 


David Gulp 

(Gatherine Stires 


'W'm. Edivard 
m. 3-6-1826) 


Parents 


Nov. 6, 1827 
Apr. 5, 1828 


Johu Lo^vder 


E\e Gaty 


Parents 


Mav 15, 1827 
Apr. 5, 1828 


Bar Huneycut 


Sally 


Henrv Plyler &; 
wife 


Nov. , 1827 

Apr. 5, 1828 


Ghristopher Sides 


Mathias 


Ghrist Sides &: 
ivife 


Feb. 21. 1828 
Apr. 6, 1828 


\Vm. Hefley 


Wilson 


Parents 


Jan. 26, 1828 
May 18, 1828 


Mathias Sides 


Salla Anna 


Sofa Sides 



60 



Apr. 20, 1828 
May 18, 1828 


Solomon Ridenour 


Pammilton Lafay 


tte Parents 


June 24, 1827 
Aug. 10, 1828 


Jacob Kanoy 


Nelly Caroline 


Parents 


June 9, 1828 
Sept. 21. 1828 


Jonason Misenheimer Daniel Monrow 


Parents 


July 7, 1828 
Sept. 21, 1828 


Aaron Ritinghour 


John 


Parents 


July 23, 1828 
Nov. 2, 1828 


George Leffler 


William 


Nicholms Lefler & 
wife 


Aug. 21, 1828 
Nov. 2, 1828 


Mathew Barringer 


Caty Caroline 


Parents 


Aug. 13, 1828 
Nov. 26, 1828 


Levy Harky 


Wilson Monrow 


Parents 


March 8, 1828 
Nov. 26, 1828 


David Link 


Joseph Wilson 


Parents 


July 23, 1828 
Jan. 25, 1829 


George Barnhart 


Margaret Amonds 


Parents 


Oct. 21, 1828 
Jan. 25, 1829 


Moses Ritinghour 


Marian 


Parents 


Dec. 1, 1828 
Feb. 13, 1829 


Nicholous Lefler 


Julius Alexander 


Parents 


Feb. 25, 1826 
Apr. 18, 1829 


Wm. Frances 


Pessenbey 
(Personby) 


Henry Troutman &: 
wife 


Dec. 21, 1828 
Apr. 18, 1829 


Henry Troutman 


Saha (Sarah) 


Parents 


Dec. 25, 1828 
Apr. 18, 1829 


Daniel Sides 


Linda 


Nicolas Lefler & 
wife 


May 18, 1828 
May 24, 1829 


Daniel Sticklacher 
(Christina Barringer, 


Milla Salina (Amel 
Dec. 24, 1819) 


ia) Parents 


Oct. 13, 1829 
May 24, 1829 


Wm. Peacock Sanda 
(Amelia Ludwick Mar. 13, 1821) 


Geo. Dry Sc wife 


Dec. 26, 1828 
May 31, 1829 


Geo. Sides 


Charity 


Charity Sides 


Apr. 20, 1829 
May 31, 1829 


Jno. Randlenian 


Daniel Harris 


W. Ritnigham k 
wife 


Feb. 13, 1829 
May 31, 1829 


Jacob Udy 


William 


Elisabeth Harky 


March 28, 1829 
May 31, 1829 


John Peck, Sr. 


Caty Carl in a 


Parents 


Apr. 10, 1829 
May 31, 1829 


Aaron Udy -^ 


Daniel Rila 

(Riley) 


Parents 




Michael Sides 

(Mary Hefler? 2-23-18 


Michel 

28) 


Thas. Lefler & 
wife 


July 19, 1829 


Nov. 23, 1828 
Aug. 30, 1829 


George Dry 

(Polly Sides Mar. Nov 


Daniel 
. 11, 1822) 


Parents 


July 2, 1829 
Aug. 30, 1829 


H. Plyler 


John 


Suffa Sides 


July 2, 1829 
Aug. 30, 1829 


Geo. Misenheimer 


Pagga 
(Rebecca) 


Parents 



61 



June 5, 1829 
Aug. 30, 1829 


Nelson Sides 


Daniel Alexander 


Parents 


Aug. 2, 1829 
Sept. 12, 1829 


David Udy 


Paul 


Parents 


Sept. 14, 1829 
Nov. 22, 1829 


Math. Lefler 


Jacob Monrow 


Parents 


Aug. 14, 1829 
Nov. 28, 1829 


John Barger 


Sanda 

(Alexander) 


Sufa Sides 


Nov. 15. 1829 
Jan. 3, 1830 


Levi Harchey 


Daniel Reyle 

(Riley 


Parents 


Feb. 21, 1829 
Jan. 3, 1830 


Daniel Sides 


Christopher 


Mathias Sides & 
^vife 


Oct. 27, 1827 
Jan. 3, 1830 


Johu Melchor 


Pagy Maria 
(Rebecca) 


Parents 


Oct. 10, 1S29 
March 7, 1830 


Daniel M. Dry Mara An 

(Nelle Sassamon 9-19-1828?) 


Parents 


Aug. 13, 1828 
Apr. 4, 1830 


Johu Laton 


Francis Alexander 


Parents 


Jan. 21, 1830 
Apr. 4, 1830 


Johu Moose 


Daniel Monrow 


Parents 


March 13, 1830 
May 22, 1830 


George Carker 


Barbara 


Parents 


Sept. 20, 1829 
June 6, 1830 


Daniel Moose 
(Elizabeth Miller? 


Elisabeth 
3-28-1818) 


Parents 


Jan. 14, 1830 
July 4, 1830 


"\Vm. Peacock 


Sally Caroline 


Jacob Shoe & 
wife 


March 9, 1829 
July 4, 1830 


Frederick Myers 
(Sophia Plyer 2- 


Crisy Malindv 
■1-1822) 


Caty Plyler 


May 30, 1830 
July 4, 1830 


Jacob Leyerle 


Paggy 


Parents 


Feb. 27, 1830 
July 4, 1830 


David Moose 


Esther 


Henrv Plyler & 
wife 


Aug. 30, 1830 
Sept. 8, 1830 


Mathias Seits 


Elisabeth 


David Moose 


Nov. 30, 1829 
Oct. 3, 1830 


David Link 


Eve Sallina 


Henry Shoe & 
wife 


Sept. 2, 1830 
Oct. 3, 1830 


Charles Ritchv 


Plessent 


Charles Frick &.- 
wife 


Aug. 14, 1830 
Oct. 3, 1830 


Johu Sell 


Christina 


Parents 


June 9, 1830 
Oct. 3, 1830 


Charles Frick 


Delindy 


Charles Ritchey & 
wife 


June 10, 1830 
Oct. 3, 1830 


Johu Shoe 


Polly 


Polly Shoe 


Sept. 1, 1829 
Nov. 7, 1830 


Jacob Canoy 


Cata Elisabeth 


Martin Dry &: 
^\•ife 


June 16, 1830 
Nov. 7, 1830 


Wm. Hefley 


Richard Stanton 


Parents 


Aug. 26, 1830 
Nov. 7, 1830 


George Barnhart 


Henrv Wm. 


Parents 



62 



Aug. 4, 1830 
Nov. 7, 1830 

Oct. 6, 1830 
Dec. 4, 1830 

Sept. 28, 1830 
Dec. 4, 1830 

Dec. 4, 1830 
Feb. 6, 1831 

?-;ov. 10, 1830 
March 5, 1831 

Jan. 14. 1331 
March 5, 1831 

Jan. 21, 1831 
Apr. 3, 1831 

Oct. 6, 1830 
Apr. 3, 1831 

Apr. 22, 1830 
Apr. 3, 1831 

Mar. 21, 1831 

Mar. 5, 1831 
May 12. 1831 

End of page 16 

May 7. 1829 
May 15, 1831 

, 1831 

May 15, 1831 

May 7, 1829 
May 15, 1831 

Apr. 25, 1831 
June 5, 1831 

May 6, 1830 

March 27, 1831 
Aug. 19, 1831 

Aug. 6, 1830 
Sept. 4, 1831 

July 14, 1830 
Sept. 4, 1831 

Dec. 11, 1830 
Sept. 4, 1831 

Aug. 30, 1831 
Oct. 1, 1831 

July 3, 1830 
Oct. 1, 1831 

Aug. 3, 1831 
Nov. 6, 1831 

Aug. 22, 1831 
Nov. 6, 1831 

Aug. 31, 1831 
Nov. 6, 1831 



Martian Dry Eliza Clementine 

Nelson Seity (?) Ransom 

Daniel Seitz Daniel A. 

Jacob Shue Echnund Monrow 

Mathe'i\' Barringer Lity Christina 
(Ludia) 

George Moose Daniel Monrow 

(Mariah Peck 2-26-1830) 

Micliael Hefley Margaret 

(Barbara Lype Feb. 13, 1830) 

Adam Ridchey Elizabeth 

Jonathan Misonhimer Jonathan Harris 



Henry Plyler 

has German 
J. Belt 

J. Belt 

Thomas Lefflcr 

Jacob Harkey, Jr. 



Sirous Clinton 
Polly 

Thomas Lester 
Gottlieg Heilig 
Gottlieb Riley 
Adam Flias 



Geo. Gulp, Jr. Mavriann 

(Polly Barrier 2-9-1831) 



George Dry 
(Folly Sides) 



Christopher 
Jehu Melcher Colip A. 

George Gulp Eve C. 

Mathias Barringer, Jr. George A. 
Georo-e Meisenheimer Elizabeth 



John Laten 
Daniel Dry 
Johu Louder 
Philip Ridenhour 



Lidia Gillaim 

Sally 

Daniel 

Emilia Elmiah 
(Amelia) 



Parents 

Parents 

Dan Kercher 

Parents 

Parents 

Parents 

Parents 

Parents 

Paients 

Parents 

Bavid Moose &: 
wife 

Wilhelm 

Kallfleish 

W. Kallfleish 

Parents 

Parents 

Johu Barger S: 
wife 

Parents 
Paients 
Parents 
Parents 
Parents 
Mother 
Parents 
Parents 



Aaren Ridenjour 
& wife 



63 



Oct. 1, 1831 
xNov. 7, 1831 


Mathias Lefler 


Marian 


Jacob Lyerly & 
wife 


Sept. 19, 1831 
Nov. 6, 1831 


Daniel Carker 


George Christopher 


Christopher Sides & 
wife 


Sept. 6, 1831 
Nov. 6, 1831 


Christopher Sides 


Milas 


Henrv Shoe & 


Oct. 2, 1829 
Nov. 6, 1831 


Christopher Sides 


Johu 


Parents 


Sept. 10, 1831 
Nov. 6, 1831 


Levi Harkey 


PoIIv Malora 
(Malona) 


Parents 


Nov. 28, 1831 
March 3, 1832 


Johu Udy 


\Vm. Monrow 


Parents 


Jan. 6, 1832 
March 3, 1832 


Henry Lipe 


Martin 


Parents 


Jan. 9, 1832 
March 3, 1832 


Solomon Ridenhower Daniel Monrow 


Parents 


Jan. 7, 1832 
March 3, 1832 


Jacob Shue 


Julaan 


Henry Shue S; 
wife 


Jan. 24. 1832 
March 25, 1832 


M. Sides 

(Polly Shew Jan. 20, 


Catv 
1831)' 


Henrv Shue S: 


Dec 15, 1831 
March 25, 1832 


Jno. Barger 


Saly 


Frederick Barger 
■isife 


Feb. 14, 1832 
June 24, 1832 


Daniel Sides 


Henry Clinton 


Mary Sides 
(wido^s•) 


Feb. 26, 1832 
June 24, 1832 


M. Ridinghower 


Maca Mahulda 

(Martha) 


Parents 


Feb. 23, 1832 
June 24, 1832 


Nelson Sides 


Joseph Monrow 


Parents 


Sept. 7, 1831 
July 22, 1832 


Daniel Sides 


Charls 


Geo. Drye S: 
■^vife 


March 27, 1832 
Aug. 26, 1832 


Adam Ridchy 


Edmond 


Parents 


Aug. 9, 1832 
Oct. 3, 1832 


Mathias Dr\' 


\Vm. Rufus 


Parents 


Aug. 19, 1832 
Nov . 24, 1832 


Johu Moose 


Elisabeth 


Parents 


Sept. 24, 1832 
Nov. 24, 1832 


Geo. Moose 


Pegga Carolina 


Parents 


Dec. 22, 1832 
Jan. 27, 1833 


Jacob Lyerly 


Christopher 


Parents 


Jan. 10, 1832 
Feb. 24, 1833 


Johu Peck 


Elisabeth 


Parents 


Feb. 7, 1833 
March 24, 1833 


George Gulp 


Barbara Maria 
(IM. Solomon Dry) 


Parents 


Jan. 13, 1833 
Apr. 27, 1833 


Johu Barger 


Esther 


Sally Sides 


Apr. 6, 1833 
May 26, 1833 


Mathias Barringer 


Amilia Selina 


Parents 


June 27, 1832 
May 26, 1833 


Jonathan Misinheimer Kinchen Stokes 


Parents 



64 



Feb. 22, 1833 
May 26, 1833 


Johu Shoe 


Sally 


Parents 


July 25, 1832 
Aug. 25. 1833 


Charles Frick 


Daniel 


Jno. Ridenhour & 
wife 


Aug. 16, 1832 
Aug. 25, 1833 


Johu Melcher 


Johu Valendine 


Parents 


Apr. 11, 1833 
Aug. 25, 1833 


David Moose 


Christopher 


Parents 


May 23, 1833 
Aug. 25, 1833 


Christopher Sides 


Jacob 


Geo. Dry 


Apr. 16, 1833 
Aug. 25, 1833 


Johu C. Barnhart 


Mary Caroline 
(m. Fisher) 


Parents 


Sept. 16, 1832 
Oct. 26, 1833 


Daniel Moose 


George 


Parents 


Sept. 10, 1833 
Nov. 27, 1833 


Henry Plyler 


Esther 


Elisabeth Moose 


Sept. 14, 1833 
Dec. 15, 1833 


George Harker 
(Carker) 


Martin William 






Nov. 30, 1833 
Feb. 15, 1834 


Solomon Ridenhour 


Anderson Josiah 


Parents 


Jan. 16, 1834 
Feb. 15, 1834 


Philip Ridenhour 


Julius Carellons 


Parents 


June 10, 1833 
Feb. 16, 1834 


Mathias Sides 


Johu 


Parents 


Aug. 1, 1833 
Feb. 16, 1834 


Jacob Shoe 


Sandy 

(Alexander C.S.A.) 


Parents 


Dec. 8, 1833 
Feb. 16, 1834 


Nelson Sides 


Elizabeth 


Parents 


Sept. 29, 1833 
Feb. 16, 1834 


Mathias Lefler 


Martin Alexander 


Parents 


Oct. 22, 1833 
Feb. 16, 1834 


Frederick Barger 

(Boger?) 
(M. Catherine Plyler 


Johu Adam 
July 15, 1831) 


Johu Barger & 
wife 


Dec. 2, 1833 
Feb. 16, 1834 


Daniel S. Boger 


Titta Mehalley 


Parents 


Jan. 19, 1834 
Feb. 16, 1834 


Jacob Boger 


Eve Caroline 


Henry Barger & 
wife 


Nov. 6, 1833 
Feb. 16, 1834 


Geo. Dry 


Martin 


Parents 


Apr. 13, 1834 
July 25, 1834 


Edmond Sell 


Johu Efrom 


Jno. Barger 


Aug. 27, 1833 
July 25, 1834 


Moses Ridenhour 


Daniel Augustus 


Parents 


Feb. 1, 1834 
July 25, 1834 


Aaron Ridinhour 


Mary Caroline 


Parents 


June 12, 1834 
July 25, 1834 


Geo. Misenheimer 


Amelia Adiline 


Parents 


Feb. 5, 1834 
July 25, 1834 


John Troutman 


Anna Catharine 


Parents 


Oct. 15, 1833 
July 25, 1834 


Daniel Sides 


Lidia Caroline 


Parents 



65 



Apr. 11, 1834 
July 25, 1834 


Charles Ritchev 


Green 


Parents 


Apr. 8, 1834 
Oct. 26, 1834 


Daniel ? (Co.) 


Easter C. 


Sarah Sides 


Sept. (22, 1831) 
Sept. 23, 1834 
Dec. 17. 1834 


Johu Melchor 


Elvire 


Parents 


Jan. 1, 1835 (4) George Sc M. Muse 
1834 


Elisabeth So. 


Parents 


Sept. 19, 1834? 
1834 


Nelson Barringer 
(Crissy Melchor 


Daniel Green Lee 
Sept. 23, 1823) 


Parents 


Oct. 18, 1834 
Apr. 13, 1835 


John Udy 


Jacob Wiley 

(C.S.A.) 


Parents 


Jan. 16, 1834(5) 
Apr. 13, 1835 


Johu Peck, Jr. 


Julius 


Parents 


Apr. 4 

Apr. 13, 1835 


Leana Sides 


Margaret Adline 


Mother 


Jan. 20, 1835 


Geo. Barnhart 


Geo. Franklin 


Parents 


June 








May 13, 1835 
July 24 


Jacob Lyerle 


Marian Amelia 
Elmira 


Parents 


Aug. 11, 1835 
Sept. 26 


Mathew Baringer 


Mars' Ann 

(m. Clayton Misenh( 


Parents 
simer) 


June 21, 1835 
Nov. 15 


Mathias Sides 


Amelia 


Parents 


Aug. 8, 1835 


Geo. Culp, Jr. 


Lovnia 


Parents 


Oct. 2, 1835 


Jacob Shoe 


Sophia 


Parents 



Nov. 16 

Sept. 2, 1835 'Wm. Lowder Sophia Catherine 

Nov. 16 (Sarah Sides m. Nov. 1834) 



Nov. 15, 1835 
Jan. 23, 1836 


Daniel Sides, Jr. 


Easter Adline & Parents 
Alezabeth Catharine 






(twins) 




Nov. 15, 1835 
Feb. 24, 1836 


Solomon Ridenhower 


Lawson Kirkpatrick 


Parents 


Dec. 20, 1835 
Feb. 24, 1836 


Nelson Sides 


Henry William 


Parents 


Dec. 24, 1835 
Feb. 24, 1836 


Henry Plilar 


Moses 


Parents 


June 10, 1835 
March 26, 1836 


Mathias Dr\ 


Green Harvey 


Parents 


Sept. 18, 1835 
March 27, 1836 


Daniel Karriker 


Polly 


Parents 


Nov. 18, 1836 (5) J. N. (M) Lefler 
Apr. 20, 1836 


Daniel Aauston 


Dan Sides 


May 28, 1836 
July 17, 1836 


Daniel Fisher 
(Leah Dry) 


Julius Alexander 


Parents 


Oct. 3, 1835 
July 17, 1836 


Jno. C. Earnhardt 


Johu Crofford 


Parents 



66 



May 24, 1836 
July 23, 1836 

Feb. 6, 1836 
July 23, 1836 

Dec. 22, 1835 
July 23, 1836 

Sept. 2, 1835 
July 23, 1836 

May 15, 1836 
Aug. 28, 

Dec. 18, 1835 
Aug. 28, 1836 

July 28, 1836 
Aug. 28, 1836 

Aug. 5, 1836 
Sept. 15 

July 9, 1836 
Sept. 24, 1836 

Sept. 6, 1834 
Oct. 22, 1836 

April 20, 1836 
Oct. 22, 1836 

Sept. 19, 1835 
Nov. 27, 1836 

Jan. , 1837 

March 26, 1837 

Apr. 13, 1837 
Apr. 22, 1837 

March 8, 1837 
May 20. 1837 

Dec. 19, 1836 
May 27, 1837 

Jan. 2, 1837 

June 23, 1837 
Sept. 17, 1837 

July 30, 1837 
Sept. 17, 1837 

July 6, 1837 
Oct. 15, 1837 

May 23, 1837 
Oct. 15, 1837 

March 21, 1837 
Oct. 15, 1837 

Jan. 19 (11) 1837 
Oct. 15, 1837 

Aug. 8, 1837 
Feb. 25, 1838 

Sept. 11, 1837 
Feb. 25, 1838 



Necklins Ludwick 



Elesabeth 

Crcsa Alezabcth 



Peter Peck 

(Caroline Heiglig) 

Nelsen Barringer Alfred Liuley 



Johu Troutman 
Daniel Boger 
Edmund Sell 



Margret Burneese 
Julius Columbus 
Easter Maria 



Mathias Barger Ruphes Alexander 

(Margaret Mitchell Apr. 20, 1829 (C.S.A.) 

Philip Ridenhouer Davidson Edward 
(Elizabeth Harkey May 12, 1831) 

George Dry Geo. Alexander 

Charles Frick 
Charles Richey 
Rachel Miller 
Johu Melchor 



Sandy 

Jacob 

Margaret Elmira 

Sophia Christeana 



Moses Sides Christopher 

(Polly Blackwelder May 21, 1836) 

Christopher Sides Christopher 



James Udy 
(Sophia) 

David Pery 



Dawalt Harkey 
(Theobald) 

Allen Blackwelder 
Wm. Lowder, Jr. 
Johu Peck, Jr. 
George Barnhart 
Isaac Wagoner 
Jno. Troutman 
Nelson Barringer 



Purity Maria 
Mary Elaline 



Mother 

Parents 

Parents 

Parents 

Parents 

Parents 

Parents 

Parents 

Parents 

Parents 

Parents 

Mother 

Parents 

Christopher Sides 

Elizabeth Moose 

Parents 

Parents 



Christeaua Elizabeth Parents 

Daniel Elbert Parents 

Esther Elesabeth Grand-Parents 

May Jane Parents 

Alfred Bidwell Parents 

Mary Ann Alesabeth Mother 

Mary Levinia Parents 

Anna Margaret Parents 



67 



Sept. 8, 1837 Daniel Fisher 

March 25, 1838 

Jan. 3, 1838 George Moose 

June 17, 1838 

March 27, 1838 George Gulp 
Aug. 20, 1838 

Aug. 14, 1838 Moses Sides 
Oct. 13, 1838 

Nov. 6, 1838 Jacob Lverle 

Jan. 13, 1839 

Dec. 29, 1838 Christopher Sides 
Feb. 2, 1839 

Nov. 15, 1837 Daniel Moose 

Apr. 14, 1839 

March 15, 1839 Mathias Sides 
Aug. 11, 1839 

May 2, 1839 George Dry- 

May 24, 1839 Wm. Lowder, Jr. 

Oct. 19, 1839 Gleaborn Lverle 
Jan. 26, 1840 

June 8, 1839 Mathias Moose 

Oct. 21, 1839 David Lverle 
(Jane Leffler) 

Sept. 13, 1839 Jacob Shoe 
March 15, 1840 

March 24, 1840 Mathias Moose 

Aug. 9, 1840 (Mary File? 1-7-1835) 

May 15, 1840 Solomon Richey 

Oct. 10, 1840 

Aug. 20, 1839 Geo. Earnhardt 

Aug. 9, 1840 Moses Sides 

Oct. 11, 1840 

Dec. 26, 1839 Lydia Honeycutt 
Nov. 15, 1840 

Jan. 15, 1841 Peter Stiers 

March 4, 1841 (Leah Earnhardt) 

June 27, 1840 John Shoe 
March 21, 1841 

Oct. 28, 1840 Nancy ^Velcher 

March 21, 1841 

Apr. 29, (1841) Jacob Barger 
July 18, 1841 

Apr. 30, 1841 Mathias Sides 

July 18, 1841 

June 24, 1841 Mathias Moose 
Sept. 18, 1841 



Paul Jenkins Parents 

John Fritchey Parents 

Polly Clementine Parents 

Easter Parents 

Jacob Parents 

Simon Carnelions Parents 

.\milia Catharine Parents 

Edmond Parents 

Easter Catherine Parents 

Amilia Malincla Parents 

Jacob Crafford Parents 

Alexander Franklin Parents 

Marv Londa Parents 
(Moody) 

Wiley Parents 
(C.S.A.) 

Marv Jane Parents 

Reachel Louisa Parents 

James Edney Harrison Parents 

George 'W'ilson Parents 

Margaret Alisabeth Parents 

Leah Earnhart Jno. Barnhart & 
(m. Israel A. Fisher) wife 

Amelia Catherine Parents 

Johu Wiley Parents 

Crissa Adeline Parents 

Tilmon Parents 

Rachel Serena Parents 



68 



Aug. 23, 1841 
Sept. 18. 1841 


Tobias Plyler 


Daniel Westley 


Parents 


Jan. 2, 1841 
Sept. 18, 1841 


Mathias Moose, Cpt. 


Wm. Harrison 


Parents 


June 16, 1841 
Oct. 23, 1841 


Geo. Dry 


Sara Ann Elisabeth 


Parents 


.Sept. 17, 1841 
Oct. 23, 1841 


Daniel Wagner 


Moses Green 


Parents 


Sept. 21, 1841 
March 20, 1842 


Christopher Sides 


Esther Catherine 


Parents 


Oct. 27, 1841 
March 20, 1842 


William Louder 


George 


Parents 


Dec, 1837 
Oct. 23, 1841 


Isaac Wagner 


Amelia 


Parents 


Oct. 17, 1839 
Oct. 23, 1841 


Isaac Wagner 


Matilda 
(Clotilda?) 


Parents 


Sept. 10, 1841 
Oct. 23, 1841 


Isaac Wagner 


John 


Parents 


Nov. 14, 1841 
Apr. 16, 1842 


David Lierly 


Lydia Alvira 


Parents 


March 12, 1842 
June 4, 1842 


Moses Sides 


Alexander 


Parents 


June 21, 1841 
June 4, 1842 


David Gulp 


Mary Elizabeth 


Parents 


Jan. 3, 1842 
June 4, 1842 


Jacob Shoe 


Amelia Catherine 


Parents 


Jan. 11, 1842 
July 16, 1842 


George Barnhart 


Marshall Lank 


Parents 


July 27, 1842 
Nov. 20, 1842 


George M. Barnhart 


Caleb Theophilus 


Parents 


Nov. 19, 1842 
June 19, 1843 


Matthias Moose 


Daniel Webster 


Parents 


Aug. 7, 1842 
June 19, 1843 


John Shue 


Christena 


Parents 


Sept. 21, 1843 
Nov. 18, 1843 


Edmund Sell 


Charles Augustus 


Parents 


Apr. 11, 1843 
Nov. 10, 1843 


Tobias Plyler 


Henry Davis 


Parents 


June 21, 1843 
Nov. 19, 1843 


Moses Sides 


Johu Lants 


Parents 


March 24, 1843 
Nov. 19, 1843 


Wm. Lowder 


Daniel Rily 


Parents 


Oct. 23, 1842 
Dec. 16, 1843 


Daniel Sides 


Archey Alexander 


Parents 


Oct. 1, 1843 
March 18, 1844 


Wiley Blackwelder 


July Anne 


Parents 


May 23, 1843 
July 21, 1844 


Mary Ann Fry 


Wm. Wesley 


Parents 


May 22, 1844 
Aug. 3, 1844 


George Dry 


Eve Caroline 


Parents 



69 



Dec. 3, 1844 
Jan. 12, 1845 


Jacob Shoe 


Mary 


Parents 


Oct. 30, 1844 
Jan. 12, 1845 


Jacob Barrier 


Johu (A.) 
(C.S.A.) 


Parents 


May 31, 1844 
Jan. 12, 1845 


Christopher Sides, Jr. 


Christena Julia 
Anne 


Parents 


Jan. 6, 1845 
.May 11, 1845 


George Barnhart 


Martha Ann 
Josephine 


Parents 


Apr. 20. 1845 
July 13, 1845 


Riley Sides 


Wiley Martin 


Parents 


Nov. 20, 1845 
March 27, 1846 


Daniel Fisher 


Charles Theophilus 


Parents 


Apr. 

Apr. 5, 1845 


Moses M. Sides 


Daniel Xufes 


Parents 


Aug. 

Aug. 17, 1845 




Levi 


Parents 


Jan. 11, 1846 
Apr. 26, 1846 


Johu Moose 


Johu Hugh 


Parents 


Feb. 26, 1846 
June 12, 1847 


Xathon Drv 


David Alexander 


Parents 


March 23. 1846 
May 24, 1846 


George Moose 


Catherine Amenda 


Parents 


Sept. 21. 1846 
July 11, 1847 


Riley Sides 


Mary 


Parents 


Xov. 5, 1846 

p 


David &: Jane Lyerly 


Joisa Canniva 


Parents 


May 10, 1847 
Sept. 26, 1847 


Jacob Shoe 


Julius Elexander 


Parents 


Aug. 3, 1847 
May 28, 1848 


Thomas Biles 


johu Crawford 


Parents 


Julv 8, 1846 
Sept. 12, 1847 


Mathias Moose 


Amanda 


P'arents 


May 22, 1847 
March 11, 1849 


Charles Barrier 


Geo. Washington 


Parents 


Dec. 20, 1844 
March 11, 1849 


Charles Barrier 


Lovnia 


Parents 


Apr. 4, 1849 
May 26, 1849 


Mathias Barrier 


Henn Da\ison 


Parents 


Apr. 26, 1849 
May 23, 1849 


Riley Sides 


Catherine 


Parents 


May 11, 1848 
Sept. 9, 1849 


Mathias Moose 


Martha Elizabeth 


Parents 


July 20, 1846 
Sept. 9, 1849 


Mathias Moose 


Daniel Monroe 


Parents 


Aug. 26, 1849 
Dec. 30, 1849 


Johu Moose 


Xanq/ Margaret 


Parents 


July 15, 1850 
Aug. 11, 1850 


Alexander Barrier 


Easter Pollv 


Parents 


Apr. 30, 1850 
May 10, 1851 


Jacob Barrier 


Henr)' 


Parents 



70 



March 12, 1850 
May 10, 1851 


C. Martin Shue 


Caroline 


Parents 


Nov. 5, 18,50 
May 10, 1851 


Mats. Barrier 


Johu Wesley 


Parents 


Jan. 11, 1851 
May 11, 1851 


Geo. Barrier Mary Rebekah 
(Mary A. Dry 3-11-1850) 


Parents 


March 1, 1852 
July 3, 1852 


G. M. Barnhart 


Johu Lawsen Heilig 


Parents 


Apr. 25, 1852 
Aug. 1852 


Alexander Barger 


Mely Adline 


Parents 


Dec. 20, 1851 
Aug. 1852 


M. Barger 


Juliana 


Wife 


Feb. 13. 1852 
Aug. 1852 


Jacob C. Barnhart 


Alice Elisabeth 
(m. H. B. Parks) 


Parents 


Sept. 17, 1852 
Apr. 9, 1853 


Mathias A. Barrier 


Daniel Monroe 


Parents 


Apr. 19, 1853 
Feb. 11, 1854 


Jacob Barrier 


Jacob 


Parents 


Jan. 16, 1852 
March 12, 1854 


John Sides 


Sary Adlinee 


Parents 


Feb. 7, 1853 
Apr. 8, 1854 


George Moose 


Johu Wesley 


Parents 


July 17, 1853 
June 25, 1854 


Jacob C. Barnhart 


Martha Jane 


Parents 


July 26, 1854 
Oct. 7, 1854 


Daniel M. Moose 
(Sophia Dry? 9-22 


Charles Thornton 
-1853) 


Parents 


May 14, 1854 


Mathias Barringer 
(&: Elizabeth) 


Johu 


Parents 






Jan. 9, 1855 
March 10, 1855 


Caleb A. Moose 


Augustus Poendexter 


Parents 


Nov. 25, 1853 
Apr. 8, 1855 


Alexander Barrier 


Elisabeth Sally 


Parents 


Dec. 25, 1854 
May 12, 1855 


Alexander Shoe 


Adam Lafayette 


Parents 


Aug. 16, 1854 
May 12, 1855 


Geo. H. Barrier 


Sarah Ann Ledenia 


Parents 


March 15, 1855 
Aug. 12, 1855 


Henry Shoe, Jr. 


Emily 


Parents 


March 2, 1855 
Oct. 14, 1855 


Jac. C. Barnhardt 


Johu Addison Monroe Parents 


Nov. 14, 1855 
March 9, 1856 


Daniel M. Moose 


Luther Hezaelous 


Parents 


June 15, 1855 
June 8, 1856 


George Moose 


James Lewis 


Parents 


March 14, 1856 
Aug. 10, 1856 


Mathias Baninger 


Wiley Monroe 


Parents 


May 29, 1856 
Aug. 10, 1856 


Mathias A. Barger 


Wm. Columbus 
(Mary Ann Matilda) 


Parents 


March 6, 1856 
Sept. 14, 1836 


Geo. H. Barrier 


Margaret Alice 


Parents 



n 



Oct. 27, 1855 
Sept. 14, 1856 

Oct. 28, 1856 
Feb. 8, 1857 

Sept. 3. 1855 
Apr. 11, 1857 

Dec. 11, 1856 
May 10, 1857 

Sept. 30, 1856 
June 14, 1857 

Oct. 13, 1856 
Sept. 12, 1857 

June 25, ? 

Jan. 3, 1852 

Sept. 11, 1856 
Sept. 14, 1857 

Sept. 15, 1857 
Dec. 13, 1857 

June 6, 1857 
Dec. 13, 1857 

Nov. 20, 1856 
Dec. 13, 1857 

Apr. 3, 1857 
Dec. 13, 1857 

Apr. 1858 

Aug. 8, 1858 

Sept. 15, 1857 
Oct. 10, 1858 

Aug. 1, 1858 
Nov. 27, 1858 

July 28, 1858 
May 29, 1859 

March 20, 1859 
June 12, 1859 

Jan. 21, 1859 
Aug. 14, 1859 

Apr. 19, 1860 
July 8, 1860 

July 31, 1859 
July 8, 1860 

Sept. 30, 1859 
Jan. 13, 1861 

Oct. 28, 1860 
May 11, 1861 

Dec. 12, 1860 
Sept. 19, 1861 

May 18, 1861 
July 13, 1862 

May 11, 1862 
Sept. 28, 1862 



Tobius Plyler 

Monroe Moose 

Martin Shoe 

Henry Shoe, Jr. 

Alexander Barrier 

Jacob C. Earnhardt 

Thomas J. Biles 

Thomas J. Biles 

Caleb Augustus Moose 

Julius Peck 

(son of Johu, Sr.) 

Mathias Moose 

Geo. Moose 

Jacob Shoe 

Martin Shoe 

Daniel Plyler 

Jac. B. Barnhardt 

Geo. H. Barrier 

George Moose 

Caleb A. Moose 

Milie Weaver 

Mathias Barrier 

Nelson Barrier 

Jac. C. Bamhart 
(by Rev. J. A. Linn) 

Geo. Mavse 
Matthais Barringer 



Mary Louisa 
Mary Ellen 
Elizabeth 
Levi 
Caleb 



Mary Louisa 
(Molly) (m.Coclrran) 

Margaret Ann 
Elizabeth 



Parents 
Parents 
Parents 
Parents 
Parents 
Parents 
Parents 

Mary Jane Barnhardt Parents 

Albert Theopholus 

James Luther 

Laura Ann 

Archibald "Walter 

Levi Deberry 

Julius Alexander 

Daniel Richel 
Brantly 

Laura Josephine 

Rachel Janette 

Howard Littleton 

Margaret Elizabeth 

Wm. Allison 

Jacob Lafayette 

Wm. Butler Parents 

Geo. Christopher 



Mary Lieu Hannah Parents 
Ann 



Millie Matilda 
Catherine 



Parents 



72 



Nov. 1, 1862 
March 8, 1863 


Caleb A. Moose 


Johu Philip 


Parents 


March 24, 1861 
May 10, 1863 


Matthais Moose 


Lucy Ellen 


Parents 


Feb. 18, 1863 
Sept. 26, 1863 


Henry Shoe 


Henry Davis 


Jno. Shoe 


Sept. 6, 1863 
Sept. 25, 1863 


Jesse Davis (child) 


Alex Shoe (Parent) 


Parents 


Oct. , 1861 

Sept. 26, 1863 


Matthais A. Barriner 


Geo. Beauregard 


Parents 


Sept. 20, 1862 
Sept. 26, 1863 


Alexander Barrier 


Julia Ann Catherine 


Parents 


May , 1863 

July 10, 1864 


George Darson 
(child) 


George Moose 
(Parent) 


Parents 


July 17, 1864 
Nov. 27, 1864 


D. M. Moose 


Albert Lesley 


Parents 


July 1, 1864 
Dec. 25, 1864 


J. H. Underwood 


James Wilson 


Mother 


May 15, 1866 
July 28, 1866 


J. H. Underwood 


Joanna 




May 15, 1866 
July 29, 1866 


Edmond Ritchey 


Mary Ann Elizabeth 
Cornelia 




Sept. 20, 1868 
Jan. 24, 1869 


C. A. Moose 


Joseph Eugene 




Oct. 28, 1868 
March 28, 1869 


D. M. Moose 


James Edy 




Oct. 17, 1866 
June 27, 1869 


George Moose 


Martha Jane 




Dec. 7, 1868 
June 27, 1869 


George Moose 


Alice Elizabeth 




Apr. 4, 1869 
Dec. 26, 1869 


John H. Moose 

(Susan Artz 3-16- 


AUice Henrietta 
•1866) 




May 31, 1870 
Oct. 23, 1870 


J. L. Peck 


Calvin Emmanuel 




Apr. 21, 1870 
Oct. 23, 1870 


Alfred B. Barnhart 


Geo. Henry 




Sept. 9, 1870 
Jan. 22, 1871 


J. F. Moose 

(Mary E. Walker 


Martha Lula 
5-22-1865?) 




June 30, 1871 
Sept. 23, 1871 


C. A. Moose 


Chas. A. 




Apr. 7, 1871 
Sept. 23, 1871 


J. H. Moose 


Wm. Baxter 




May 26, 1871 
Sept. 23, 1871 


George Moose 


Wm. Juan 




Aug. 3, 1871 
Oct. 22, 1871 


Alexander Shoe 


Fanny Rebeca 




Nov. 28, 1871 
Dec. 8, 1872 


C. T. Fisher 


Louisa Brum? 




Aug. 25, 1872 
Nov. 26, 1872 


D. M. Moose 


Rachel Jenny Rose 


' : '■ 



73 



Mav 21, 
Nov. 26, 

Aug. 25, 
Apr. 26, 

Aug. 28, 
Apr. 26, 

Dec. 8, 
Apr. 26, 

June 12, 
Sept. 1, 

Jan. 12. 
Sept. 1, 

Aug. 4, 
Apr. 26, 

Jan. 31, 
May 24, 

Oct. 19, 

Sept. 13 

Oct. 6, 
Feb. 14, 

June 15, 
May 23, 

Apr. 29, 
July 11, 

Oct. 18, 
March 1 

Nov. 16, 
Apr. 22, 

Aug. 24, 



1872 
1872 

1872 
1873 

1872 
1873 

1872 
1873 

1873 
1873 

1873 
1873 

1873 
1874 

1874 
1874 

1873 
, 1874 

1874 
1875 

18'-i5 
1875 



G. H. PIvler Ciarkson Jenilusr 

J. C. Ridenhour Henry Clay 

Johu Barrier Catherine Elisabeth 

Johu F. Moose Mar\ Anna 



Paul A. Earnhardt Margaret Minny 
Elisabeth 



J. L. Peck 
J. H. Moose 



Kirby Floke 
Jason Fiugh 



J. E. H. Earnhardt James Flenderson 
(m. Julia Blackwelder) 

Daniel Hegler Ida Franses 



1875 
2, 1876 

1875 
1876 



March 11, 1877 
Apr. 21, 1877 

Apr. 1, 1876 
July 8, 1877 

Aug. 17, 1861 



Dec. 29, 1875 
Jan. 27, 1878 

Sept. 8, 1877 
Apr. 27, 1878 

Oct. 17, 1877 
Apr. 27, 1878 

March 18, 1858 
Apr. 28, 1878 

Oct. 28, 1861 
Apr. 28, 1878 

Jan. 13, 1878 
July 21, 1878 

Sept. 5, 1878 
Dec. 8, 1878 



Alexander Shoe 

Mathias Sides 

Johu F. Moose 

Johu Fi. Moose 

Johu Barrier 

Ephrem Green 

H. D. Barrier 

J. L. Peck 

E. Green 

G. H. Sides 

(Joisa C. Lyerle) 

Johu F. Moose 
Johu Fi. Moose 
.\lex. Palmer 
Alex Palmer 
Joicy E. Fisher 
Daniel J. Fisher 



Charles Monroe 

Matilda Adline 

George Flenry 

Son Johu B. Gilbert 

Son Caleb Monroe 

Son Charlie 
Blackman 

Charles Alexander 

Lewis Edward 

Marv Ellen 

Charlie 'Washington 

Johu Wade 

Sarah Catherine 

D. 'W. Palmer 

L. M. Palmer 

Adalee 

Charles Flurbert 



Parents 
Parents 
Parents 
Parents 
Parents 
Parents 
Parenis 
Parents 
Parents 
Parents 
Parents 



Parenti 
Parents 
Parents 
Parents 
Parents 
Parents 
Parents 
Parents 



74 



Apr. 9, 1878 
July 21, 1879 


J. A. Peck 


Cara Agnas 
(Cornice) 




Sept. 12, 1878 
Apr. 13, 1879 


Moses Hurlechor 


Johu Crooks 




Dec. 4, 1875 
June 11, 1876 


J. A. Fisher 


Calvin DeBerry 


Parents 


Apr. 15, 1879 
July 13, 1879 


D. H. Blackwelder 


Ora Ida Lee 


Parents 


March 8, 1879 
Sept. 14, 1879 


C. T. Fisher 


Agga Grace 


Parents 


Jan. 9, 1879 
Sept. 14, 1879 


Wm. Barringer 


Margaret Elisabeth 


Parents 


Jan. 13, 1879 
Sept. 14, 1879 


Wm. A. Lyerle 


Wm. Bruner 


Parents 


Aug. 2, 1879 
Feb. 8, 1880 


J. L. Peck 


Hattie Cornelia 




March 31, 1879 
July 12, 1879 


Luther H. Moose 


Jacob Otho 


Parents 


Sept. 3, 1879 
Feb. 29, 1880 


Jno. H. Moose 


Frances Marie 




Oct. 22, 1879 
June 13, 1880 


H. D. Barrier 


Elisia Joan 




Sept. 7, 1879 
June 27, 1880 


Joel Honeycutte 


Lonie Beatrice 




Feb. 19, 1880 
Aug. 22, 1880 


Johu F. Moose 


James Adolphus 




May 15, 1880 
Aug. 14, 1881 


Henry Barrier 


Paul Alexander 




Sept. 10, 1881 
Feb. 12, 1882 


Johu H. Moose 


Ellen Julia 




March 11, 1867 
Feb. 12, 1882 


Moses Hurlocker 


Sarah Jane 


Parents 


Aug. 19, 1868 


Moses Hurlocker 


Leah Isabel 


Parents 


Oct. 25, 1870 


Moses Hurlocker 


Francis C. 


Parents 


Dec. 8, 1873 


Moses Hurlocker 


Margaret Juliann 


Parents 


Mar. 25, 1878(6?) 


Moses Hurlocker 


Emma 


Parents 


March 12, 1881 
March 19, 1882 


Eve Holacher 
(Wife of Moses) 


Minnie Mariah 


Parents 


June 13, 1881 
Apr. 23, 1882 


Wm. A(usborne) 
Lyrlie 


Daisy Ellen 


Parents 


Feb. 1, 1882 
June 11. 1882 


Julius A. Fisher 
(& wife C. E.) 


Geo. Columbus Wade 


: Parents 


Jan. 12, 1882 
June 11, 1882 


D. H. Blackwelder 


Lizzie May 


Parents 


Aprl. 27, 1882 
July 20, 1882 




D. W. M. LitUes 




Aug. 25, 1882 
Jan. 28, 1883 


J. L. Peck 


Jennie Rose 


Parents 


Sept. 16, 1882 
Jan. 28, 1883 


L. H. Moose 


Annie Elizabeth 


Parents 



75 



May 6, 1882 
Feb. 25, 1883 

Dec. 17, 1881 
Feb. 25, 1883 

March 25, 1882 
Feb. 25, 1883 

Jan. 14, 1883 
June 10, 1883 

Sept. 20, 1882 
June 10, 1883 

June 20, 1883 
Aug. 26, 1883 

Sept. 2, 1882 
Aug. 26, 1883 



J. A. Peck 



Georg Julius 



W. G. H. Barringer Mauda Alice 
m. M. C. Lentz Jan. 26, 1869) 



C. T. Fisher 



Wiley Shoe 



Josey Emma 
Minnie Jennie Linn 



Parents 



Parents 



Parents 



^Vm. C. Barrier Mattie Joan 

(Sarah Elizabeth Sides) 

J. H. Moose Boyd Artz 



Henry Barrier 



Martha Ellen 



76 



RECORD OF BIRTHS AND BAPTISMS 



Bethel Lutheran Church 



BmXH & 
BAPTISM 

Sept. 8, 1837 
March 25, 1838 

Feb. 25, 1836 
March 25, 1838 

Dec. 31, 1837 
Apr. 25, 1838 

Sept. 23, 1837 
March 25, 1838 

Jan. 17, 1838 
Apr. 21, 1838 

Jan. 31, 1838 
June 17, 1838 

Apr. 2, 1838 
June 17, 1838 

Feb. 3, 1838 
June 17, 1838 

Feb. 18, 1838 
Aug. 12, 1838 

Nov. 3, 1838 
Jan. 21, 1839 

July 29, 1838 
March 22, 1839 

Nov. 28, 1838 
March 22, 1839 

Feb. 12, 1839 
March 22, 1839 

March 29, 1839 
May 19, 1839 

May 29, 1839 
Aug. 27, 1839 

Aug. 30, 1839 
Oct. 25, 1839 

May 16, 1840 
July 5, 1840 

Jan. 30, 1840 
July 5, 1840 

Feb. 1, 1840 
Sept. 12, 1840 

Oct. 7, 1840 
Jan. 10. 1841 

Jan. 3, 1841 
May 2, 1841 

Aug. 30, 1840 
May 2, 1841 



CHILDREN 

Paul Jenkins 

Robert Franklin 
Matilda Emeline 
Cowsa Elmira 
Daniel Cariker 
John Frilchey 
Martin Alexander 
Amelia Elmira 
Daniel Martin 
Julia Autilda 
Ivy 

John Welsey 
Charles Theophilus 
Lundy 

Mary Elizabeth 
Victor Theophilus 
Sarah 
Elizabeth 

Barbara Catherine 
Henry Harrison 
William Wilson 
Sarah Alvina 



PARENTS 



SPONSORS 



Daniel Sc Leah 
Fisher 



Parents 
Parents 
Parents 
Parents 
Parents 
Parents 
Edmund &: Eve Sell Parents 



Nicholas & Lydia 
Lefler 

Solomon & E. 
Ridenhour 

Claiborne & 

Elizabeth Leyerle 

Daniel & Sophia 
Kariker 

George & Maria 
Moose 



Solomon & Mary Ann Parents 
Ritchey 

Daniel & Esther Parents 

Sides 

Matthew & Rebecca Parents 
Barringer 

Charles & Margaret Parents 
Ritchey 

Daniel S. & Lydia Parents 
Boger 

Philip &: Elizabeth Parents 
Ridenhour 

Nelson & Christena Parents 
Barringer 

Allen M. & Martha Parents 
Blackvvelder 

Johu & Sophia Parents 

Melchor 

Parents 
Parents 

Edmund & Eve Sell Parents 
Parents 



Daniel & Sophia 
Kariker 

Johu & Sarah 
Troutman 



Nelsen & Christena 
Barringer 

Daniel S. & Lydia Parents 
Boger 

Daniel & Esther Parents 

Sides 



77 



Apr. 5, 1840 
May 29, 1841 

March 18, 1841 
May 29, 1841 

March 21, 1841 
July 17, 1841 

March 5, 1841 
Aug. 31, 1841 

Aug. 6, 1841 
Oct. 15, 1841 

Aug. 30, 1841 
Oct. 30, 1841 

Sept. 3, 1841 
Dec. 4, 1841 

Dec. 3, 1841 
March 19, 1842 

March 27, 1842 
May 28, 1842 

Dec. 31, 1841 
May 28, 1842 

June 18, 1842 
May 28, 1842 

Apr. 13, 1842 
July 30, 1842 

May 14, 1842 
Aug. 6, 1842 

Feb. 12, 1842 
Oct. 1, 1842 



Oct. 8, 
Jan. 14, 

Nov. 11, 
Apr. 15, 

Nov. 24, 
June 3, 

Jan. 17, 
June 3, 

Apr. 3, 
June 17 

Jan. 3, 
July 23, 

May 17, 
July 23, 

Nov. 30, 
May 18, 

Aug. 22, 
May 18, 

Apr. 4, 
May 18, 

Feb. 20, 
July 20, 



1842 
1843 

1842 
1843 

1842 
1843 

1843 
1843 

1843 
, 1843 

1843 
1843 

1843 
1843 

1843 
1844 

1843 
1844 

1844 
1844 

1844 
1844 



Lundy 

Leah Margaret 

Johu Wiley 

Mary Caroline 

Margaret Lodenia 

Clara Sophia 
Catherine 

Martha Adaline 
Sarah Caroline 
Johu Tyler 
William Harter 
Johu Cyrus 
Jacob Wilson 
Green Alexander 
Henry Daniel 
Hartives Davis 
Laura Elizabeth 
Aaron Wiley 
Clara Elizabeth 
Clara Ann Elizabeth 
Margaret Jane 
Margaret Elmira 
^Villiam Gibson 
William Harter 
Mary Ann Elizabeth 
Maria Julia Ann 



Johu & Leah Peck Parents 

Moses & Sophia Parents 

Shimpoch 

Allen M. & Martha Parents 
Blackwelder 

Edmund W. S: Parents 

Elizabeth Blackwelder 

Matthew & Reljecca Parents 
Barringer 

Philip Sc Elizabeth Parents 
Ridenhour 

Johu Sc Sophia Parents 

Melchor 

Solomon & Mar)' Parents 
Ann Ritchey 

Claiborne Sc Elizabeth Parents 
Leyerle 

Johu & Sarah Parents 

Troutman 

Edmund W. & Eliz Parents 
Blackwelder 

Daniel & Sophia Parents 

Kariker 

Isom & Mary L. Parents 

Misenheimer 

Daniel & Elizabeth Parents 
Moose 

Caswell & Lydia Parents 

Sides 

Nelson Sc Christena Parents 
Barringer 

Solomon 8: Elizabeth Parents 
Ridenhour 

Wiley & Esther Parents 

Leyerle 

Daniel & Lydia Parents 

Boger 

Charles & Margaret Parents 
Ritchey 

Allen M. & Martha Parents 
Blackwelder 

Johu & Sophia Parents 

Melchor 

Moses & Sophia Parents 

Shimpoch 

Philip & Elizabeth Parents 
Ridenhour 

David & Jane Parents 

Leyerle 



78 



July 19, 1844 
Oct. 19, 1844 


George Monroe 


Isom & Mary L. 
Misenheimer 


Parents 


May 21, 1844 
Nov. 30, 1844 


Jacob Hartwell 


Wiley & Esther 
Leyerle 


Parents 


Sept. 7, 1844 
March 15, 1845 


Mary Ann Elizabeth 


Clairborne & 

Elizabeth Leyerle 


Parents 


Nov. 27, 1844 
March 29, 1845 


John Darlen 


Caswell & Lydia 
Sides 


Parents 


Jan. 14, 1845 
March 29, 1845 


Elizabeth Lodema 


Tobias &: Mary L. 
Plyler 


Parents 


Aug. 2, 1844 
Apr. 18, 1845 


Peter Elijah 


David O. & Martha 
Lentz 


Parents 


Nov. 26, 1844 
Apr. 18, 1845 


Wm. George Harter 


Nelson & Christena 
Barringer 


Parents 


Feb. 18, 1845 
Apr. 18, 1845 


John J. Davidson 


Matthew Sc Rebecca 
Barringer 


Parents 


June 26, 1845 
Aug. 16, 1845 


Edmund Archibald 


Dan'l. & Rachel 
Plyler 


Parents 


July 19, 1844 
Feb. 11, 1845 


Frances Regina 


Caleb & Lydia 
Lefler 


Parents 


June 11, 1845 
July 20, 1845 


Elizabeth Louisa 


Solomon &: Elizabeth 
Ridenhour 


Parents 


May 3, 1843 
July 19, 1845 


John Jeremiah 


Solomon Sc Elizabeth 
Sell 


Parents 


June 14, 1845 
Sept. 20, 1845 


Margaret Salina 


Daniel & Esther 
Sides 


Parents 


Oct. 7, 1844 
Jan. 3, 1846 


Frances Sophia 


Matthias & Elizabeth 
Moose 


Parents 


June 6, 1845 
Jan. 17, 1846 


Martha Josephine 


Edmund Sc Elizabeth 
Blackwelder 


Parents 


Oct. 22, 1845 
March 14, 1846 


Green DeBerry 


Daniel S. & Lydia 
Boger 


Parents 


Sept. 2, 1845 
May 24, 1846 


Amanda Louisa 


John & Sarah 
Troutman 


Parents 


Dec. 2, 1845 
May 24, 1846 


Martha Clementine 


Allen M. & Martha 
Blackwelder 


Parents 


Feb. 6, 1845 
June 6, 1846 


Albert Croford 


David D. & Martha 
Lentz 


Parents 


Apr. 11, 1846 
Aug. 2, 1846 


Wm. Erastus 


Isom &: Mary L. 
Misenheimer 


Parents 


Apr. 21, 1846 
Sept. 19, 1846 


Daniel Alexander 


Wiley & Esther 
Leyerle 


Parents 


Aug. 22, 1846 
Nov. 14, 1846 


Daniel Harter 


Philip & Elizabeth 
Ridenhour 


Parents 


July 25, 1846 
March 6, 1847 


Mary Catherine 


Charles & Sophia 
Sides 


Parents 


July 28, 1846 
Apr. 3, 1847 


Eliza Rozana 


Nelson & Christena 
Barringer 


Parents 


Nov. 7, 1846 
May 29, 1847 


William Steadman 


Edmund & Elizb 
Blackwelder 


Parents 



79 



March 5, 1847 
May 29, 1847 

Sept. 30, 1846 
May 29, 1847 

Nov. 5, 1846 
July 16, 1847 

Dec. 26, 1846 
July 31, 1847 

Feb. 17, 1847 
July 31, 1847 

Nov. 28, 1846 
July 31, 1847 

Feb. 16, 1847 
Aug. 14, 1847 

May 20, 1847 
Aug. 29, 1847 

Nov. 11, 1847 
Apr. 1, 1848 

Dec. 20, 1847 
Apr. 29, 1848 

Dec. 19, 1847 
Apr. 29, 1848 

Nov. 12, 1847 
May 20, 1848 

Jan. 11, 1848 
July 15, 1848 

Feb. 24, 1848 
Sept. 2, 1848 

May 30, 1848 
Sept. 9, 1848 

June 28, 1848 
Nov. 17, 1848 

June 28, 1848 
Dec. 2, 1848 

Sept. 6, 1848 
March 30, 1849 

Sept. 25, 1848 
Sept. 24, 1849 

Feb. 4, 1849 
Oct. 14, 1849 

May 20, 1849 
Nov. 24, 1849 

Feb. 22, 1849 
xNov. 24, 1849 

Apr. 4, 1849 
Nov. 24, 1849 

Apr. 8, 1849 
Dec. 9, 1849 

Sept. 24, 1849 
Dec. 9, 1849 



Lundy Catharine 
Elizabeth 
Joisa Conniva 
Sarah Sophia 
Mary Isabella 
F.klridge Steadman 
George Harter 
Martlia Julia Ann 
Sarah M. Isabella 
Albert DeMarcus 
Adam O. Lebref 
Sarah Ann Sophia 
Daniel Albert 
Amelia 
Adaline 

Davidson Alexander 
Martha Luana 
Daniel Harter 
Amanda Eraeline 
Julias Alexander 
Wesley Alexander 
Caleb Savantus 
Frances Amanda 
^V'esley Harter 
Lydia Miranda 



Johu & Sarah Parents 

Wagner 

Jacob N. & Catherine Parents 
Barrier 

David &: Jane Parents 

Leyerle 

Caswell & Lydia Parents 
Sides 

Daniel & Rachel Parents 

Plyler 

David &: Catharine Parents 
Perry 

Tobias & Polly P. Parents 
Plyler 

Peter & Maria Parents 

Misenheimer 

David D. & Parents 

Martha Lentz 

Isom & Mary L. Parents 
Misenheimer 

Solomon & Elizabeth Parents 
Ridenhour 

Daniel & Leah Parents 

Fisher 

Caleb &: Lydia Parents 

Lefler 

Jacob N. &: Parents 

Catherine Barrier 

Martin & Barbara 
Shoe 

Claiborne &: Parents 

Elizabeth Leyerle 

Wiley &: Exther Parents 

Leyerle 

W'iley &: Elizabeth Parents 
Blackwelder 

Johu &; Sarah Parents 

■\Vagner 

Tobias & Helena ? Parents 



Charles & Sophia Parents 
Sides 

Nelson &: Christena Parents 
Barringer 

David & C. Leyerle Parents 



David & Catharine Parents 
Perry 

Allen M. & Martha Parents 
Blackwelder 



80 



Nov. 4, 1849 
Jan. 26, 1850 


Wm. Cornelius 


Matthew & Elizabeth 
Barringer 


Parents 


Nov. 30, 1849 
Feb. 8, 1850 


Joicy Adaline 


David D. & 
Martha Lentz 


Parents 


Aug. 31, 1849 
Feb. 8, 1850 


Mary Jane 


Caswell & Lydia 
Sides 


Parents 


Jan. 26, 1850 
Apr. 13, 1850 


Johu Luther 


Dan'l. & Elizabeth 
Randleman 


Parents 


Jan. 30, 1850 
Apr. 13, 1850 


Wm. Alexander 


Solomon & Mary Ann 
Ritchey 


Parents 


Nov. 18. 1849 
Apr. 27, 1850 


Martha C. Elizabeth 


Isom & L. 
Misenheimer 


Parents 


Jan. 19, 1850 
July 28, 1850 


Frances Miranda 


Peter & Maria 
Misenheimer 


Parents 


Dec. 26, 1849 
July 28, 1850 


Joicy Elizabeth 


Dan'l. & Leah 
Fisher 


Parents 


May 17, 1830 
Sept. 7, 1850 


Amelia Abilgail 


Solomon k Elizabeth 
Ridenhour 


Parents 


March 15, 1850 
Jan. 11, 1851 


Martha Ellen 


Caleb & Lydia 
Lefler 


Parents 


Apr. 6, 1850 
Jan. 26, 1851 


Margaret L. 


Mathias & Elizabeth 
Moose 


Parents 


Jan. 3, 1851 
May 11, 1851 


Jacob Luther 


Edmund W. & F. 
Blackwelder 


Parents 


Oct. 23, 1850 
May 11, 1851 


William Wesley 


Claibonie &: 

Elizabeth Leyerle 


Parents 


Oct. 21, 1850 

? 


George Esau 


? 


Parents 


? 

? 


Henry Jacob 


Daniel & Rachel 
Plyler 




Aug. 25, 1850 
May 24, 1851 


Pleasant Paul 


Solo. & Elzabeth 
Sell 


Parents 


Apr. 16, 1851 
June 8, 1851 


Herrenita Lodema 


Dan'l. & L. C. 
Melchor 


Parents 


Apr. 7, 1851 
June 21, 1851 


Caleb Alexander 


Philip & 
Elizabeth Ridenhour 


Parents 


Dec. 29, 1850 
Sept. 27, 1851 


Johu Rufus 


Johu & Sarah 
Wagner 


Parents 


July 22, 1851 
Sept. 29, 1851 


Burwell Newton 
Hopkins 


AVesley T. & 
Mary Miller 


Parents 


May 10, 1851 
Nov. 8, 1851 


David Elbert 


David & Catharine 
Perry 


Parents 


July 8, 1851 
Dec. 19, 1851 


Martha Elmira 


David & Jane 
Leyerle 


Parents 


Oct. 6, 1851 
Jan. 11, 1852 


Caiaphas Monroe 


Allen M. & 
Martha Blackwelder 


Parents 


Sept. 17, 1850 
March 28, 1852 


Barbara Julia Ann 


Solomon &: Mary 
Ann Ritchey 


Parents 


Jan. 7, 1852 
May 22, 1852 


Eve Caroline 


Moses & Sophia 
Spimpoch 


Parents 



81 



Feb. 26, 1852 
June 26, 1852 


Ureanah Lily 


Dan'l. M. & 
Elvira Lefler 


Parents 


Feb. 8. 1852 
June 27, 1852 


Josephine Elizabeth 


Peter & Maria 
Misenheimer 


Parents 


Oct. 26, 1851 
June 27, 1852 


Lydia 


Susannah Sides 


Parents 


Apr. 2, 1852 
Aug. 8, 1852 


Albert Pearson 


Dan'l. & E. M. 
Rendleman 


Parents 


Feb. 20, 1852 
Aug. 8, 1852 


Daniel Jacob 


Daniel Sc Leah 
Fisher 


Parents 


Aug. 7, 1852 
Oct. 24, 1852 


Rufus Monroe 


Paul 8: Caroline 
Barringer 


Parents 


Aug. 19, 1852 
Nov. 13, 1852 


Urah Jemima 


E. W. & E. 
Blackwelder 


Parents 


March 27, 1852 
Dec. 17, 1852 


Matthias Davidson 


Nelson &; C. 
Barringer 


Parents 


Nov. 4, 1852 
Jan. 23, 1853 


Frances Martha Ann 


Tobias & L. 
Plyler 


Parents 


Sept. 20, 1852 
March 26, 1853 


Moses 


Edmund & Martha 
Peck 


Parents 


June 26, 1852 
May 21, 1853 


Elizabeth 


Chas. &: Sophia 
Sides 


Parents 


Feb. 25, 1852 
May 22, 1853 


Sarah Elmira 


Matthias & 

Elizabeth Moose 


Parents 


Sept. 18, 1852 
June 26, 1853 


Mary Ann 


Martin & Barbara 
Shoe 


Parents 


June 5, 1853 
Sept. 26, 1853 


Margaret Caroline 


Daniel & Leah C. 
Melchor 


Parents 


Oct. 11, 1851 
Nov. 26, 1853 


Daniel Harris 


Catharine Barringer 


Parents 


Aug. 17, 1852 
June 4, 1854 


James Albert 


Solomon & Mary A. 
Ritchey 


Parents 


Feb. 19, 1854 
June 18, 1854 


Hector Harris 


Allen M. & Martha 
Blackwelder 


Parents 


Julv 21, 1853 
Sept. 3, 1854 


Amelia Mahala Talla 


Claiborne & Eliz. 
Leyerle 


Parents 


Aug. 29, 1853 
Sept. 3, 1854 


Susan Sophia 


David & Catharine 
Perry 


Parents 


July 14, 1854 
Oct. 15, 1854 


George Harris 


Daniel & Eliz M. 
Rendleman 


Parents 


June 24, 1854 
Nov. 19, 1854 


Daniel Webster 


Peter & Maria 
Misenheimer 


Parents 


Feb. 9, 1854 
Dec. 2, 1854 


Amelia Frances Anna 


Edmund & Martha 
Peck 


Parents 


June 6, 1854 
Jan. 7, 1855 


Barbara Jane 


E. W. & E. C. 
Blackwelder 


Parents 


Dec. 16, 1854 
Apr. 8, 1855 


Leah Rebecca 


Paul & Catharine 
Barringer 




March 2, 1854 
Apr. 8. 1855 


Laura Janetta 


David & Jane 
Leyerle 


Parents 



82 



Jan. 30, 1855 
Apr. 22, 1855 

Jan. 9, 1855 
Apr. 22, 1855 

Apr. 6, 1855 
May 26, 1855 

Sept. 6, 1854 
May 26, 1855 

March 14, 1855 
May 26, 1855 

Feb. 27, 1854 
June 24, 1855 

Sept. 23, 1854 
July 22, 1855 

Apr. 9, 1855 
July 22, 1855 

Jan. 18, 1856 
March 22, 1856 

Nov. 1, 1856 
Apr. 13, 1856 

Nov. 13, 1855 
Apr. 27, 1856 

Oct. 26, 1856 
Apr. 27, 1856 

March 30, 1856 
June 29, 1856 

Oct. 18, 1855 
Sept. 7, 1856 

July 30. 1856 
Sept. 19, 1856 

Feb. 10, 1856 
Sept. 21, 1856 

Feb. 10, 1856 
Sept. 21, 1856 

June 18, 1856 
Sept. 23, 1856 

Dec. 25, 1840 
June, 1856 

June 22, 1845 
June, 1856 

Oct. 29, 1856 
Feb. 15, 1857 

Nov. 2, 1856 
Feb. 15, 1857 

Oct. 20, 1856 
Apr. 5, 1857 

Aug. 18, 1856 
Apr. 8, 1857 

March 27, 1856 
May 16. 1857 



George Enoch 
William Columbus 
Lamanda Burnese 
George Washington 
Solomon Luther 
Lydia Emeline 
Sarah Elmira 
Brantley Harris 
Jones Shemei 
John Addison 
Stokes Addison 
Laura Frances 
Eliza Jane 
Nancy Alabama 
Lawson Alexander 
Osborne Gentry 
James Eli 
Simon Parker 
Charles Lefler 
Louise Josephine 
Columbus Thornton 
Wm. Osborne 
Rufus Monroe 
Rachel Rebecca 
Julian Adolphus 



Daniel & Leah Parents 

Fisher 

Chas. & Sophia Sides Parents 

Nelson & Chris. Parents 

Barringer 

Solomon & Mary Parents 

Ann Ritchie 

Adam & Catharine Parents 
Troutman 

Matthew Sc Parents 

Elizabeth Moose 

Caleb & Lydia Parents 

Lefler 

Edmund & Martha Parents 
Peck 

Claiborne & Mary A. Parents 
Misenheimer 

Julius & Elmira Parents 

Peck 

Claiborne & E. Parents 

Leyerle 

Monroe & Mary A. Parents 
Walker 

A. M. & Martha Parents 

Blackwelder 

David & Catharine Parents 
Perry 

Franklin A. Sc Parents 

Esther M. Ridenhour 

Dan'l. M. & Elvira Parents 
Lefler 

Wm. &: Mary J. Parents 
Lefler 

E. W & E. C. Parents 

Blackwelder 

Geo. & Esther Adult 

Lefler 

Geo. S: Esther Parents 

Lefler 

Paul & Catharine Parents 
Barringer 

Christopher & Eliz Parents 
E. Leyerle 

Adam 8: Catharine Parents 
Troutman 

Daniel Sc Leah Parents 

Fisher 

Dav. E. & Elizabeth S. Parents 
Riednhour (born 
Moose) 



83 



March 13, 1857 
Jan. 17, 1858 

Nov. 15, 1857 
March 21, 1858 

March 4, 1858 
June 20, 1858 

March 31. 1858 
June 20, 1858 

Jan. 19, 1858 
Oct. 4, 1858 

June 20, 1858 
Oct. 17, 1858 

July 24, 1858 
Apr. 16, 1859 

June 7, 1858 
Apr. 16, 1859 

Dec. 7, 1858 
Apr. 16, 1859 

Aug. 14, 1859 
Sept. 26, 1859 

Sept. 26, 1857 
Nov. 20, 1859 

June 5, 1859 
Nov. 20, 1859 

Nov. 23, 1858 
Nov. 20, 1859 

Nov. 18, 1866 
July 21, 1867 

Feb. 7, 1866 
Aug. 4, 1867 

March 20, 1859 
May 12, 1860 

Apr. 4, 1859 
May 12, 1860 

Nov. 15, 1859 
June 3, 1860 

Oct. 30, 1858 
June 17, 1860 

Feb. 11, 1860 
July 15, 1860 

May 12, 1860 
Sept. 16, 1860 

May 12, 1860 
Sept. 16, 1860 

Jan. 17, 1860 
Sept. 16, 1860 

May 23, 1860 
Sept. 16, 1860 



Ettie Elmira 
Laura Janetta 
Pearson Rowan 

VVm. Octavius Bunyan 

Johu Anthony 

Laura Roxana 

Florence Alice 
Victoria 

Daniel Luther 
Laura Martha Ann 
Martha Alice 
Reuben Caspers 
Wm. Brantley 

Moses Alexander 

William Fritchey 
Laura Polonia 
Stokey Cicero 
Sarah Ann Rebecca 
Alice Joann 
Alice Ludinda 
Charles Theophilus 
Julius Edney 
Frances Rowena 
Martha Ellen 
Mary Jane 



Peter 8: Maria Parents 

Misenheimer 

Julius C. S: Elizabeth Father 
Ridenhour (Moose) 

Claiborne & Mary A. Parents 
Misenheimer 
(Barringer) 

Julius A. &: Parents 

Christena A. Fisher 

Dan'l. M. & Elvira Parents 
(Melchor) Lefler 

Franklin A. & EstherParents 
(Sell) Ridenhour 

David &: Jane (Lefler) Parents 
Leyerle 

Charles & Sophia Parents 
(Leyerle) Sides 

Christ. & Elizabeth Parents 
(Lefler) Leyerle 

D. E. & E. S. (Moose) Parents 
Ridenhour 

Solo. & Mary A. Parents 
(Fisher) Ritchie 

W. J. fc Anna M. Parents 
(Barringer) 
Barringer 

Adam & Catherine Parents 
Troutman (nee 
Barringer) 

Johu F. Sc Mary C. Parents 
Moose 

Peter J. & Mary A. Parents 
Lentz 

Edmund Peck & W. Parents 
Martha 

Ludemia Barringer Parents 



David House & wife Parents 

Mathias Moose & w. Parents 
Elizabeth 



J. C. Ridenhour & 
wife Elizabeth 

Chas. Sides &: w. 
Sophia 

Chas. Sides & w. 
(twin) Sophia 

Julius Peck & wife 
Elmira 

Wm. A. Moody & 
wife Mary 



Parents 



Twin 



Twin 



84 



Dec. 26, 1860 
Apr. 21, 1861 

Sept. 2, 1860 
May 19, 1861 

Jan. 30, 1861 
May 18, 1861 

Jan. 21, 1861 
May 19, 1861 



Mary Josaphine 
John Anthony 
Alfred Alexander 



Chris. Leyerle &: 
w. El. 

P. J. Fisher & w. 
Margaret 

M. J. Barringer 8: 
w. Lunda 



Adolphus Leantes W. J. Barringer & w. 

Anna M. 
(Anna M. Sides, once Barringer, the mother of Adolphus 
L. Barringer, says this is a mistake in the age of A. L. Barringer. 
She says he was born on Jan. 21— year of surrender— 1865— 
Record here is ) 



Sept. 24, 1860 
Nov. 17, 1861 

Apr. 18, 1860 
Nov. 17, 1861 

Sept. 4, 1861 
Dec. 15, 186] 

Dec. 24, 1860 
Dec. 15, 1861 

March 9, 1861 
Dec. 15, 1861 

Sept. 6, 1861 
March, 1862 

Apr. 29, 1861 
Apr. 3, 1862 

Oct. 10, 1860 
Oct. 20, 1861 

Sept. 4, 1862 
March 15, 1863 

Dec. 13, 1862 
July 18, 1863 

Aug. 6, 1862 
July 18, 1863 

A Young Infant 
July 18, 1863 

March 18, 1863 
July 18, 1863 

Jan. 16, 1863 
July 18. 1863 

Aug. 16, 1862 
Aug. 16, 1863 

July 11, 1858 
Sept. 26, 1863 

July 10, 1859 
Sept. 26, 1863 

March 9, 1863 
Sept. 26, 1863 

Oct. , 1861 

Sept. 26, 1863 



Martha J. R. 
Frances 

Martha Rebecca 
Addy Lou Cornelia 
Johu Luther 
Wra. Montgomery 
Charles Gustavus 
Mary Bell Rebecca 
Flora Agnes 
Julian Elizabeth 
Martha Serena 
Jacob Anthony 
Ellen Janette 
Rose Ann Cornelia 
Martha Ellen 
Lovina Ellen 
James Osborne 
Henry Davis 
George Beauregard 



Chris. Sides &: w. 
Frances E. 

Julius Peck & w. 
Elmira 

Clavton Misenheimer 
&: w. M. A. 

David Lyerly &: 
w. Jane 

Edmund Peck & 
w. Martha 

F. A. Ridenhour &: 
w. Esther 

Wm. Lefler Sc 
w. Mary 

D. M. Lefler & 
w. Elvira 

Wm. A. Moody & 
w. M. L. 

A. L. Barringer & 
Mary 

Marg't. L. Beaver 
(widow) 

Mathias J. Barringer 
Sc Lundy 

Chris tn Lyerly & 
Elizabeth 

Julius Peck & 
Elmira 

Chas. Sides & 
Sophia 

Isaac Shoe & 
Serena 

Isaac Shoe & 
Serena 

Isaac Shoe & 
Serena 

Mathias A. Barrier 
& Polly 



85 



Sept. 20, 1862 
Sept. 26, 1863 

Aug. 30, 1862 
Nov. 1, 1863 

June 14, 1864 
Oct. 15, 1864 

May 3, 1864 
Oct. 15, 1864 

Dec. 29, 1863 
Oct. 15, 1864 

Apr. 16. 1863 
Oct. 15, 1864 

May 3, 1864 
May 28, 1865 

Sept. 23, 1862 
May 28, 1865 

June 11, 1865? 
May 28, 1865 

Apr. 18, 1865 
Nov. 19, 1865 

Apr, 30, 1865 
Nov. 19, 1865 

Aug. 6, 1865 
Nov. 19, 1865 

Jan. 24, 1866 
July 15, 1866 

Jan. 10, 1866 
Aug. 19, 1866 

Oct. 9. 1865 
Aug. 19, 1866 

May 1, 1866 
Sept. 2, 1866 

June 23, 1866 
Sept. 22, 1865 

Aug. 1, 1866 
Nov. 18, 1866 

Feb. 27, 1866 
Oct. 20, 1866 

Dec. 3, 1866 
July 7, 1867 

Nov. 15, 1866 
July 7, 1867 

Dec. 8, 1866 
July 7, 1867 

June 10, 1867 
Sept. 1, 1867 

May 20, 1867 
Sept. 1, 1867 

Feb. 14, 1867 
Sept. 22, 1867 



Julia .\nna Catharine 

Margaret Joann 

^Villiam Rufus 

Thomas Cook 

Robert Gibson 

Roxana Augusta 

^Vm. Geo. Harrison 

Mary Jane 

Martha Ellen 

Lulu Cate 

Martha Elizabeth 

George Thomas 

Caryann Elizabeth 

Jenny Lind Albron 

Lucy Alabama 

Thomas Price 

Eva Ann 

Johu Deberry 

Jenny Brown 
be Clarkson 

Floience Rosa Linn 
Martha Cornelia 
Lucas Oscar 
Amelia Frances 
Julia A. Augusta 
Martha Agnes 



.\lex Barrier & 
Leah 

J. C. Ridenhour & 
Elizabeth 

N. Lefler & M. J. 



Peter Misenheimer 
& Maria 

D. M. Lefler & 
Elvira 

Edmund Peck & 
M. J. 

M. J. Barringer & 
Lundy 

J. A. Fisher & 
C. E. 

J. A. Fisher & 
C. E. 

J. C. Ridenhour &: 
w. E. 

F. A. Ridenhour & 
E. M. 

C. A. Moose 8c 
A. E. 

Claybourn 

Misenheimer 

\Vm. A. Moody & 
M. L. 

Chas. Sides & 
Sophia 

\. Lefler Sc M. J. 

Wm. S. Blackwelder 
& R. L. 

Peter E. Lentz & 
Margt. J. 

David Lyerly & 
wife Jane 

Charles T. & Julia 
(Lyerly) Fisher 

D. W. & Frank 
Pliler 

M. &: M. E. 

Ritchey 

J. A. & Christiana 
Fisher 

G. M. & L. M. 
Misenheimer 

Dan'l. Sj Maryan 
L. C. Pliler 



56 



Aug. 24, 1867 
March 15, 1868 


Julia A. M. 


David & Mary J. 
House 


Oct. 17, 1867 
Apr. 18, 1868 


Julia L. M. 


John L. & 

Nancy M. Peck 


July 4, 1867 
Apr. 19, 1868 


Mary Adaline 


Edmond & Martha 
J. Peck 


Apr. 19, 1867 
May 17, 1868 


Martha Elma 


J. C. & Elizabeth 
Ridenhour 


Jan. 13, 1868 
June 21, 1868 


Mumford D. 


Nelen & Martha 
J. Lefler 


Nov. 29, 1867 
June 21, 1868 


Johu Wesley 


Franklin A. & 
Esther M. Ridenhour 


Oct. 4, 1867 
Aug. 16, 1868 


Henry Clay 


John A. & 

Elizab Troutman 


Sept. 13, 1867 
Aug. 16, 1868 


Mary Magdaline 


Johu H. & Celia 
Underwood 


Nov. 30, 1867 
Aug. 16, 1868 


Tolison Festus 


Edmund A. & 

Canondra E. Pliler 


Jan. 22, 1868 
Sept. 19, 1868 


Attie Sophia 


Chas. J. Sc 
Sophia Sides 


Oct. 24, 1868 
Dec. 19, 1868 


Margaret Cornelia 


J. W. & L. C. 
Misenheimer 


Sept. 25, 1868 
Jan. 17, 1869 


Morgan DeBerry 


John F. & Mary 
E. Moose 


March 10, 1868 
Apr. 24, 1869 


David Plutarch 


Creen H. & Joicy 
C. Sides 


Jan. 12, 1869 
Apr. 24, 1869 


Clayborn Carson 


G. M. & M. L. 
Misenheimer 


Oct. 22, 1868 
Apr. 24, 1869 


Robert Jones 


Marvel A. & Mary 
A. Ritchie 


Aug. 8, 1868 
May 16, 1869 


Marshall Duxant 
McNeely 


VV. A. & Lydia E. 
Misenheimer 


Apr. 10. 1868 
June 13, 1869 


Ila Catharnie 


Daniel & L. C. 
Melchor 


Sept. 6, 1869 
Nov. 21, 1869 


Neely Anna Davis 


Chas. & Julyan 
Fisher 


Sept. 6, 1869 
Nov. 21. 1869 


Charles Adolphus 


Wesley A. & 
Sarah A. Sides 


June 4, 1869 
Nov. 21, 1869 


Minnie Bernice 


W. G. H. & M. C. F. 

Barringer 


May 21, 1869 
March 26, 1870 


Laura A. J. 


E. A. & C. E. 
Pliler 


Oct. 18. 1869 
March 26, 1870 


George Robert 


Neelan & M. J. 
Lefler 


Aug. 26, 1869 
March 27, 1870 


Aurelia H. 


L. R. & Clara S. C. 
Rose 


Aug. 24, 1869 
March 27, 1870 


Anna Bell 


D. H. & Barbara 
L. Ridenhour 


March 16, 1870 
Sept. 18, 1870 


Narina Aurelia 


D. H. &: Sarah 
J. Blackwelder 



87 



Apr. 5, 1870 
Sept. 26, 1870 


Lucas L. Alex 


Julius A. &: 

Christena Fisher 


Oct. 8, 1869 
Sept. 26, 1870 


Martha J. 


Henry W. & 
Amelia Sides 


Sept. 23, 1870 
March 19, 1871 


Virginia Ferlanus 


G. M. & M. L. 
Misenheimer 


June 6, 1870 
May 20, 1871 


Jennie Rose 


J. C. & E. 
Ridenhour 


Sept. 15, 1870 
May 20, 1871 


VV'illiam Juan 


G. H. & Joicy 

Sides 


Nov. 21, 1870 
July 16, 1871 


George Daniel 


Johu E. 8c Elizabeth 
Troutman 


Oct. 16, 1870 
Oct. 14, 1871 


Minnie Leonoka 


D. W. & Franke 
R. Pliler 


Sept. 30, 1870 
Nov. 19, 1871 


Adolphus Asbury 


W. S. & R. L. 
Blackwelder 


Jan. 16, 1861 
Nov. 19, 1871 


Mary Frances 


D. A. &: M. J. 
House 


Dec. 15, 1864 
Nov. 19, 1871 


Johu Wiley 


D. A. & M. J. 

House 


Sept. 10, 1869 
Nov. 19, 1871 


Eva Janette 


D. A. & M. J. 

House 


Dec. 30, 1871 
May 10, 1872 


Rufus Alexander 


W. C. & M. M. 
Barringer 


Oct. 29, 1871 
May 10. 1872 


George Emery 


W. A. Sc M. E. 
Ritchie 


Dec. 30, 1871 
May 10, 1872 


Emmor Narcissus 


E. A. & C. E. 
Pliler 


March 5, 1872 
May 10, 1872 


Lulia Ida 


W. S. & R. L. 
Blackwelder 


Feb. 3, 1862 
July 21, 1872 


Columbus Alexander 


D. A. k M. F. 
House 


May 16, 1872 
Oct. 6, 1872 


Hubbert Bikle 


Dr. L. R. & C. S. C. 
Rose 


Sept. 21, 1872 
Apr. 5, 1873 


Cora Alice 


D. M. 8c M. E. 
Ritchy 


July 15, 1872 
Apr. 5, 1873 


John Wiley 


N. & M. J. Lefler 


Nov. 19, 1872 
Apr. 5, 1873 


Charley Wedington 


D. H. & S. J. 
Blackwelder 


Jan. 7, 1873 
Apr. 5, 1873 


Jonas Lucena 


W. C. & M. M. 
Barringer 


Nov. 9, 1871 
Apr. 5, 1873 


Eva Ann Rose 


W. G. H. &: M. C. F 

Barringer 


June 12, 1873 
Aug. 17, 1873 


Waller Monatha 


C. A. & Frances 
A. Ridenhour 


June 27, 1873 
Nov. 16, 1873 


Thomas McArthur 


J. A. & C. Fisher 


July 14, 1873 
Dec. 20, 1873 


Atwell Shelby 


Geo. H. & Frances 
M. Pliler 



S8 



Sept. 11, 1872 
Dec. 20. 1873 


Ellcr Brown 


Geo. E. & Josephine 
E. Pliler 




Sept. 4, 1873 
March 15, 1874 


Ossian Blakeman 


J. H. & M. J. 
Parker 




May 1, 1873 
April 18, 1874 


Madison Greely 


D. W. & F. R. 
Plyler 




Oct. 2. 1873 
April 18, 1874 


James Conrad 


W. P. & M. A. 

Rowland 




April 8, 1873 
May 16, 1874 


Lovelace Cook 


G. H. & J. 

Sides 




Dec. 9, 1872 
Oct. 17, 1874 


Charles Wesley 


W. L. &: M. M. 
Daniel 




Jan. 2, 1874 
Oct. 17, 1874 


Walter Spencer 


W. L. &: M. M. 

Daniel 




Oct. 17, 1874 




W. L. Daniel, 
Adult 




June 22, 1874 
Nov. 14, 1874 


Ida Geneva 


D. H. & B. M. 

Ridenhour 




? 
Nov. 27, 1874 


Martha Ida 


Wm. & ? Barringer 




Aug. 14. 1874 
Nov. 28, 1874 


Geo. Low Ransom 


F. A. & Esther A. 
Ridenhour 




April 15, 1874 
Nov. 29, 1874 


Lucy May 


Geo. E. & J. E. 
Plyler 




Aug. 1, 1874 
Nov. 29, 1874 


Charlie Walter 


S. W. & F. M. 

Sides 




Aug. 30, 1874 
Feb. 21, 1875 


Canady Washington 


D. H. & Mary 
House 

John Barringer 
Florence Barringer 
adults 




Nov. 14, 1874 




Nov. 7, 1874 
Apr. 17, 1875 


Braxton Eugene 


M. &: M. A. Ritchie 




Sept. 17, 1874 
Apr. 17, 1875 


Thomas Atknison 
(Atkinson) 


E. A. & C. E. 

Plyler 




Nov. 30, 1874 
Sept. 16, 1875 


Albricht Purnell 


Julius C. & E. 
Ridenhour 




July 22, 1875 
Sept. 19, 1875 


Eugene 


Geo. & M. L. 
Sides 


Parents 


May 23, 1875 
Feb. 20, 1876 


Corah Lilly 


G. H. & F. M. 
Pliler 


Parents 


June 21, 1875 
Feb. 20, 1876 


Niny Bernice 


J. H. & J. A. 
Parker 


Parents 


Nov. 5, 1875 
Jan. 16, 1876 


Dewey Ribble 


C. A. & F. A. 

Ridenhour 


Parents 


May 3, 1875 
March 13, 1876 


Hettie Brown 


D. W. & F. R. 
Pliler 


Parents 


Sept. 9. 1875 
Apr. 15, 1876 


Kinny Maxwell 


D. A. & Lizzie 
H. Lefler 


Parents 


Feb. 12. 1876 
July 16, 1876 


Roxa Dora 


D. A. & Mary 
House 


Parents 



..89 



May 21, 1875 
June 18, 1876 


Hubbert Victor 


W. A. & M. E. 
Ritchie 


Parents 


March 15, 1876 
Sept. 17, 1876 


James Victor 


A. P. & Ettie 
Moose 


Parents 


June 18, 1876 
Oct. 15, 1876 


Minnie Tilden 


D. H. & B. L. 

Ridenhour 


Parents 


July 31, 1876 
Oct. 15, 1876 


James Hubbert 


G. M. & M. L. 
Misenheimer 


Parents 


Sept. 28, 1876 
March 18, 1877 


Mackey Julian 


G. H. & F. M. 
Pliler 


Parents 


Nov. 11, 1876 
March 18, 1877 


Mary Ida 


J. H. & M. J. 
Parker 


Parents 


Oct. 14, 1876 
March 30, 1877 


Pearle Oscar (son) 


W. H. & L. J. 

Lyerly 


Parents 


Feb. 28, 1877 
July 15, 1877 


Ernest Dupree 


J. S. &: M. L. 
Ewing 


Parents 


May 22, 1877 
Sept. 16, 1877 


Johney Orado 


G. W. &: F. M. 

Sides 


Parents 


June 3, 1877 
Nov. 18, 1877 


Lessey Bell 


D. A. & Lizzie 
H. Lefler 


Parents 


July 1?, 1877 
Nov. 18, 1877 


Effie Lenoria 


A. P. & Etiie 
Moose 


Parents 


June 3, 1877 
Dev. 15, 1877 


Kirby Moody 


W. A. & M. E. 
Ritchie 


Parents 


Aug. 7, 1877 
Dec. 15, 1877 


Lorance Fillmore 


G. E. & J. E. 
Pliler 


Parents 


Feb. 11, 1875 
May 19, 1878 


Anna Bell 


Emelia Abigail 
Ridenhour 


Mother 


Apr. 1, 1878 
July 2, 1878 


James -\Iison 


D. A. & Mary 
House 


Parents 


Sept. 20. 1878 
Dec. 14, 1878 


Corah Elizabeth 


D. H. & B. L. 
Ridenhour 


Parents 


Feb. 27, 1879 
May 18, 1879 


Edward Walter 


G. H. Sc F. M. 

Pliler 




March 26, 1879 
May 3, 1879 


Bruner 


C. A. &: F. A. 
Ridenhour 


Parents 


Oct. 19, 1879 
Apr. 18, 1880 


Jessie Leenora 
McClay 


D. D. & F. A. V. 
Ritchie 


Parents 


Jan. 13, 1880 
July 4, 1880 


Nanny May 


A. P. &: Ettie 
Moose 


Parents 


Aug. 27, 1879 
July 16, 1880 


David Albert 


W. A. &: M. E. 
Ritchie 


Parents 


Dec. 5, 1879 
Aug. 14, 1880 


Samuel Dudent 


D. A. &: L. H. 
Lefler 


Parents 


June 17, 1880 
Aug. 17, 1880 


Ada Lurena 


G. W. Sc F. M. 
Sides 


Parents 


Aug. 8, 1880 
Aug. 19, 1880 


Anzonetta May 


M. M. & A. E. 
Ritchie 


Parents 


Aug. 9, 1880 
Aug. 28. 1880 


Ernest Felix 


J. F. Sc M. A. E. 

Russell 


Parents 



90 



Apr. 16, 1878 
Aug. 28, 1880 


Edgar Alison 


J. F. & M. A. E. 
Russell 


Parents 


Apr. 9, 1874 
Aug. 28, 1880 


Eugene Thomas 


J. F. & M. A. E. 
Russell 


Parents 


Dec. 4, 1878 
Dec. 19, 1880 


Minnie Roxanna 


C. C. & Manda 
Wyatt 


Parents 


May 21, 1872 
Nov. 26, 1872 


Clarkson Genidus 
(Baptized by Rev. 


G. H. & F. M. Pliler 
Dennie at old church.) 


Parents 


Jan. 13, 1881 
May 15, 1881 


Magie Artis 


David and Mary J. 
House 


Parents 


Apr. 2, 1881 
Oct. 2, 1881 


William Fair 


D. D. Sc F. A. V. 
Ritchie 


Parents 


Oct. 10, 1881 
Oct. 29, 1881 


Lula Gracy 


C. A. & F. A. 
Ridenhour 


Parents 


June 14, 1881 
Sept. 4, 1881 


Joseph Bittle 


D. H. & B. L. 
Ridenhour 


Parents 


June 11, 1881 
May 21, 1882 


Lillie Carian 


J. S. & S. S. 
Misenheimer 


Parents 


Feb. 20, 1882 
May 21, 1882 


Earnes Theophilus 


James A. & M. E. 
Ritchie 


Parents 


Feb. 21, 1882 
May 21, 1882 


Ada Christena 


G. M. & M. L. 
Misenheimer 


Parents 


Sept. 24, 1882 
Feb. 4, 1883 


Bessie McCIay 


A. P. & E. Moose 


Parents 


Sept. 3, 1882 
Nov. 5, 1883 


Loreless Avry 


G. H. & F. M. 
Pliler 


Parents 


Dec. 28, 1882 
Feb. 4, 1883 


Lalah Maria 


J. A. P. & L. C. 
Troutman 


Parents 


Jan. 28, 1883 
March 18, 1883 


Nola Anzonetta 


P. R. & M. J. T. 
Misenheimer 


Parents 


Sept. 21, 1874 
July 1, 1883 


Martin C. 


W. C. & M. M. 
Barringer 


Parents 


Nov. 3, 1874 
July 1, 1883 


Cora C. 


W. C. & M. M. 
Barringer 


Parents 


Jan. 22, 1883 
July 1, 1883 


Mary E. 


W. C. & M. M. 
Barringer 


Parents 


July 14, 1883 
Nov. 14, 1883 


Boyda Craven 


W. A. & M. E. 
Ritchie 


Parents 


Sept. 16, 1883 
Nov. 18. 1883 


Bula Gertrude 


D. H. & B. L. 
Ridenhour 


Parents 


Nov. 20, 1883 
Jan. 20, 1884 


Carles Edward 


C. T. & S. E. 
Ridenhour 


Parents 


Dec. 24, 1883 
Jan. 20, 1884 


Lizzie Agnes Lee 


M. & M. E. 
Ritchie 


Parents 


Jan. 14, 1884 
March 30, 1884 


Orion Delmore 


M. M. & M. L. 
Ritchie 


Parents 


Jan. 14, 1884 
March 30, 1884 


David Foster 


D. D. & F. A. V. 
Ritchie 


Parents 


Dec. 31, 1883 
March 30. 1884 


Georgie Ensonettia 


A. P. & EttJe 
Moose 


Parenu 



91 



Nov. 18, 1881 
Dec. 21, 1881 


Nora Corneil 


D. A. &: L. N. 
Lefler 


Parents 


July 16, 1884 
? 


Johny Edgar 


J. A. P. & L. C. 

Troutman 
(John Albard Price) 


Parents 


Jan. ?, 1885 
Apr. 3, 1885 


Charlie Bruner 


P. R. &: Mollie 
Misenheimer 


Parents 


Apr. 4, 1885 


Allice Berona 


G. M. &: Mary L. 
Misenheimer 


Parents 


Oct. 13, 1885 
Feb. 9, 1886 


Caleb Franklin 


D. A. &: Lizzv H. 
Lefler 


Parents 


Apr. 28, 1885 
Feb. 22, 1886 


Richard Lovelace 


G. A. W. & M. E. 

Crowell 


Parents 


Apr. 30, 1884 
Oct. 18, 1884 


Patient loma 


J. A. & M. E. 
Ritchie 


I'arents 


Aug. 22, 1885 
March 7, 1886 


Franklin EIniira 


A. P. & Ettie 
Moose 


Parents 


Sept. 3, 1885 
Apr. 4, 1886 


Bessie Jane Agnes 


Wm. A. & M. E. 
Ritchie 


Parents 


Jan. 26, 1886 
Apr. 4, 1886 


Lela Satorris Brown 


Bittle D. S; A. L. C. 
Bangle 


Parents 


Apr. 10, 1886 
June 27, 1886 


Maudie Mary Annis 


Reul)en C. & Agnes 
Ritchie 


Parents 


Apr. 11, 1886 
Sept. 5, 1886 


Daisy Dare 


D. D. & F. A. V. 
Ritchie 




Apr. 12, 1886 
July 15, 1886 


Anna Neel 


C. E. & J. E. 

Plyler 




Dec. 14, 1887 
March 17, 1888 


Charels Eduard 


D. A. & Lizzie 
Lefler 


Parents 


Feb. 28, 1888 
May 20, 1888 


George Fernando 


G. M. &: L. M. 

Misenheimer 


Parents 


May 13, 1888 
Aug. 5, 1888 


Annie Lee 


Caleb A. &: F. A. 
Ridenhour 


Parents 


June 7, 1888 
Aug. 5, 1888 


Charlie Daniel 


G. E. & J. E. 
Plyler 


Parents 


May 18, 1888 
Sept. 18, 1888 


Sidney Geo. 


Sidney H. & 

Ellen J. Hearn 


Parents 


May 11, 1888 
Oct. 7, 1888 


Lizzie Brown 


D. D. & F. A. V. 
Ritchie 


Parents 


Aug. 18, 1888 
Oct. 22, 1888 


Ethel Add 


G. H. & F. K. 
Plyler 


Parents 


July 7, 1888 
Nov. 17, 1888 


Onhie Lonarrah 


C. T. & Sarah E. 
Ridenhour 


Parents 


July 11. 1888 
Nov. 4, 1888 


Edwin Cook 


A. P. Sc E. E. 
Moose 




Nov. 6, 1888 
Jan. 17, 1889 


Thomas Cook 


J. A. & M. E. 
Ritchie 




Jan. 5, 1889 
Jan. 31, 1889 


Freddy Washington 


G. A. W. & M. E. 
Crowell 




Oct. 10, 1888 
Feb. 26, 1889 


Jessie Edgar 


B. & A. L. C. 
Bangle 





92 



Sept. ?, 1888 
March 24, 1889 

Oct. 6, 1888 
June 2, 1889 

March 11, 1889 
May 19, 1889 

July 14, 1889 
Aug. 11, 1889 

Sept. 15, 1889 
Oct. 20, 1889 

July 3, 1889 
Dec. 29, 1889 

Nov. 25, 1889 
Dec. 29, 1889 

March 13. 1890 
Aug. 3, 1890 

Aug. 8, 1890 
Nov. 16, 1890 

Sept. 28, 1890 
Jan. 4, 1891 

Apr. 2, 1891 
May 17, 1891 

Apr. 18, 1891 
June 7, 1891 

Dec. 18, 1890 
June 7, 1891 

June 18, 1891 
July 2, 1891 

June 8, 1891 
July 19, 1891 

July 15, 1891 
Oct. 14, 1891 

Oct. 1, 1891 
Apr. 17, 1892 

Apr. 1, 1892 
June 19, 1892 

March 7, 1892 
July 2, 1892 

March 25, 1890 
Aug. 6, 1892 

June 19, 1892 
Aug. 6, 1892 

June 14, 1892 
Aug. 7, 1892 

Aug. 20, 1892 
Oct. 7, 1892 

July 2, 1892 
Nov. 20, 1892 

Oct. 12, 1894 
Dec. 16, 1894 



Claiborne Earl 

James Fetzer 

Advin Leroy 

Bennie Dexter 

Bertie Cecil 

Caleb Cornelius 

Conrad Eugene 

Elsa Bell 

Dona Agnes 

Alma Lillian 

Luverah Scotlan 
Parker 

Nellie Vernet 

Daniel Lee 

Arnolphus 

Treola Blanch 

Clarence Arthur 

John Jefferson 

Clarence Lee 

Myrtle Davit & 
Mandy Ester (twins) 

Homer Clarence 
Lessie Pauline 
Vivia Virginia 
Jennie Vera 
Lizzie Joe Cleveland 
Nanny Virtus 



J. G. & M. R. 
Ritchie 

G. W. & F. M. 

Sides 

L. O. Sc J. B. 
Ritchie 

D. A. & Lizzie 
Lefler 

J. W. & Maggie 
B. Ridenhour 

Chas. B. R: Martha 
J. Ridenhour 

James A. Sc 
Magie Ritchie 

Geo. E. &: Joe 
Plyler 

A. P. & Ettie 
Moose 

J. G. & M. R. 
Ritchie 

Augusta 

Misenheimer 

M. J. M. & M. M. 

Misenheimer 

D. D. & F. A. V. 
Ritchie 

J. W. & M. J. 
Ridenhour 

B. D. Sc A. L. C. 
Bangle 

G. H. & F. M. 
Plyler 

J. W. &: R. L. 
Underwood 

James A. & M. F. 
Ritchie 

John A. Sc M. F. 
Cruse 

G. A. W. & M. F. 
Crowell 

G. A. W. & M. F. 
Crowell 

P. R. & Mollie 
Misenheimer 

C. T. & S. F. 
Ridenhour 

C. A. & F. A. 
Ridenhour 

James A. & M. F. 
Ritchie 



Dead 



93 



Oct. 12, 1894 
March 24, 1895 

Aug. 5, 1892 
May 30, 1895 

July 22. 1894 
May 30, 1895 

Sept. 10, 1894 
July 30, 1895 

March 28, 1895 
Aug. 10. 1895 

Nov. 17, 1895 
Jan. 16, 1896 

Sept. 2, 1895 
Jan. 26, 1896 

Feb. 15, 1896 
June 21, 1896 

July 26, 1894 
July 19, 1896 

May 9, 1896 
July 19, 1896 

July 10, 1896 
Sept. 6, 1896 

July 5, 1896 
Sept. 12, 1896 

July 26, 1896 
Nov. 20, 1896 

July 13, 1896 
Feb. 6. 1897 

Jan. 31, 1897 
May 25. 1897 

Aug. 18, 1898 
Oct. 22, 1898 

July 30, 1898 
Oct. 16, 1898 

May 29, 1898 
Oct. 16, 1898 

Jan. 5, 1899 
May 21, 1899 

June 5, 1899 
Aug. 6, 1899 

Nov. 23, 1899 
Jan. 21, 1900 

Dec. 24. 1899 
March 4, 1900 

July 23, 1899 
Apr. 15, 1900 

Apr. 27, 1900 
June 3, 1900 

May 31, 1900 
Oct. 7, 1900 



Ralph Downing 
Anna E. 
Carl V. 
Cletus A. 
Ralph Leroy 
Benny Street 
Richard Gray 
Desdie Ruth 
Clarence D. 
Johu Willis 
Clarence Richard 
Sallie May Pauline 
Irven Jerome 
Sophronia G. 
Cleona Dale 
Agness Pauline 
Nora Brown 
Theodore Clyde 
Pansy Ree 
Glanna Lilian 
Nola Beatrice 
Hubert Daniel 
Robert Dewey 
Manilla Ree 
Bertie Lee 



D. A. & L. H. 
Lefler 

M. D. & Martha R. 
Barringer 

M. D. & Martha R. 
Barringer 

C. C. & L. C. 

Misenheimer 

John A. & Ida 
G. Ross 

L. O. & J. B. 
Ritchie 

A. P. & E. E. 

Moose 

B. D. & L. C. 

Bangle 

Kelley & Flora 
Honeycutt 

D. A. B. & L. O. V. 

Plyler 

Geo. Isenhour 

Thos. F. 8: Rachel 
C. Crowell 

Eller B. Plyler 

M. D. & M. R. 
Barringer 

M. A. & A. F. 

Barrier 

L. O. Sc J. O. 
Ritchie 

J. A. &: Margaret 
F. Ritchie 

R. M. & Eller B. 
Troutman 

M. J. M. & M. M. 

Misenheimer 

C. G. &: Mattie C. 
Plyler 

W. S. &: Lillie C. 
Blackwelder 

D. R. B. &: Leo O. 
Plyler 

J. W, & M. L 
Ridenhour 

L. O. & Jennie B. 
Ritchie 

Rufus & Filer 
Troutman 



Parents 



Parents 



Parents 



Parents 



Parents 



Parents 



Parents 



94 



Aug. 25, 1899 
Sept. 18, 1899 


Arthor Calwell 


Thom. F. & R. C. 
Crowell 


Parents 


Oct. 28, 1900 
March 3, 1901 


Oscar Hugh 


A. P. & Joan 
Ridenhour 


Parents 


June 7, 1901 
Sept. 1, 1901 


Sadie Lucile 


C. G. & Mattie 
Plyler 


Parents 


Aug. 2, 1901 
Oct. 20, 1901 


Emma Julia 


D. R. B. Sc Leo 
O. Plyler 


Parents 


May 18, 1903 
Aug. 16, 1903 


James Nester 


James A. & 

Maggie Ritchie 


Parents 


Feb. 11, 1903 
Aug. 16, 1903 


Theron Ray 


C. G. & Mattie 
Plyler 


Parents 


Nov. 1, 1901 
Aug. 16, 1903 


Vertis Caroline 


John W. &: Maggie 
B. Ridenhour 


Parents 


Feb. 18, 1899 
Feb. 7, 1904 


Bree Holmes 


B. D. & A. L. C. 

Bangle 


Parents (at home) 


March 5, 1904 
June 5, 1904 


Pearl Elizabeth 


D. E. & Annie 
Ridenhour 


Parents 


July 28, 1904 
Jan. 14, 1905 


Velma Virginia 


M. C. J. & Cora 
E. Plyler 


Parents 


Jan. 19, 1905 
June 18, 1905 


Claudy Alton 


C. G. 8: Mattie 
Plyler 


Parents 


Sept. 11, 1904 
Sept. 2, 1905 


HoIIan Hope 


E. W. & Ida 
Plyler 


Parents 


Sept. 25, 1902 
Sept. 2, 1905 


Alonzo Hiuton 


E. W. & Ida 
Plyler 


Parents 


July 19, 1904 
Sept. 3, 1905 


Earl Fritchic 


Clifford & Arrow 
Barrier 


Parents 


Aug. 26, 1905 
Sept. 29, 1905 


Mattie Ceacel 


Thom. &: Bennie 
Crowell 


Parents 


Sept. 9, 1903 
Sept. 29, 1905 


Johu Allen 


Thom. & Bennie 
Crowell 


Parents 


Oct. 24, 1898 
Sept. 29, 1905 


Charlie Ike 


C. B. & Maggie 
Lefler 


Parents 


Nov. 21, 1905 
Jan. 4, 1906 


Louise Grace 


L. A. Sc Grace 
Plyler 


L. A. F. 
F. A. R. 


Nov. 15, 1905 
Jan. 21, 1906 


Horace Macon 


A. P. & Joan 
Ridenhour 




Nov. 7, 1905 
Feb. 18, 1906 


Vern Andrew 


C. C. Sc Pearl 
Misenheimer 




Dec. 5, 1905 
Apr. 1, 1906 


Mary Katharine 


James & Nolah 
Fisher 




Jan. 18, 1905 
May 19, 1906 


Jessie Elma 


Johu & Daisy 

Sides 




Apr. 24, 1904 
Jan. 17, 1906 


Cledus 


L. A. & Martha 
Ridenhour 




May 19, 1906 
Aug. 19, 1906 


Dewie Holland 


L. O. & J. B. 
~^, Ritchie 




Oct. 31, 1906 
Nov. 23, 1906 


Hurley Croven 


Boyden & Rosie 
Ritchie 





95 



July 28, 1906 
Apr. 7, 1907 


Paul Leroy 


C. G. &: Mattie 
Plyler 


Oct. 18. 1906 
Apr. 21, 1907 


Hugh Sylvester 


W. A. Sc Ossie 
Cody 


Jan. 1, 1907 
Apr. 21, 1907 


Walter Lee 


C. C. &: Pearl 
Misenheimer 


Apr., 1907 
June 18, 1907 


Virgie Lee 


H. H. & Agnes 
Blackwelder 


Nov. 28, 1887 
Aug. 4, 1907 


Bessie Ray 


J. S. &: Susan 
Misenheimer 


Apr. 4, 1886 
Aug. 4, 1907 


Nora Rachel 


J. S. & Susan 
Misenheimer 


Dec. 3, 1907 
March 15, 1908 


Bruner Reed 


B. D. & Nora 
Ridenhour 


Apr. 20, 1907 
Apr. 4, 1908 


Ernie Clarence 


John W. & M. I. 
Ridenhour 


March 19, 1908 
June 7, 1908 


Ruth \'irginia 


C. C. & Pearl Parents 
Misenheimer 


Sept. 12, 1908 
March 7, 1909 


Clyde William 


C. G. &: Mattie Parents 
Plyler 


Nov. 18, 1906 
Nov. 25, 1907 


Mary Cathaline 


B. F. & G. M. 
Ritchie 


Feb. 17, 1907 
Nov. 25, 1907 


Thurman Cleo 


May Ritchie 


May 11, 1908 
Sept. 13, 1908 


Minnie Jazeline 


M. J. & C. F. 
Plyler 


Jan. 16, 1908 
Sept. 13, 1908 


Helen Drewry Alice 


J. B. &: H. C. 

Ridenhour 


Dec. 19, 1905 
Sept. 15, 1908 


Dorothy Olrich 


B. D. & M. F. 

Bangle 


May 11, 1907 
Sept. 15, 1908 


Eugene Duey 


B. D. &: M. F. 

Bangle 


Feb. 5, 1908 
Aug. 30, 1908 


Floy Addison 


G. B. &: L. J. 

Isenhour 


Oct. 17, 1908 
Dec. 6, 1908 


Letha Ora 


Henry H. &: A. B. 
Blackwelder 


Oct. 22, 1908? 
Feb. 21, 1909 


Mary Francis 


Chas. A. & Anna 
L. Misenheimer 


Dec. 15, 1907 
March 8, 1909 


Hilda McRae 


W. Robb Sc Geo. 
Anna Blackwelder 


Mav 30, 1909 
July 4, 1909 


Banks Daniel 


C. Ed. &: L. M. 
Lefler 


July 29, 1909 
Jan. 2, 1910 


Author Monroe 


C. C. & G. 

Misenheimer 


Nov. 29, 1909 
June 19, 1910 


Dwight Byron 


V. O. &: Ethel 
A. Dutton 


March 2, 1910 
Sept. 4, 1910 


Daniel Cletus 


W. A. & Ossie 
Cody 


Sept. 19, 1910 
March 5, 1911 


Tansie Marie 


G. R. &: Laura 
J. Isenhour 



96 



Nov. 3, 1910 
March 5, 1911 

March 28, 1911 
Aug. 20, 1911 

March 1, 1911 
Sept. 17, 1911 

Apr. 10, 1911 
Oct. 1, 1911 

June 15, 1912 
Aug. 31, 1912 

Oct. 16, 1911 
Aug. 21, 1912 

March 9, 1912 
Sept. 1, 1912 

Nov. 6, 1912 
Nov. 29, 1912 

July 29, 1910 
Sept. 1, 1912 

Aug. 10, 1911 
Dec. 10, 1911 

Oct. 11, 1912 
Jan. 12, 1913 



Norman Ritchie 
Phillip Lane 
Cleo Elizabeth 
Ernest Grady 
Ruby Moose 
Bethel Virginia 
Claud Heath 
Hellen Gertrude 
Lena Brown 
Charles Payne 
William Henry 



A. C. & May 
Bolton 

B. D. & Nora C. 
Ridenhour 

A. G. & J. F. 

Ridenhour 

F. G. & Mattie 
C. Plyler 

C. F. & May 
Lefler 

W. A. & Ossie 
Cody 

A. C. Sc A. May 

Bolton 

M. J. & Cora F. 
Plyler 

B. D. & Minnie 
Bangle 

C. B. & Annie 
Misenheimer 

Henry H. &: Agnes 
Blackwelder 



MARRIAGES FROM BETHEL LUTHERAN RECORD 

Mr. Morgan A. Walcher, Miss Margaret C. Moose Dec. 1, 1858 

Witnesses: John F. Moose, 
Miss Sophia F. Walcher 

Mr. Lucas O. Ritchie, Miss Jennie B. Lyerle Feb. 1, 1888 

Witnesses: By congregation 

Mr. J. W. Ridenhour, Miss Maggie I. Cruse Nov. 22, 1888 

Witnesses: John Hall, 
Miss M. F. Ridenhour 

Caleb A. Moose, Miss M. L. C. Pliler Dec. 18, 1888 

Witness: Daniel Rogers 

Van Fisher, Minnie Ridenhour Apr., 1893 

Witness: Martin Barringer 

A. F. Ridenhour, Joann Barrier March 25, 1900 

Witness: W. Lipe 



97 



RECORD FROM GRAVESTONES 

INFORMATION FROM GRAVESTONES IN THE CEMETERY 
OF BETHEL GERMAN REFORMED CHURCH, NO^V UNITED 
CHURCH OF CHRIST, STANLY COUNTY, N. C. (Copied July 
15, 16, by Carl T. Moose, Concord; and after July 16, 1966, copied by 
Mrs. Holly (Bessie Allman) Lentz, until August 1974.) 

Allman, Cletus W., b. 10 16 1906; d. 8 18 1939. 

Allman, Henry Thomas, b. 6 22 1883; d. 8 28 1964. (Wife Jennie Lynn 

Shue). 
Allman, Jennie Shue, wife of Henry Thomas, b. 1 14 1883; d. 8 25 1964. 
Almond, Mary J., wife of George B. Kearns, b. 4 11 1866; d. 9 5 1942. 
Austin, Pattie Jean, wife of Cecil Joe Barrier, b. 6 4 1926. 

Barnhardt, Alfred B., b. 3 31 1837; d. 11 20 1871. (^Vife Mary A. Barn- 

hardt). 
Barnhardt, Elizabeth, wife of John Christian Barnhardt, b. 9 4 1796; d. 

7 16 1848. 
Barnhardt, George, Colonel, wife Martha, b. 12 17 1791; d. 9 27 1871. 
Barnhardt, George H., b. 4 21 1870; d. 1 12 1892. 
Barnhardt, Henry William, b. 8 26 1830; d. 4 6 1848. 
Barnhardt, Infant daughter of J. E. H. and J. A. Barnhardt, b. &: d., 

3 17 1875. 
Barnhardt, Infant son of J. E. H. and J. A. Barnhardt, b. & d., 9 15 

1876. 
Barnhardt, Infant daughter, John C. & Elizabeth, b. 16 Aug., 1817; d. 

18 Aug., 1817. 
Barnhardt, Infant daughter, John C. & Elizabeth, b. 8 8 1830; d. 8 10 

1830. 
Barnhardt, Infant son, John C. &: Elizabeth, b. 2 14 1822; d. 2 16 1822. 
Barnhardt, Infant son, John C. & Elizabeth, b. 6 24 1829; d. 6 26 1829. 
Barnhardt, J. E. H., b. 5 20 1839; d. 5 23 1882. 
Barnhardt, James Henderson, son of J. E. H. and J. A., b. 1 31 1874; d. 

12 24 1875. 
Barnhardt, John Christian, b. 3 25 1786; d. 9 1 1854. CWife Elizabeth). 
Barnhardt, John M., b. 9 16 1821; d. 11 20 1883. 
Barnhardt, Lawson L., son of George E. &: S., d. 8 23 1857, 3 months, 

16 days. 
Barnhardt, Martha, b. 2 17 1803; d. 7 16 1868. 
Barnhardt, Mary A., b. 5 6 1831; d. ; (\Vife of Alfred B). 
Barnhardt, Mathias, b. 4 6 1752; d. 6 6 1818. (^Vife Anna Margaret 

Peck.) 
Barnhardt, Peter Theophilus, b. 4 11 1823; d. 1 14 1841. 

98 



Barrier, Anna L., b. 4 20 182; d. 12 31 1867. (Wife of Daniel M. 

Moose.) 
Barrier, Barbara, b. 11 4 1771; d. 11 17 1843. (Wife of John Barrier). 
Barrier, C. H., b. 1 12 1824; d. 9 5 1862. 
Barrier, C. S., b. 2 7 1789; d. 10 5 1857. 
Barrier, Caleb, b. 9 30 1856; d. 5 22 1935. (Wife Margaret C. Hur- 

locker). 
Barrier, Caleb M., 11 16 1875; d. 2 11 1902. 
Barrier, Catharine, b. ; d. 10 10 1852 50 y. 10m, 18d. (Wife of E. 

Barrier). 
Barrier, Catherine Elizabeth, b. 1872; d. 1928. 
Barrier, Cecil Joe, b. 7 12 1912; d. 2 19 1944 WW II. (Wife Pattie Jean 

Austin). 
Barrier, Charlie A., b. 3 11 1877; d. 12 16 1938. (Wife Sarah Jane Hur- 

locker). 
Barrier, Clotilda, b. 10 17 1839; d. 7 3 1915, Wife of John A. Barrier. 
Barrier, Cora Belle, b. 1 3 1891; d. 5 26 1967. Wife of John Dave Har- 

wood. 

Barrier, Daniel M., b. 9 17 1852; d. 11 13 1898. 

Barrier, Doyle S., b. 11 28 1885; d. 2 weeks. (Son of Henry Barrier.) 

Barrier, Easter, b. 3 15 1796; d. 2 26 1862. 

Barrier, Edith, b. 4 4 1923; d. 9 30 1923. (Daughter of Horace F. & 

Mabel Barrier.) 
Barrier, Eliza Jane, b. 7 13 1859; d. 5 16 1926. (Wife of Henry Davis 

Barrier). 
Barrier, Elizabeth, b. 9 30 1846; d. 3 6 1887. 
Barrier, Gatha L. b. 2 5 1898; d. 8 3 1960. 
Barrier, George B., b. 10 15 1861; d. 11 21 1937. 
Barrier, Henry, b. 4 30 1850; d. 11 22 1889. 

Barrier, Henry Davis, b. 4 4 1849; d. 5 1 1936 (Wife was Eliza Jane). 
Barrier, Horace F., b. 8 10 1886; d. 12 12 1962. (Wife Freda Mabel 

Wagner, b. 10 9 1886, d. 10 14 1939). 
Barrier, Infant daughter of W. C. &: S. E. Barrier, b. & d., 3 21 1881. 
Barrier, J. Wesley, b. 11 5 1850; d. 5 \6 1926. 
Barrier, Jacob L., b. 9 30 1859; d. 12 6 1932. 
Barrier, Jason F., b. 7 22 1896; d. 12 23 1896; Son of W. C. & S. E. 

Barrier. 
Barrier, Jennie L., b. 9 25 1884; d. 12 23 1959. 
Barrier, John, b. 10 23 1770; d. 12 9 1840 (Wife Barbara Barrier.) 
Barrier, John, b. 8 24 1796; d. 8 22 1889. (Wife Easter Barrier.) 
Barrier, John A., b. 10 30 1844; d. 6 19 1925. (M^ife Clotilda Barrier). 
Barrier, Leah, b. 7 11 1823; d. 6 24 1868. (Wife of A. Barrier). 
Barrier, Lizzie Joan, 10 22 1879; d. 7 20 1942. (Wife of C. D. Fisher). 

99 



Barrier, Luther A., b. 6 28 1888; d. 4 15 1935. 

Barrier, M. A., b. 3 6 1856; d. 10 3 1857. 

Barrier, Mary, b. 10 9 1787; d. 9 26 1835. (Wife of Samuel Barrier). 

Barrier, Mattie J., b. 9 20 1882; d. 8 25 1948. 

Barrier, Millie A., b. 4 25 1852; d. 11 12 1929. (Sister of Sallie E. Bar- 
rier). 

Barrier, Millie E., b. 7 25 1858; d. 8 22 1882. (Wife of Jacob Barrier). 

Barrier, Poly, b. 6 10 1830; d. 5 14 1901. 

Barrier, Sallie, b. 12 15 1832; d. 7 11 1916. (Daughter of John &: Easter 
Barrier). 

Barrier, Sallie E., b. 1 1 26 1853; d. 3 13 1940. (Sister to Millia A. Bar- 
rier). 

Barrier, Samuel, b. 5 5 1782; d. 3 25 1845. (\Vife was Mary Barrier). 

Barrier, Sarah E., b. 12 22 1854; d. 9 15 1911. (^Vife of ^V. C. Barrier.) 

Barrier, Sophia, b. 10 3 1804; d. 6 21, 1884. 

Barrier, Soronie S., b. 6 30 1886; d. 6 28 1887. (Daughter of AV. C. & 
S. E. Barrier). 

Barrier, W. C, b. 5 29 1856; d. 4 23 1928. (Married to Sarah E. Barrier). 

Barrier, William P., b. 4 6 1889; d. 11 11 1890. (Son of M\ C. &; S. E. 
Barrier). 

Barringer, Esther, d. 9- 1 year; Daughter of "\V. G. H. &: M. C. Bar- 
ringer). 

Barringer, Infant Sons (twins) b. & d. 2 3 1946. (Sons of R. M. &: Jewel 
Barringer). 

Barringer, Infant Son, b. 9 6 1943; d. 9 7 1943. (Son of R. M. & Jewel 
Barringer). 

Barringer, John E., b. 7 31 1878; d. 9 30 1879. (Son of \V. G. H. &: M. C. 
Barringer). 

Barringer, John J. D., b. 2 18 1845; d. 9 5 1863. 

Barringer, Leo P., b. 7 21 1926; d. 9 9 1948. 

Barringer, Margaret, b. 5 10 1802; d. 9 26 1843. (Second "Wife of John 
Moose.) 

Barringer, Matthew, b. 12 15 1801; d. 4 29 1853. (Wife Rebecca Bar- 
ringer). 

Barringer, Minnie B. (Daughter of "\V. G. H. &: M. C. Barringer). 

Barringer, Rebecca, b. d. 4 8 1884. (Wife of Matthias Barringer) . 

Barringer, Titus E., b. Aug. 9, 1892; d. March 9, 1972. 

Biles, Rosina, b. d. 8 24 1864. 37 years, 6 months, 17 days. 

Black, Sarah Elizabeth, b. 6 11 1932; d. 7 18 1949. (Daughter of Harvev 
and Glenna Lentz Black.) 

Blackwelder, Barbara J., b. 6 6 1854; d. 8 9 1855. (Daughter of E. W. & 
E. Blackwelder). 

100 



Blackwelder, Charles W., b. 11 19 1872; d. 2 6 1936. (Wife Frances 
Penninger). 

Blackwelder, D. H., b. 9 7 1848; d. 11 14 1924. (Wife M. C. S. E.) 

Blackwelder, Edmond W., b. 10 20 1818; d. 3 25 1871. (Wife Eliza- 
beth L.). 

Blackwelder, Elizabeth L., b. 3 10 1818; d. 12 16 1880. (Wife of Ed- 
mond W.) 

Blackwelder, Gurley, b. ; d. 12 28 1967. 

Blackwelder, John Willie, d. 4 5 1844, Age 3 years, 15 days. (Son of 
Allen M. & Martha B. Blackwelder). 

Blackwelder, Julia A., b. 10 1 1843; d. 7 1 1902. 

Blackwelder, Lizzore C, b. 11 21 1896; d. 7 29 1911. (Daughter of G. P. 
& S. A. V. Blackwelder). 

Blackwelder, M. C. S. E., b. 4 23 1850; d. 12 17 1905. (Wife of D. H. 
Blackwelder). 

Blackwelder, Martha Clementine, d. 10 27 1848; 2 yrs. 10 m., 25 days. 
(Daughter of Allen M. & Martha Blackwelder). 

Blackwelder, Mary C, b. 3 5 1841; d. 8 19 1914. 

Blackwelder, Monola C, b. 12 25 1898; d. 7 28 1911. (Daughter of G. P. 
Sc S. A. V. Blackwelder). 

Blackwelder, Noah N., b. 1904; d. 1959. 

Blackwelder, Mrs. Noah, b. 1905; d. 1967. 

Blackwelder, William, b. 1848; d. 10 18 1848; 4 months 28 days. (Son 
of Allen M. & Martha Blackwelder). 

Blalock, George Burvis, b. 8 7 1925; d. 6 7 1950. 

Broome, Badger Franklin, b. November 21, 1909; d. Sept. 12, 1973. 

Burleyson, Mrs. Shuford (Verona), b. April 4, 1904; d. Sept. 5, 1973. 

C. S., b. 2 7 1789; d. 10 5 1857. 

Cathcart, Infant Daughter of B. L. Cathcart, Jr., Mr. & Mrs., b. &: d. 
10 18 1951. 

Cauble, John L. A., b. 9 25 1876; d. 12 11 1876. 

Cline, Miriam Elaine, b. 7 10 1941; d. 7 11 1941. (Daughter of Mr. & 
Mrs. Mack Ivey Cline). 

Cruse, Adaline Shoe, b. 2 27 1866; d. II 28 1935. 

Cruse, Calvin A., b. 1 3 1899; d. 12 14 1951. (Wife Estelle M. Pen- 
ninger). 

Cruse, Mrs. Estelle, b. 1 30 1896; d. 8 22 1970. 

Cunningham, George T., b. 8 17 1851; d. 2 29 1872. 

Cunningham, Dr. J. T., b. 10 10 1817; d. (Wife Margaret). 

Cunningham, Laura C, Daughter of J. T. and Margaret Cunningham. 

Cunningham, Margaret A., b. 7 23 1828; d. 10 16 1866. (Wife of J. T. 
Cunningham). 

101 



Dohm, Mrs. Dora, b. 3 4 1883; d. 8 30, 1968. 

Dry, Sarah E., b. 1848; d. 1926. (Wife of Victor C. Lentz). 

Drye, Ida M., b. 4 28 1913 (Wife of Bruner Ray Hurlocker). 

Fisher, Agnes G., b. 3 13 1879; d. 8 4 1949 (Wife of J. Wade Moose). 
Fisher, C. D., b. 12 23 1875; d. 9 17 1956. (Wife Lizzie Joan Barrier). 
Fisher, C. E., b. 11 19 1837; d. 6 20 1899. (Married J. A. Fisher). 
Fisher, C. W., b. 2 1 1882; d. 11 8 1907. 

Fisher, Daniel, b. 10 3 1813; d. 6 14 1891. (Married Leah Fisher). 
Fisher, Daniel J., b. 2 20 1852; d. 9 6 1929. {^Viie Martha Lyerly). 
Fisher, Frances, b. 6 10 1868; d. 3 1 1953. (^Vife of Rufus Moose). 
Fisher, Harold, b. &: d. 1937. (Son of Paul D. and Minnie Fisher). 

Fisher, J. A., b. 5 28 1836; d. 11 26 1925. (Married C. E. Fisher) . 
Fisher, L. E., b. 10 22 1860; d. 5 11 1916. (AVife of D. M. Lowder). 
Fisher, Leah, b. 11 21 1811; d. 10 4 1896. (W^ife of Daniel Fisher). 
Fisher, Lora B., b. 9 28 1871; d. 1127 1931. (Wife of ^Villiam F. Moose). 
Fisher, Louvina Commillo, b. 11 12 1858; d. 4 4 1932. (Wife of Daniel 

E. Palmer). 
Fisher, Lucas A., b. 4 5 1870; d. 1 5 1925. (Son of J. A. Sc C. E. Fisher). 
Fisher, Mamie E., b. 7 17 1888; d. 4 21 1891. Daughter Daniel J. & M. A. 

Fisher.) 
Fisher, Minnie F., b. 1910; d. 1962. (Wife of Paul D. Fisher). 
Fisher, Paul, b. 1 28 1907; d. 1 17 1972. 

Fisher, Paul D., b. 1907; d. 1935. (Married Minnie F. Fisher). 
Fisher, Ralph D., b. 1906; 1st. Wife, Sarah J. Hatley, b. 1902; d. 1942; 

2nd. Wife, Mary Safrit, b. 1901. 
Fisher, Ray, b. 1934; d. i935. Son of Paul D. & Minnie F. Fisher. 
Furr, Flora, b. 2 19 1888; d. 10 16 1923. (Wife of Gurley D. Shoe). 

Goodman, Mrs. Jack (nee Merlie Hurlocker); b. Feb. 8, 1917; d. Jan. 8, 

1967. Age 49. 
Gray, Emma E., b. 7 15 1914. Married James H. Lowder. 
Green, Margaret A., b. 4 6 1835; d. 4 12 1917. 
Green, W. E., b. 8 10 1824; d. 12 14 1906. 
Gullit, Louiza Jane, b. 10 27 1863; d. 2 12 1893. Married Martin Shoe. 

H. F. 1842. 

Hahn, Minnie, b. 6 22 1877; d. 12 6 1960. md. Martin L. Penninger. 
Harkey, Agnes Shoe, b. 3 6 1873; 
Hartman, Eunice M., b. 10 26 1899; d. 3 17 1901. 
Hartman, Infant daughter of J. T. & Julia, b. &: d. 12 2 1895. 
Hartman, J. Thomas, b. 3 28 1862; d. 2 12 1914. (Wife Julia C. Peck). 
Hartman, Kathryn V., b. 1 24 1908; d. 11 1 1949. (Wife of Clarence 
Whitley.) 

102 



Hansen, Mickey Lee, b. 12 5 1941; d. 3 8 1961. 

Harwood, Andrew J., b. 4 28 1878; d. 1 7 1968. (Wife Annie Sides). 

Harwood, John Dave, b. 5 12 1890; d. 7 15 1952. (Wife Cora Belle 

Barrier). 
Hatley, Ceily, b. 2 20 1820; d. 1 25 1859. 

Hatley, Sarah J., b. 1902; d. 1942. (1st wife of Ralph D. Fisher). 
Henley, Nary Jane, b. 1868; d. 1917. 

Henley, Rufus E., b. 7 1 1899; d. 2 15 1933. 
Herlocker, Thomas Spencer, b. 1 19 1920; d. 10 8 1950. WW II. 
Honeycutt, Keith, b. d. 2 28 1969. Age 59. 

Hopkins, Ray Oney, b. 7 31 1899; d. 1 13 1966. 
Huneycutt, H. F., 1842. 

Huneycutt, Mirtie M., b. 8 8 1890; d. 3 16 1891. (Daughter of J. &: M. E. 

Huneycutt). 
Hurlocker, Bruner Ray, b. 9 30 1909; (Married Ida M. Drye). 

Hurlocker, Clifford Lee, b. 12 30 1914; d. 11 23 1931. (Son of John C. & 

Eltha Hurlocker). 
Hurlocker, Ellen Ruth Shoe, b. 1 15 1900; d. 8 8 1960. Wife of Barney 

N. Hurlocker. 
Hurlocker, Eltha H., b. 8 19 1886; (Wife of John Crooks Hurlocker). 
Hurlocker, Emmer, b. 3 25 1876; d. 5 13 1878. 

Hurlocker, Eva M., b. 6 6 1843; d. 2 19 1929. (Married Moses Hur- 
locker). 
Hurlocker, George C, b. 11 9 1827; d. 11 26 1916. (Wife Susann Sides) . 
Hurlocker, George J., b. 8 25 1862; d. 4 23 1936. (Wife Eveann Isen- 

hour) 
Hurlocker, Infant daughter of Moses and Eva M. Hurlocker. 
Hurlocker, John Crooks, b. 9 11 1879; d. 8 5 1957. (Wife was Eltha 

Hurlocker). 
Hurlocker, Larah J., b. 8 1 1868; d. 5 13 1869. 

Hurlocker, Margaret C, b. 7 19 1862; d. 9 11 1944. (Wife of Caleb 

Barrier). 
Hurlocker, Martin Deberry, b. 5 8 1876; d. 1 3 1937. 

Hurlocker, Meredith Drye, b. 9 3 1951; d. 6 10 1965. (Son of Bruner R. 
&: Ida Hurlocker). 

Hurlocker, Moses, b. 3 5 1840; d. 3 9 1882. (Married Eva M. Hurlocker.) 

Hurlocker, Sarah Jane, b. 3 11 1867; d. 11 11 1928. (Wife of Charlie A. 
Barrier). 

Isenhour, Eleanor, b. 4 5 1865; d. 2 12 1943. (Wife of George J. Hur- 
locker). 

Isenhour, Ernest, b. 10 15 1900; d. 12 21 1969. Age 69. 

Isenhour, Eveann C, b. 4 5 1865; d. 2 12 1943. ' 

103 



Johnson, Elizer B., b. 5 13 1894; d. 2 13 1945. (Wife of Rev. Lee 

Johnson). 
Johnson, Viola Mae, b. 5 16 1920; d. 8 27 1953. (Daughter of Rev. Lee 

Johnson). 

Kearns, George B., b. 11 31 1877; d.7 7 1935. (Married Mary J. Almond). 

Layerle, Hector, b. 10 4 1825; d. 6 30 1826. Son of Jacob and Mary M. 

Lyerly. 
Lefler, Daniel, b. 3 30 1811; d. 12 20 1872 (md. L Sarah Lowder, b. 7 25 

1809; d. 1 27 1844); 2. Jane Rowland, b. 3 27 1825; d. 11 14 1878). 
Lefler, Essie, b. 8 21 1899; d. 9 29 1900; Daughter of M. D. and Sallie 

Lefler. 
Lefler, Green, b. 6 6 1851; d. 2 14 1873. 
Lefler, Nelen, b. 1 17 1832; d. 2 28 1887. C. S. A. 
Lefler, John M., b. 12 27 1849; d. 3 8 1884. 
Lefler, Maude C, b. 7 16 1785; d. 8 24 1877. 
Lefler, Susan, b. 3 24 1842; d. 7 29 1871. 
Lentz, Adolphus Crooks, b. June 24, 1877; d. Feb. 28, 1974. 
Lentz, Anna B., b. 8 20 1873; d. 6 8 1955. Wife of George H. Moose. 
Lentz, Bobby Lee, b. 9 28 1943; d. 7 10 1964. Pvt. U. S. Marine Corps. 
Lentz, Carl R. 6 8 1901; d. 1 5 1927. Son of A. C. Sc M. A. Lentz. 
Lentz, Desda Kendall, b. 12 24 1876; d. 4 27 1958. Second wife of A. C. 

Lentz. 
Lentz, Infant daughter, b. 4 7 1883; child of V. C. 8c S. F. Lentz. 
Lentz, Infant son, b. 3 26 1876; child of V. C. &: S. F. Lentz. 
Lentz, Infant son, b. 4 28 1890; child of V. C. 2c S. F. Lentz. 
Lentz, Jerry A., 1 8 1939; d. 2 15 1939; Son of Holly M. and Bessie A. 

Lentz. 
Lentz, Malcolm G., b. 11 2 1871; d. 12 25 1947. Wife Martha Moose. 
Lentz, Mary Anna, b. 12 8 1872; d.3 18 1909. 1st wife of A. C. Lentz. 
Lentz, Ralph, b. 11 24 1894; d. 11 27 1894. Twin son of Malcolm G. & 

Martha Lentz. 
Lentz, Ray, b. 11 24 1894; d. 12 4 1894. Twin son of Malcolm G. & 

Martha Lentz. 
Lentz, Roy H., b. 8 23 1899; d. 5 24 1938, Son of A. C. Sc M. A. Lentz. 
Lentz, Victor Columbia, b. 1850; d. 1936. Wife Sarah Dry. 

Little, E. P., b. 1907; d. 11 4 1970; age 63. 
Loetter, Theophilus (Lefler). 

Lowder, Daniel Lewis, b. 9 1 1882; d. 11 16 1963. Wife Lillie Shoe. 
Lowder, D. M., b. 11 25 1848; d. 10 17 1937. Married L. E. Fisher. 
Lowder, James H., b. 7 8 1898; d. 11 2 1951 Married Emma E. Gray. 
Lowder, Lillie Rosetta Shoe, wife of Daniel Lewis Lowder. b. 4 17 86; 

d. 6 16 1974. 

104 



Lowder, Sarah, b. 7 25 1809; d. 1 27 1844. First wife of Daniel Lefler. 

Lyerlee, Ellen E. b. 10 14 1837; d. 1 9 1921. Wife of Christopher 

Lyerlee. 

Lyerlee, Infant Son of William A. & Rachel R. Lyerly, b. &: d. 10 8 1898. 

Lyerlee, Infant Son of William A. Sc Rachel R. Lyerly, b. &: d. 9 10 1897. 

Lyerlee, Marshall C, b. 9 28 1867; d. 9 12 1890. 

Lyerlee, Rosa L., b. 11 26 1883; d. 8 6 1889, Daughter of Wm. A. Sc 

Rachel Lyerlee. 
Lyerlee, W. B., b. 6 13 1879; d. 7 24 1901; Son of Wm. A. & Rachel 

Lyerlee. 
Lyerly, Christopher— A Revolutionary Soldier under General George 

Washington who sold one hundred acres of land to this Church. 

in 1809. 
Lyerly, Claborn, b. 11 19 1816; d. 12 4 1867. 

Lyerly, Jacob Lyerly, b. 10 2 1789; d. 7 18 1854. Wife Mary Moose. 
Lyerly, Jacob, Son of Christopher Lyerly who sold five acres of land to 

this Church in 1848. 
Lyerly, Joicy C, b. 11 5 1846; d. 4 2 1921. Wife of Green H. Sides. 
Lyerly, Martha A., b. 12 7 1858; d. 3 23 1937. Married Daniel J. Fisher. 
Lyerly, Rachel Rebecca, b. 8 18 1856; d. 10 15 1932. 
Lyerly, Ray P., b. 9 26 1923; d. 11 11 1923. Son of J. L. & V. A. Lyerly. 
Lyerly, William Ausborne, b. 11 2 1856; d. 2 24 1931. 
Lyerly, William C, b. 11 8 1889; 3 22 1954. Minister of the Gospel, 

1914-1954. 

Melchor, Caleb A., b. 8 6 1830; d. 1 17 1848. 

Melchor, John, b. 2 28 1790; d. 11 30 1880. 

Melchor, Sophia, b. 6 1 1801; d. M^ife of John Melchor. 

Miller, Ellen, b. 9 30 1882; d. 1 31 1844. 

Misenheimer, Elizabeth, b. ; d. 1 22 1854. 63 years, 7 months, 19 

days. 
Misenheimer, George, b. ; d. 6 9 1858; Married Elizabeth. 

Moody, Mary L., b. 10 21 1839; d. 6 4 1908, Wife of William Moody. 
Moody, William A., b. 4 13 1838; d. 1 13 1915. Married to Mary Moody. 
Moose, Mr. A. F.. b. 1 7 1885; d. 10 23 1968 Age 83 years. 
Moose, Mrs. A. F., 5 4 1865; d. 8 3 1968 Age 83 years. 

Moose, Albert T., b. 4 3 1861; d. 3 years, 6 months, 17 days. Son of C. H. 
& A. E. Moose. 

Moose, Alice, b. 12 17 1868; d. 4 1 1957. Married Daniel Albert Shoe. 

Moose, Alice Henrietta, b. 4 4 1869; d. 3 3 1948. Wife of Jonas N. 
Moose. 

Moose, Amelia E., b. 8 31 1831; d. 7 18 1888. Elmira Ridenhour, wife 
of C. A. Moose. 

105 



Moose, Barbara, b. 3 11 1764; d. 8 24 1848. Wife of Jacob Moose-Bar- 
bara Biishard. 

Moose, Bertha, J. V., b. 12 30 1899; d. 3 1 1900. Daughter of J. Wade 
and Agnes G. Moose. 

Moose, Boyd Artz, b. 6 20 1883; d. 9 11 1962. 

Moose, C. A., b. 7 4 1826; d. 3 12 1907. C. S. A. Married to Amelia 
Moose. 

Moose, Catharine (Kelly), b. 4 10 1817; d. 1 15, 1885. Third wife of John 
Moose. 

Moose, D. Monroe, 1 21 1830; d. 2 4 1901. Married to Sophia. 

Moose, Daniel M., b. 1 14 1831; d. 1 2 1921. Married Anna L. Barrier. 

Moose, Elizabeth Sarah, b. 1 1 1835; d. 1 8 1896. AVife of D. E. Riden- 
hour. 

Moose, Elsie Marie, b. 5 6 1889; d. 8 30 1909. Daughter of Luther H. &: 

3 7 7 Q 

Eva F. Moose. 
Moose, George, b. 8 22 1800; d. 11 30 1851. Married Maria Peck. 
Moose, George H., b. 4 29 1875; d. 1 11 1956. Married to Anna B. Lentz. 
Moose, George T., b. 8 6 1865; d. 6 23 1888. Son of C. A. and A. E. 

Moose. 
Moose, Infant, b. 8c d. 1 13 1894. 

Moose, Infant daughter, Jacob O. & Eltha F. Moose, b. & d., 10 1 1905. 
Moose, Infant daughter of Lester and Nancy Hatley Moose, b. &: d. 

1 6 1958. 
Moose, Infant son of J. F. &: M. E. Moose, b. 12 2 1881; d. 1 25 1882. 
Moose, J. Forrest, b. xMay 28, 1909; d. Oct. 19, 1972. 
Moose, J. Wade, b. 9 8 1877; d. 5 24 1956. Married Agnes G. Fisher. 
Moose, James A., b. 2 19 1880; d. 1 19 1881. Son of John F. &: M. E. 

Moose. 
Moose, James Le^vis, Son of George & Elizabeth Moose, b. 2 17 1858: 

24 years, 8 months, 2 days. 
Moose, Jennie Hahn (Mrs. Floyd B.), b. July 25, 1902; d. June 19, 1973. 
Moose, Jane C., b. 1 8 1844; d. 9 10 1870. 26 years, 1 month, 18 days. 
Moose, Jason H., b. 8 4 1873; d. 5 30 1939. Wife Flora Penninger. 
Moose, Jerry Forrest, b. 10 12 1952; d. 10 15 1952. Son of Mr. & Mrs. J. 

Forrest Moose. 

Moose, John, b. 12 3 1796; d. 4 18 1877. 

Moose, John F., b. 1 31 1838; d. 1 19 1927. Married Mary E. Moose. 

Moose, John H., b. 1846; d. 1925. (Wife was Susan R. Artz) . 

Moose, Jonas N., b. 9 19 1869; d. 5 6 1951. 

Moose, Joseph Luther, b. 3 30 1899; d. 8 2 1899. Son of Luther H. & 
Eva F. Moose. 

Moose, Luther Carl, b. 12 7 1900; d. 10 5 1920. Son of Luther H. Sc Eva 
F. Moose. 

106 



Moose, Luther David, Infant son of Floyd B. & Jennie J. Moose, b. 

10 15 1929; d. 10 25 1929. 
Moose, Luther H., b. 11 14 1855; d. 12 14 1917; Wife Eva Frances 

Troutman, 
Moose, Margaret Barringer, b. 5 10 1802; d. 9 26 1843. Second wife of 

John Moose. 
Moose, Margaret Melchor, b. 7 14 1801; d. 3 30 1834. First wife of John 

Moose. 
Moose, Mary, b. 6 3 1794; d. 9 2 1859. Wife of Jacob Lyerly. 
Moose, Mary C, b. 10 11 1835; 3 20 1911. Daughter of Henry & Mary 

Eva Lingle Moose. 
Moose, Mary E., b. 2 26 1844; d. 1 31 1901. 
Moose, Mary L., 11 14 1876; d. 3 16 1965. Third wife of Jason H. 

Moose. 
Moose, Mary Lou, b. 5 18 1861; d. 1 29 1938. Wife of John Addison 

Peck. 
Moose, Mary Lucille, Infant daughter of A. Farrell & Tena Moose; 

b. 9 16 1907; d. 10 12 1908. 
Moose, Martha Lula, b. 9 9 1870; d. 9 10 1935. Wife of Malcolm G. 

Lentz. 
Moose, Mathias, b. 10 21 1806; d. 12 20 1848. 

Moose, Milla K., b. 11 16 1837; d. 6 23 1839. 1 year, 7 months, 7 days. 
Moose, Morgan Debery, Infant son of John F. and M. F. Moose, d. 

7 22 1869-9 mos. 27 days. 

Moose, Perry Earl, b. 8 8 1903; d. 4 1 1957. Son of J. Wade &: Agnes G. 
Moose, Married Willie Penninger. 

Moose, Ray P., b. 4 19 1897; d. 11 16 1966. Single. Son of Jason H. & 
Flora Penninger Moose. 

Moose, Roy H. F., b. 2 28 1892; d. 10 2 1892. Son of W. F. & L. B. 
Moose. 

Moose, Roy Lex, b 9 15 1903; d. 6 6 1904. Son of J. C. Sc L. C. Moose. 

Moose, Rufus A., 4 25 1860; d. 6 2 1930. Married Frances Fisher. 

Moose, Susan R., b. 1846; d. 1927. Wife of John H. Moose. 

Moose, Sophia, b. 8 26 1833; d. 11 12 1905. Wife of D. Monroe Moose. 

Moose, William F., b. 1 18 1866; d. 9 28 1927. Married Lora B. Fisher. 

Morgan, Mrs. Myrtle Penninger McDaniel, b. 11 10 1892; d. 8 13 1970. 
Wife of Thomas Morgan. 

Morgan, Thomas Rector, b. 7 12 1880; d. 10 7 1965. Md. Myrtle Pen- 
ninger McDaniel. 

Morton, Anna, b. 2 13 1878; d. 7 5 1952. Married Marcus Palmer. 

Palmer, Daniel W., b. 3 16 1858; d. 12 12 1941. Married Lovina Com- 

millo Fisher. 
Palmer, Girley, Infant son of D. W. &: L. C. Palmer, b. 6 23 1883; d. 

8 7 1883. 

107 



Palmer, Infant son of D. W. & L. C. Palmer, b. & d., 11 18 1892. 
Palmer, Marcus, b. 3 15 1872; d. 1 11 1938 Married Anna Morton. 
Palmer, Margaret, b. 8 30 1829; d. 7 11 1916. Wife of W. A. Palmer. 
Palmer, W. A., b .12 29 1822; d. 2 26 1902. Married Margaret Palmer. 
Peck, Ann E., b. 7 17 1834; d. 1 9 1912. Wife of Julius Peck. 
Peck, Anna Margaret, 4 30 1758; d. 11 12 1838. Wife of Mathias Earn- 
hardt. 
Peck, Bertha E., b. 3 27 1903; d. 4 29 1903. Daughter of John A. k Mary 

Peck. 
Peck, Calvin E., b. 5 31 1870; d. 1 2 1901. 
Peck, Dora E., b. 4 9 1878; d. 10 10 1897. Daughter of John A. & Mary 

Peck. 
Peck, Elizabeth, b. 11 28 1748; d. 3 19 1823. Wife of Frederick Peck. 
Peck, Frederick, b. 2 15 1734; d. 9 17 1830. Married to Elizabeth Bus- 

hardt. 
Peck, Hattie C, b. 8 2 1879; d. 7 14 1883. Daughter of J. L. &: N. M. 

Peck. 
Peck, Infant son of J. L. and N. M. Peck, b. & d. 2 18 1885. 
Peck, J. Lawson, b. 2 28 1842; d. 5 9 1908. 
Peck, Jannie R., b. 8 25 1882; d. 7 23 1883. Daughter of J. L. & N. M. 

Peck. 
Peck, John Addison, b. 11 1 1855; d. 1 28 1941. Married Mary Lou 

Moose. 
Peck, Julia C, b. 10 17 1867; d. 2 22 1941. Wife of J. Thomas Hartman. 
Peck, Lewis E., b. 4 1 1876; d. 1 21 1898. 

Peck, Maria Peck, b. 3 5 1804; d. 5 26 1893. Wife of George Moose. 
Peck, Nancy M., b. 8 26 1849; d. 6 25 191 1. Wife of J. Lawson Peck. 
Peeler, Shuford, Rev., D.D., b. 11 12 1875; d 1 31 1967. Married Bessie 

Moose. 
Penninger, Albert M., b. 4 25 1882; d. 6 1 1949. Married Lizzie M. 

Smith. 

Penninger, Flora, b. 9 25 1871; d. 1 11 1902. First wife of Jason H. 
Moose. 

Penninger, Frances J., b. 7 15 1867; d. 2 13 1939. Wife of Charles W. 
Blackwelder. 

Penninger, Homer C, b. 11 3 1902; d. 7 4 1930. Son of Martin L. Sc 
Minnie Penninger. 

Penninger, Jonas N., b. 9 19 1869; d. 5 6 1951. (Wife was Alice Henri- 
etta Moose). 

Penninger, Lizzie M., Smith, b. 5 26 1885; d. 1 16 1955. (Wife of Albert 
M. Penninger.) 

Penninger, Martin L., b. 1 22 1874; d. 9 1 1943. Married Minnie Hahn. 

Penninger, Mary E., 12 19 1841; d. 3 19 1919. Wif^ of Matthias Pen- 
ninger. 

108 



Penninger, Matthias, b. 8 27 1837; d. 2 10 1935. Married to Mary E. 

Penninger, Minnie Hahn, b. 6 22 1877; d. 12 6 1960. 

Penninger, Pearl L., b. 1 7 1906; d. 3 22 1931. Wife of Gerry J. Lyerly. 

Penninger, Willie B., b. 8 25 1900; d. 9 24 1961. Wife of Perry Earl 
Moose. 

Platte, Mrs. Ralph (nee Edith Penninger). b. 12 25 1916; d. 1 13 1969. 
Age 52. 

Plyer, Mary E., b. 11 23 1886; d. 2 4 1913. 

Plyler, Martha E., b. 6 11 1865; d. 2 25 1894. Wife of R. D. Plyler. 

Plyler, Mary E., b. 11 23 1886; d. 2 4 1913. 

Ridenhour, Charles T., d. 1 26 1858. 18 yrs., 11 mos., 14 days. Son of 
P. Sc E. Ridenhour. 

Ridenhour, Elizabeth, b. 2 28 1779; d. 6 19 1872. Wife of John Riden- 
hour. 

Ridenhour, George T. B., d. 10 13 1862; 4 months, 3 days. Son of D. E. 
& Sarah Ridenhour. 

Ridenhour, Elmira, nee Amelia E. Moose, b. 8 31 1832; d. 7 8 1888. 

Ridenhour, John, b. 4 26 1777; d. 11 22 1865. Married Elizabeth Riden- 
hour. 

Ridenhour, John E., d. 2 2 1864, 1 mo. 22 da., son of D. E. &: Sarah 
Ridenhour. 

Ridenhour, Julien A., d. 4 2 1858, 1 y., 6 da.. Son of D. E. & Sarah 
Ridenhour. 

R G L, 1845. 

Rinehardt, Titus M., b. 9 2 1878; d. 8 7 1961. Married Julia Anne Shoe. 

Rogers, Dona Agnes, b. 1884; d. 1955. (Wife of John Archie 

Rowland.) 

Rowland, Annie B., b. 1 20 1910; d. 1 16 1931. 

Rowland, Archie E., b. 1925; d. 12 14 1970. Age 45. 

Rowland, Billy Ray, b. 5 31 1933; d. 9 2 1957. 

Rowland, Carl R., b. Dec. 12, 1902; d. Dec. 28, 1972. 

Rowland, Effie Rose, b. 4 18 1892; d. 8 17 1922. Wife of J. T. Allman. 

Rowland, Harley W., b. 10 17 1904; d. 7 31 1927. 

Rowland, Jane, b. 3 23 1825; d. 11 14 1878. 2nd. Wife of Daniel Lefler. 

Rowland, John Archie, b. 1880; d. 1961. (Wife Dona Agnes 

Rogers.) 

Rowland, John R., b. 2 27 1864; d. 2 16 1938. 

Rowland, Martha Ellen Peck, b. 1 13 1859; d. 11 12 1938. 

Rowland, Martin L., b. 11 5 1900; d. 5 4 1951. 

Rowland, Mary, b. d. 9 4 1966. 

Rowland, Mary A., Miss, b. 7 30 1895; d. 9 4 1966. 71 y, 1 m, 4 days. 

Rowland, Melvin Davis, b. 7 30 1927; d. 6 25 1928. 

109 



Rowland, Ore E., b. 4 23 1907; d. 6 10 1932. 
Rowland, Sarah E., b. 9 17 1871; d. 1 2 1934. 
Rowland, Walter Hugh, b. d., 2 8 1962. 56 years. 

Safrit, Mary, b. 1901; Second wife of Ralph D. Fisher. 

Shoe, Alexander, b. 1883; d. 1923. Wife Sarah Shoe. 

Shoe, Catherine, b. 11 24 1779; d. 9 29 1862. AVife of Henry Shoe. 

Shoe, Catherine Sides, b. 8 9 1848; d. 11 13 1939. 

Shoe, Daniel Albert, b. 2 18 1866; d. 6 12 1922. Married Alice Moose. 

Shoe, Dora Barrier, b. 1 20 1895; d. 2 6 1965. 

Shoe, Edmon Monroe, b. 12 4 1830; d. 6 23 1904. 

Shoe, Frank Guy, b. 3 6 1888; d. 12 3 1891. Son of Daniel A. & Alice 
M. Shoe. 

Shoe, Fred S., Cpl. b. 5 10 1908; d. 5 31 1944. Italy W W II. 

Shoe, Gurley D., b. 9 18 1886; d. 2 10 1928. Married Flora Furr. 

Shoe, Henry, b. 6 12 1870; d. 5 22 1860. Wife Catharine Shoe. 

Shoe, Isaac, b. 4 22 1838; d. 9 18 1922. C. S. A. (Wife was Serene Shoe.) 

Shoe, Jennie, b. 1 14 1883; d. 8 25 1964. "Wife of Henry Thomas Allman. 

Shoe, Jessie Theodore, b. 9 1 1910; d. 7 7 1911. Son of Gurley D. and 
Flora E. Shoe. 

Shoe, John W., b. 5 11 1878; d. 5 5 1929. 

Shoe, Julia Ann, b. 3 13 1875; d. 12 10 1957. (Wife of Titus M. Rhine- 
hart.) 

Shoe, L. Haynes, b. 2 11 1875; d. 8 7 1935. 2nd. Wife, Sarah E. Shoe; 
1st Wife, Lizzie N. Josephine Shoe. 

Shoe, Lillie, b. 4 17 1886. (Wife of Daniel Lewis Lowder.) 

Shoe, Lizzie N. Josephine, b. 10 13 1875; d. 6 12 1911. 1st. Wife L. 
Haynes Shoe. 

Shoe, Margaret, b. d. 10 12 1853. 44 yrs. 9 mos., 29 days. Wife of 

Jacob. 

Shoe, Margaret Julia H., b. 12 8 1873; d. 1 6 1958. 

Shoe, Martin, b. d. 11 18 1889. Married Louise Jane Gullit. 

Shoe, Sarah, b. 1833; d. 1883. ^Vife of Alexander Shoe. 

Shoe, Sarah E., b. 11 17 1878; d. 5 19 1927. 2nd wife of L. Haynes Shoe. 

Shoe, Serene, b. 10 13 1836; d. 12 9 1910. AVife of Isaac Shoe. 

Shoe, William R., b. 10 16 1877; d. 8 31 1962. 

Shoe, Zellie, b. 4 17 1886; Wife of Daniel Lewis Lowder. 

Shue, Agnes Myrtle, b. 12 28 1912; d. 10 20 1929. Daughter of John W. 
& Effie Shue. 

Sides, Annie J., b. 8 5 1881; d. 1 1 14 1964. W^ife of Andrew J. Harwood. 
Sides, Charley, b. 1 5 1818; d. 11 21 1881. 
Sides, Daisy E., b. 2 25 1884; d. 3 18 1884. 
Sides, David P., b. 3 10 1868; d. 12 24 1934. 

110 



Sides, Dewey R., b. 5 27 1901; d. 2 20 1972. 

Sides, Elizabeth, b. 11 16 1798; d. 9 7 1830. Wife of Matthias Sides. 

Sides, Eugene Yow, b. Oct. 29, 1930; d. Jan. 11, 1974. 

Sides, Green H., b. 7 11 1845; d. 10 9 1931. C. S. A. 

Sides, J. W., b. 2 25 1850; d. 2 17 1906. Married to Rebecca H. 

Sides, John Albert, b. 11 5 1886; d. 2 2 1912. 

Sides, Lora B., b. 9 12 1895; d. 5 11 1896. 

Sides, L. Cook, b. 4 28 1873; d. 10 28 1965. 

Sides, Martha E., b. 12 14 1876; d. 4 11 1877. 

Sides, Rebecca H., b. 2 2 1851; d. 9 13 1925. Wife of J. W. Sides. 

Sides, Susann, b. 2 10 1837; d. 9 6 1915. 

Sides, Travis M., b. 10 31 1881; d. 2 10 1896. 

Sides, Willie L., b. 7 17 1896; d. 11 21 1932. 

Smith, Betty S., b. 1 8 1933; Wife of Carl F. Smith. 

Smith, Carl F., b. 1 5 1931; d. 8 3 1966. Married to Betty S. 

Smith, Lizzie M., b. 5 26 1885; d. 1 16 1955. Wife of Albert M. Pen- 

ninger. 
Stires, Leah, b. 4 22 1816; d. 3 12 1841. 

Troutman, Eva Frances, b. 8 1 1859; d. 9 16 1940. Wife of Luther H. 

Moose. 
Troutman, John, b. 4 5 1806 d. 4 26 1857. Wife was Sarah Troutman. 
Troutman, Sarah, b. 1 13, 1804; d. 11 13 1879. Wife of John Troutman. 
Tucker, Fleta, b. 9 28 1924; d. 4 21 1927. Daughter of S. T. & Mary Lee 

Tucker. (Ileta?) 

Wagner, Freda Mabel, b. 10 9 1886; d. 10 14 1939. Wife of Horace F. 

Barrier. 
Wagoner, John Heller, b. 5 18 1886; d. 2 28 1887. Son of W. S. 8c M. J. 

Wagoner. 
Whitley, Clarence, b. 8 14 1902; d. 1 30 1967. Married (1) Mary Kath- 

erine Hartman Whitley, (2) Ruth Laton Hinson. 
Whitley, Mary Katherine, b. &: d. 4 20 1952. Daughter of Mr. &: Mrs. 

H. C. Whitley, Jr. 
Wolf, Tobia, d. 3 19 1832. 21 years, 3 months, 15 days. 



Ill 



LAND HOLDERS ALONG DUTCH BUFFALO 
CREEK PRIOR TO 1800 



Copied from the record of deeds issued in the Office of the Register of 
Deeds, iMecklenburg County, Charlotte, N. C. 



7 16 1770 Paul Barringer & wife 

Book 4, p 636 to Nicholas Kress 

7 16 1770 Paul Barringer Sc wife 

Book 4, p 637 to Nicholas Kress 

1 1 1790 State Grant 
Book 13, p 359 to Nicholas Kress 

Oct. 1767 Martha &: Thomas AVright 

Book 4, p 177 to David Adams 

5 5 1768 Martha &: Thomas Wright 
Book 4, p 176 to David Adams 

2 9 1771 Abner Nash 
Book 6, p 13 to Adam Alexander 

April 1780 George S: Catherine Goodnight 

Book 11, p 10 to Leonard Barbrick 

2 10 1765 Arthur Dobbs 

Book 2, p 598 to Christian Barnhardt 

11 2 1784 Alex Martin 
Book 12, p 191 to Christian Barnhardt 

12 1786 James Ross 
Book 13, p 53 to ^Villiam Barns 

12 22 1763 Arthur Dobbs 

Book 1, p 617 to Paul Barringer 

6 25 1764 Arthur Dobbs 
Book 2, p 17 to Matthias Barringer 

7 24 1764 Ann &: John Young 
Book 1, p 503 to Paul Barringer 

7 25 1764 Ann &: John Young 

Book 1, p 505 to Paul Barringer 

11 18 1768 Arthur Dobbs 

Book 2, p 581 to Paul Barringer 

Jan. 1768 Klera & Charles Hart 

Book 3, p 25 to Matthias Barringer 

July, 1772 John & Elizabeth Mitchell 

Book 5, p 343 to Geo. Barringer 

July, 1772 Leonard Sc Esther Hartsel 

Book 6, p 148 to Paul Barringer 



171 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 

123 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 

128 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 

134 acres 

on Bear Creek 

130 acres 

on Bear Creek 

117 acres 

on Bear Creek 

100 acres 

on Cold AVater Creek 

198 acres 

on Cold ^Vater 

45 acres 

on Cold Water 

100 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 

119 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 

130 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 

170 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 

170 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 

123 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 

250 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 

175 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 

182 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 



112 



8 18 1774 John & Catherine Lance 
to Paul Barringer 

5 22 1767 Benj Shaw 

to Francis Beaty 

July, 1767 James Kelly 

to Francis Beaty 

8 7 1787 State 

Book 13, p 287 to John Berger 

3 2 1764 Arthur Dobbs 

Book 1, p 280 to Andrew Binghurt 

July, 1774 Jacob Swink 

Book 10, p 106 to Peter Boger 

10 9 1783 State 

Book 12, p 670 to Jacob Boger 

July 1788 Christian Goodman 

Book 13, p 509 to Daniel Boger 

July 1788 George Graham, Sheriff 

Book 13, p 516 to Daniel Boger 

July 1788 George Graham, Sheriff 

Book 13, p 313 to Peter Boger 

July 1771 John & Elizabeth Mitchell 

Book 5, p 341 to John Gulp 

July 1787 George &: Molly Barringer 

Book 12, p 375 to John Gulp 

8 7 1787 State 

to John Gulp 

10 22 1782 State 

Book 12, p 675 to Jacob Fagot 

11 2 1784 State 

Book 12, p 146 to Jacob Fagot 

July 1789 Jacob Fisher, Sr. 

Book 13, p 676 to George Fisher 

July 1791 Jacob Fisher, Sr. 

Book 13, p 920 to Jacob Fisher, Jr. 

11 12 1778 Gallaugher, Hugh 

Book 9, p 294 to Richard & Elizabeth Perry 

8 7 1787 St. of N. C. & R'd. Caswell 

Book 13, p 344 to Leonard Garner State Grant 

11 2 1784 St. of N. C. & Alex' Martin 

to Leonard Garven State Grant 

7 14 1756 Jean McWhorter 

Book 1, p 453 to Joseph Gillespie 



106 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 

400 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 

200 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 

200 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 

159 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 

122 acres 

on Shena Wolf Creek 

287 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 

141 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 

200 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 

38 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 

25 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 

100 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 

235 acres 

on Buffalo Creek 

98 acres at Bost 
Meeting House 

296 acres 

at Adams Creek 

1501/2 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

891/2 acres 
Buffalo Creek 

200 acres Little Cold 
Water Creek 

260 acres #712 
Dutch Buffalo Creek 

200 acres #425 
Buffelow Cr 

430 acres 
Anson County 



113 



9 15 1756 Jean McWhorter 
Book 1, p 454 to Joseph Gillespie 

4 14 1759 Edward Boyd (Boyl) 

Book 2, p 206 to Thomas Gillespie 

4 16 1759 Edward Boyd (Boyl) 

Book 2, p 207 to Thomas Gillespie 

8 25 1766 John &: Catherine Lippart 

Book 1, p 287 (Lippard) to Abraham Glimph 

6 25 1764 Arthur & Justina Dobbs 

Book 2, p 678 to Henry Goldman 

Oct. 1770 Jno. k Elizabeth Brandon 

Book 5, p 203 to Michael Goodman 

Oct. 1770 Jno. Sc Elizabeth Brandon 

Book 5, p 201 to Michael Goodman 

July 1774 Mary & Coonrod Garelough 

Book 6, p 356 to Christopher Goodman 

July 1778 Samuel Suther 

Book 10, p 26 to Christian Goodman 

10 22 1782 St. of N. C. & Alex' Martin to 
Book 12, p 638 Christian Goodman State Grant 

10 9 1783 State of N. C. & Alex' Martin 
Book 12, p 649 to George Goodman 

April 1784 Margaret & John Michael 

Book 12, p 293 Clonts to Christian Goodman 

July, 1784 Margaret Sc George Cagle 

Book 12, p 373 to Michael Goodman 

July 1784 Stophel and Catron Goodman 

Book 12, p 346 (Godman) to Jacob Goodman 

11 2 1784 St. of N. C. &: Alex' Martin 
Book 12, p 165 to Christopher Goodman 

11 2 1784 St. of N. C. & Alex' Martin 

Book 12, p 161 to Christian Goodman 

8 7 1787 St. of N. C. & R'd. Caswell 

Book 13, p 246 to Christopal Goodman 

8 7 1787 St. of N. C. & R'd. Caswell 

Book 13, p 247 to George Goodman 

July 1789 Christosel Gootman 

Book 13, p 662 (Christopher Goodman) 
to Michael Goodman 



430 acres 
Anson County 

300 acres 
Anson County, 
Humphries Creek 

301 acres 
Anson County, 
Humphries Creek 

40 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

101 acres 

Little Cold Water & 

Rocky River 

380 acres Adkin 
River, Buffalo Creek 

580 acres Adkin 
River, Buffalo Creek 

100 acres 
Dutch Buffalo & 
Rocky River 

125 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Cr. 

191 acres 

Dutch Bufalo Creek 

150 acres, #286 
Dutch Buffalo Creek 

200 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

& Rocky River 

200 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Cr. 

200 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

149 acres #449 
Dutch Buffalo Creek 

250 acres #479 
Dutch Buffalo Creek 

300 acres #568 
Dutch Buffalo Creek 

124 acres #569 
Dutch Buffalo Creek 

300 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 



114 



July 1830 
Book 13, p 664 

10 9 1783 
Book 12, p 190 

8 7 1787 
Book 13, p 345 

Apr. 1771 
Book 5, p 295 

6 24 1762 
Book 1, page 9 

10 5 1765 
Book 2, p 288 

Jan. 1788 
Book 13, p 419 

10 9 1783 
Book 12, p94 

2 10 1765 
Book 2, p 770 

11 2 1782 
Book 12, p 643 

Mar. 1786 
Book 12, p 582 

10 16 1795 
Book 15, p 99 

1 11 1796 
Book 12, p 116 

Jan. 1797 
Book 15, p 252 

4 25 1800 
Book 17, p 391 

Apr. 1769 
Book 4, p 509 

6 12 1762 
Book 1, p 1 

Jan. 1763 
Book 8, p 78 

3 22 1786 
Book 13, p 540 

Apr. 1776 
Book 7, p 74 



Stophel (Stuffell) Goodman 
to Michael Goodman 

St. of N. C. &: Alex' Martin 
to Christian Goodnite 

St. of N. C. and R'd. Caswell 
to Henry Goodnight 

John fe Elizabeth Mitchell 
to Fight Goodnight 

Arthur Dobbs 
to James Graham 

John Stinson 
to Joseph Green 

Michael & Elizabeth Christman 
to Andrew Gruse (Cruse) 

St. of N. C, Gov. Alex' Martin 
to Joshua Hadley State Grant 

Arthur &: Justina Dobbs 
to John Hegler 

St. of N. C. k Alex' Martin 
to John Hagler 

Francy and Paulsen Ness 
to John Hagler 

Andw. Alexander (Shff) 
to John Hagler 

Allen Freeman 
to John Hagler 

Allen Freeman 
to John Hagler 

John Hagler 
to Peter Hagler 

Matthias & Market Barringer 
to Martin Harky 

Frances & Robert Harris, Sr. 
to Robert Harris, Jr. 

Martin &: Robert Harris, Jr. 
to Robert Harris, Sr. 

Peter & Flora Lance 

to Ephraim Drake Harris 

Rebecca & John Fransichi 
to George Herron 



130 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

212 acres #313 
Cold Water Creek 

39 Vi acres 
Buffalo Creek 

144 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

278 acres Anson 
County, Great Cold 
Water Creek 

130 acres Broad 
River, Buffalo Creek 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 
2231/2 acres 

350 acres #327 
Buffalo Creek 

255 acres Rocky River 
& Dutch Buffalo Creek 

100 acres #527 
Rocky River 

5 acres 
Rocky River 

30 acres 
Goose Creek 

100 acres 
Clear Creek 

131 V2 acres Clear 
Creek & Rocky River 

98 acres Clear Creek' 

6 Rocky River 

130 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

185 acres 
Anson County 
Dutch Buffalo Creek 

185 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

160 acres 

Little Bear Creek 

280 acres 

Little Bear Creek 



115 



8 7 1787 St. of N. C, Gov R'd. Caswell 

Book 13, p 236 to David Hart State Grant 

6 25 1764 Arthur & Justina Dobbs 

Book 2, p 652 to Leonard Hartsil 

6 25 1764 Arthur & Justina Dobbs 

Book 2, p 586 to William Hays 

Oct. 1791 Jarie &: James Russell, Sr. 

Book 14, p 13 to Patrick Hays 

11 2 1784 St. of N. C., Gov. Alex' Martin 

Book 12, p 196 to Ferderick Herlock 

1 1 2 1784 St. of N. C., Gov. Alex' Martin 

Book 12, p 687 to Elish Hern State Grant 

II 2 1784 St. of N. C., Gov. Alex' Martin 

Book 12, p 691 to Elish Hern State Grant 

11 2 1784 St. of N. C., Gov. Alex' Martin 

Book 12, p 692 to Elish Hern State Grant 

11 2 1784 St. of N. C., Gov. Alex' Martin 

Book 12, p 693 to Elish Hern State Grant 

11 2 1784 St. of N. C., Gov. Alex' Martin 

Book 12, p 694 to Elish Hern State Grant 

11 2 1784 St. of N. C, Gov. Alex' Martin 

Book 1 2, p 695 to Elish Hern State Grant 

8 7 1787 St. of N. C, Gov. R'd. Caswell 

Book 13, p 347 to Jesse Hein (Hun) State Grant 

8 7 1787 State of N. C, Gov. R'd. 

Book 13, p 350 Caswell to ^Vm (^Villiam) 
Hern (Hen, Hun) 

1768 Jacob &: Margaret Moyart 

Book 3, p 166 (Moyar) to George Hice 

8 7 1787 State of N. C, Gov. R'd. 

Book 13, p 346 Caswell to Conrad Hice 

Oct. 1777 Margaret &: Martin Phifer, Sr. 

Book 7, p 326 to John Holbrook 

10 22 1782 St. of N. C, Gov. Alex' Martin 

Book 12, p 689 to John Holebrook 

July 1792 Absolem &: Marv Baker 

Book 14, p 97 to Christian Halle 

8 7 1787 St. of N. C, Gov. Richard 

Book 13, p 300 Caswell to Jacob Hover 



45 acres #659 (655?) 
Cold Water Creek 

182 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

265 acres 
Buffalo Creek 

153 acres 
Buffalo Creek 

200 acres 
(Back Branch) 
Coldwater Creek 

100 acres #471 
Bear Creek 

200 acres #379 
Bear Creek (Bare) 

100 acres #367 
Little Bare Creek 

#381 

Little Bare Creek 

200 acres #380 
Bear Creek 

52 acres #482 
Bare Creek 

100 acres #607 
Bare Creek 

100 acres #596 
Little Bare Creek 

140 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

30 acres #566 #646 
Deed book E. side 
Dutch Buffalo Creek 

201 acres Buffalo & 
Cold Water Crks. 

50 acres #216 
Cold Water Creek 
(Long Branch) 

200 acres 
Buffalow Creek 

100 acres #613 
Dutch Buffalo Creek 



116 



6 25 1764 
Book 2, p 596 



Arthur &: Justina Dobbs 
to Mark House 



96 acres Between 
Adams and Dutch 
Buffalo Creek 



10 22 1782 St. of N. C. &: Gov. Alex' Martin 98 acres #189 Near 

Book 12, p 675 DUTCH BUFFALOW John Bost Meeting 

MEETING HOUSE House Road 

State Grant 



8 7 1787 
Book 13, p 346 



6 25 1764 
Book 2, p 693 

7 20 1767 
Book 4, p 298 

8 7 1787 
Book 12, p 713 

(1 17) 7 1767 
Book 4, p 287 

3 2 1764 
Book 2, p 350 

Oct. 1769 



10 22 1782 
Book 12, p36 

8 7 1787 
Book 13, p 356 

April 1775 

July 1770 
Book 4, p 636 

7 16 1770 
Book 4, p 367 

1 1 1790 
Book 13, p 359 

July 1775 
Book 7, p 44 

8 7 1787 
Book 13, p 245 

8 7 1787 
Book 13, p 264 



State of N. C, Gov. R'd. 
Caswell Conrad Hice State 
Grant E. Side Buffaloe Creek 

Arthur &: Justina Dobbs 
to John Hughes 

Moses Moore 
to Hugh Irvin 

St. of N. C. & R'd Caswell 
to David (Daniel?) Jaret 

John Bowers 

to Samuel Johnson 

Arthur & Justina Dobbs 
to Peter Keiler (Kiley) 

Leonard &: Anna Catherine 

Star(r)ing 

Peter Kaler (Kaler, Peter) 

St. of N. C. Gov. Alex' Martin 
ct al to James Kile 

St. of N. C. and R'd Caswell, 
Gov., to James Kile 

Ann & Jacob Rook or Hook 
to Jacob Kline 

Paul &: Aulis Barringer 
to Nicholas Kress 

Paul Sc Aulis Barringer 
to Nicholas Kress 



N. C. State Grant, Gov. R'd. 
Caswell to Nicholas Kress 

Barnet & Catron Miller 
to George Lagle 

St. of N. C, Gov. R'd. Caswell 

to Conrad Lingle State GrantDutch Buffalo Creek 

N. C. State Grant, R'd. Caswell 100 acres #601 
to Jasper Lingle Buffalo Creek 



50 acres #646 
(30 acres (Deed B) 
Cold Water Creek 
(Deed Book) 

123 acres Between 
English Buffalo &: 
Coddle Creek 

400 acres 
Buffalo Creek 

342 acres #560 
Dutch Buffalo Creek 

150 acres 
Dutchman's Creek 

166 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

136 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

200 acres #275 
English Buffalo Creek 

21 acres #590 
Buffalo Creek 

288 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

171 acres 
Buffalo Creek 

123 acres 
Buffalo Creek 

128 acres #687 
Dutch Buffalo Creek 

200 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

134 acres #567 



117 



Jan. 1789 
Book 13, p 604 
Jan. 1789 
Book 13, p 586 

8 7 1787 
Book 13, p 358 

6 25 1764 
Book 1, p 182 

7 17 1765 
Book 2, p 307 

Oct. 1777 
Book 7, p 330 
11 5 1777 
Book 12, p 252 

11 5 1777 
Book 12, p 150 
10 9 1783 
Book 12, p 115 
Oct. 1790 
Book 13, p 829 
3 12 1794 
Book 14, p 426 
Sept. 1786 
Book 13, p 14 

6 25 1764 
Book 2, p 360 

8 6 1767 
Book 10, p 375 

10 10 1770 
Book 13, p 862 

10 10 1791 
Book 13, p 862 

Oct. 1771 
Book 14, p 14 

1786 

Book 13, p 1 

7 10 1788 
Book 13, p 270 



John Aleleker 

to Jacob Lingle 

Daniel Boger 

to Jacob Lingle 

N. C. State Grant, R'd. Caswell, 

Gov. to Henry Lenger 

Arthur & Justina Dobbs 

to John Lince 

Benjamin Shaw 

to Daniel Lazerby, Lisenby, 

Lissenbee? 

Micle (Michel) Shaver 

to Frances Lock 

Griffith Retherford 

(Rutherford?) 

to Blench (Blanch) Lock 

Matthew Lock 

to Francies (sis?) Lock 

N. C. State Grant, Gov. Sam'l 

Johnston to Francis Lock 

James McDowell 

to Frances Lock 

Matthew Lock 

to Francks Lock 

Christiana Beard (John Lewis) 

to Henry Luding 

Arthur &: Justina Dobbs 
to Godfrey Lipe 

Rebekah &: Robert McClelan 
to Charles McCammon 

Joseph Rodgers, (Exr); 
Archibald Huston (Exr), 
to James McDowell 

David McDowell, Andrew 
Shields, (Exr) to John McDowel 

Patrick Sc Rachel Hays 
to John McKinley 

William &: Frances Hayes 
to Alexander ? McLarty, Jr. 

St. of N. C, Gov. Sam'l 
Joynston to Archibald 
McClerty (McClarty?) 



125 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

141 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 
50 acres #580 
Dutch Buffalo Creek 
106 acres 

Mecklenburg County 
Dutch Buffalo Creek 
200 acres 
Buffalo Creek 

144 acres 

Buffalo Creek 

190 acres Buffelow & 

Coddle Creeks 

144 acres 
Buffelow Creek 

199 acres #316 
Buffelow Creek 
177 acres Little 
Buffelow Branch 
33 acres 
Buffalow Creek 

142 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

136 acres Rocky River 
& Dutch Buffelow 

77 acres Between 
Coddle Sc English 
Buffalo Creek 

200 acres (Robert 
McDaniel est) 
Little Buffalo Creek 

200 acres (Robert 
1 McDaniel est) 
Little Buffalo Creek 

153 acres 
Buffalo Creek 

165 acres 
Buffalo Creek 

150 acres #762 
Buffalow Creek 



118 



8 7 1787 St. of N. C, R'd. Caswell 

Book 17, p 289 to James McMiren 
(Misen, Micen?) 

10 9 1783 St. of N. C. & Gov. Alex' 
Book 10, p 652 Martin to George Masten 

11 24 1762 William Powell Sc Arthur 
Book 1, p 95 Dobbs to Henry Matinger 

April 1787 Robert & Katharine Archibald 

Book 13, p 102 to John Mearn (Meam?) 

July 1788 George Graham, (Shff) 

Book 3, p 526 Christian Goodman (est) 
to John Welker 

July 1791 George Grahan, (Shff) 

Book 13, p 529 Christian Goodman (Est) 
to John Welker 

April, 1791 Peter & Elizabeth Beaver 

Book 13, p 878 to John Meliker 

Oct. 1770 Suffy or Tuffy & 

Book 5, p 158 Henry Fund Pistenbustill 
to John Barnet Miller 

8 7 1787 St. of N. C. &: R'd. Caswell 

Book 13, p 261 to Jacob Miller State Grant 

8 7 1787 St. of N. C. and R'd. Caswell 

Book 13, p 332 to William Miller 

Jan. 1778 Eve & Peter Delph to Jacob 

Book 10, p 240 Misonheimer (Misenheimer?) 

10 9 1783 St. of N. C. &: Alex' Martin 
Book 12, p 147 to John Misenimer 

8 7 1787 St. of N. C. & R'd. Caswell 

Book 13, p 249 to John Misenhimer 

1 1 2 1784 St. of N. C. & Alex' Martin 
Book 10, p 180 to Adam Moyars State Grant 

1 1 2 1784 St. of N. C. & Alex' Martin 

Book 12, p 160 to Anthony Musionmunk 

July 1789 George Graham (Shff) & 

Book 13, p 692 Anthony Muskenunk to 

Jacob Mukemunk (Mooskenunk) 

6 25 1764 Arthur & Justina Dobbs 

Book 2, p 21 to Jacob Myers 

Oct. 1774 Frances Robt. Harris 

Book 10, p 149 to Jacob Myer 



100 acres #565 Dutch 
Buffalow Creek 

258 acres #329 
Buffalo Creek 

224 acres 
Anson County 
Dutch Buffalo Creek 

99 acres Coddle &: 
Buffalo Creeks 

250 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

125 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

178 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

364 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

251 acres #628 
Buffalo Creek 

286 acres #718 
Buffalo Creek 

150 acres 
Buffalow Creek 

200 acres #332 Dutch 
Buffalow Creek 

79 acres #705 
Dutch Buffalo Creek 

300 acres #506 Dutch 
Buffalow Creek 

200 acres #455 Dutch 
Buffalow Creek 

200 acres Dutch 
Buffalow Creek 

142 acres Dutch 
Buffalow Creek 

183 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 



119 



3 12 1779 
Book 10, p 409 

11 2 1762 
Book l,p29 



2 10 1765 
Book 2, p 685 

11 2 1784 
Book 12, p 636 

Oct. 1769 
Book 4, p 578 

10 7 1769 
Book 7, p 269 



Jan. 1777 
Book ll,p34 

1- 9 1783 
Book 13, p 365 

11 2 1784 
Book 12, p 699 

11 2 1784 
Book 13, p 368 

8 7 1787 
Book 12, p 712 

Oct. 1784 
Book 12, p 389 

8 7 1787 
Book 12, p 715 

6 25 1764 
Book 2, p 703 

3 2 1764 
Book l,p280 

3 2 1764 
Book 2, p 467 

6 24 1762 
Book 1, p 88 

2- 10 1765 
Book 2, p 654 



Jacob Myer 
to Bolton Neas 

(Arthur Dobbs) Will'm Powell 
to Christian Ovenshine (chine?) 



Arthur &: Justina Dobbs 
to Samuel Patton (Paton) 

St. of N. C. and Gov. Alex' 
Martin to Walter Farr 

John &: Marg't Penny 
to Martin Phifer (Fifer) 

John McGinty et al 
to Martin (Maj) Fifer 



185 acres 
Rocky River & 
Dutch Buffalo Creek 

180 acres Dutch 
Buffalo Creek & 
Little Cold Water 
Creek 

292 acres Buffalo and 
Coddle Creeks 

250 acres #511 
Buffalow Creek 

150 acres 
Buffalo Creek 



Tried to get 30 
pounds yr. from 
legislature to pay 
preacher or reader. 

John McCoy (Mortgage Deed) 225 acres 

to Martin Phifer, Sr. Buffalo Creek 

St. of N. C. & Gov. Alex' Martin 200 acres #273 
to Martin Phifer, Jr. Buffalo Creek 

St. of N. C. & Gov. Alex' Martin 150 acres #384 
to Martin Phifer Buffalo Creek 

St. of N. C. & Gov. Alex' Martin 246 acres #383 
to Caleb Phifer Buffalo Creek 

St. of N. C. & Gov. R'd. Caswell 345 acres #622 
to Martin Phifer Buffalo Creek 



Jacob Agner (est.) Shff. Deed 
to Thomas Polk 

St. of N. C. and Gov. R'd. 
Caswell to David Purviance 

Justina Sc Arthur Dobbs 
to Jacob Richey 

Arthur &: Justina Dobbs 
to Andrew Rignhart 

Arthur &: Justina Dobbs 
to Andrew Rynhart 

Arthur Dobbs 
to Robert Rogers 

Arthur &: Justina Dobbs 
to John Rodgers 



262 acres plus 
Dutch Buffalo Creek 

125 acres #603 
Buffalow Creek 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 
Rocky River 

159 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

159 acres Adams &: 
Dutch Buffaulow 
Creek 

138 acres Anson 
County Buffalo 
& Coddle Creeks 

281 acres Coddle 
&: Buffalo Creek 



120 



8 7 1787 St. of N. C. &: R'd. Caswell 

Book 13, p 336 to John Rodgers 

Apr. 1789 Joseph Rodgers 

Book 13, p 649 ro Moses Rodgers 

8 7 1787 St. of N. C. Sc Richard Caswell 

Book 13, p 305 to John Smith 

July 1775 Angles & Paul Barringer 

Book 7, p 24 to Henry Sosomonhouse 

11 2 1784 St. of N. C. & Alex' Martin 

Book 12, p 128 to Henry Soceman (Seaceman) 

Jan. 1768 Barbara & Godfrey Lipe 

Book 3, p 29 to Lennard Starnes 

11 2 1784 St. of N. C. and Alex' Martin 

Book 12, p 656 to George Steakleather 

July 1791 Jacob Sc Catherine Kline 

Book 14, p 6 to John Stagenwelt 

8 7 1787 St. of N. C. & R'd. Caswell 

Book 13, p 225 to Adam Sterwalt (Stirewalt) 

11 2 1784 St. of N. C. &: Alex' Martin 

Book 12, p 133 to Andrew Stouth 

Oct. 1771 Michaeal Christman Lease 

Book 5, p 205 to (Rev.) Samuel Suther 

Oct. 1771 Michael & Elizabeth Christman 

Book 5, p 207 to Samuel Suther 

8 7 1787 St. of N. C. &: Richard Caswell 

Book 13, p 306 Samuel Suther 

Oct. 1782 Mathias Beaver 

Book 1 1, p 162 to Jacob Teem et al 

7 9 1765 Charles (Whitner) Whittiar 
Book 2, p 185 (sar) to Robert Humphries 

8 7 1787 St. of N. C. & Gov. R'd. Caswell 
Book 13, p 354 to James Walkter 

Oct. 1770 Jacob & Cathrine Richey 

Book 5, p 153 to Adam Walcher (Walser, 

Wolche) 

10 9 1783 St. of N. C. & Alex' Martin 

Book 12, p 655 to Adam Walcher 

Apr. 1792 Paul Barringer et al 

Book 14, p 49 to Michael Weaver 



1 tract #617 
Buffalo Creek 

217 acres 3 mile 
Branch Buffalo Creek 

200 acres #716 
Buffaloe Creek 

182 acres Dutch 
Buffalow Creek 

622 acres #533 Dutch 
Buffalow Creek 

136 acres Dutch 
Buffalo Creek & 
Rocky River 

250 acres #541 
Dutch Buffalow 
Wolf Creeks 

55 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

140 acres Lick Branch 
at Dutch Buffalo 
Creek 

150 acres #409 
Buffalow Creek 

125 acres Dutch 
Buffalow Creek 

125 acres Dutch 
Buffalow Creek 

138 acres #620 
Cold Water Creek 

146 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

333 acres 
Buffalow Creek 

150 acres #693 
Buffalow & 
Coddle Creeks 

100 acres Dutch 
Buffalow Creek 

914 acres #276 Dutch 
Buffelow Creek 

109 acres 
Buffalo Creek 



121 



Apr. 1792 Paul Barringer 

Book 14, p 48 to Michael Weaver 

10 9 1783 St. of N. C. and Alex' iMartin 
Book 13, p 195 to John White 

11 2 1784 St. of N. C. & Alex' Martin 
Book 13, p 196 to John (Sr.) White 

Apr. 1789 Joseph Rodgers 

Book 13, p 652 to John Rodgers 

July 1784 Wm. (^Villiam) Penny 

Book 12, p 339 to James Rosa 

11 2 1784 St. of N. C. k Gov. Alex' Martin 

Book 12, p 116 to Robert Russell 

Mar. 1784 Robert Russell, Sr. 

Book 12, p 445 to James Russell 

8 7 1787 St. of N. C. & R'd. Caswell 

Book 13, p 375 to James Russell (Rusel) 

Oct. 1777 Susana and Asmus (Armus) 

Book 7, p 317 Binager to Charles Saverett 

10 22 1782 St. of N. C. Sc Alex' Martin 
Book 12, p 71 to William Scott 

11 2 1784 St. of N. C. & Alex' Martin 
Book 12, p 701 to Francis Seal 

8 7 1787 St. of N. C. k Richard Caswell 

Book 13, p 308 to Charles Secret 

Jan. 1788 John Barringer et al 

Book 13, p 400 to Phillip Self 

10 9 1783 St. of N. C. and Alex' Martin 

Book 12, p 150 to John Setsinger 

July, 1770 John & Elizabeth Mitchell 

Book 5, p 122 to Christian Sides 

6 25 1764 Arthur k Justina Dobbs 

Book 2, p 19 to Christian Sytes 

Jan. 1768 Simon and Margaret Hart 

Book 4, p 400 to Andrew Site 

April 1771 John k Elizabeth Mitchell 

Book 5, p 286 to Andrew Sites (Seitz) 

10 22 1782 St. of N. C. k Alex' Martin 

Book 12, p 690 to John Simmons 

8 7 1787 St. of N. C. k R'd. Caswell 

Book 13, p 232 to Jacob Slough 



31 acres 
Buffalo Creek 

70 acres #298 
Buffalow Creek 

300 acres #543 
Buffalow Creek 

60 acres 
Buffalo Creek 

100 acres 
Buffalo Creek 

306 acres #540 
Buffalow Creek 

306 acres 
Buffaloe Creek 

243 acres #683 
Buffaloe Creek 

9 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

140 acres #266 
Buffelow Creek 

50 acres #412 
Buffalew Creek 

134 acres 

Dutch Buffaloe Creek 

200 acres Dutch 
Buffalow Creek 

270 acres #331 
Buffalow &: 
Cold Water Crks. 

67 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

107 acres Buffalo 
Creek k Rocky River 

168 acres 
Buffalo Creek 

178 acres 

Dutch Buffalo Creek 

119 acres #217 Dutch 
Buffalow Creek 

150 acres #609 
Buffalo Creek 



122 



8 7 1787 
Book 13, p 307 

10 9 1783 
Book 12, p 118 

June 1786 
Book 12, p 616 

8 7 1787 
Book 13, p 215 

8 7 1787 
Book 13, p 216 

8 7 1787 
Book 13, p 217 

8 7 1787 
Book 13, p 218 

8 7 1787 
Book 13, p 230 

12 3 1762 
Book l,p463 

12 4 1762 
Book 1, p 464 

2 10 1765 
Book 6, p 650 

8 7 1787 
Book 13, p 205 

April 1774 
Book 7, p 369 



St. of N. C. & R'd. Caswell 
to Andra (Andrew) Slough 

St. of N. C. & Alex' Martin 
to Walter Smiley 



84 acres #713 Dutch 
Buffaloe Creek 

185 acres #300 
Buffalow Creek 



John Letsinger (Est) & Andrew 270 acres Cold Water 
Cocket (Est) Joseph Graham, &: Buffalo Crks. 
Shff.-to Robert Smith 



St. of N. C. & R'd. Caswell 
to William (Sr.) White 

St. of N. C. & R'd. Caswell 
to William (Sr.) White 

St. of N. C. &: R'd. Caswell 
to William (Sr.) White 

St. of N. C. & R'd. Caswell 
to William (Sr.) White 

St. of N. C. & R'd. Caswell 
to John (Sr.) White 

Henery Whitner 
to Michael Whitner 



Henry Whitner 

to Michael Whitner 



Arthur & Justina Dobbs 
to John Wilson (Willson) 



100 acres #717 
Buffalo Creek 

100 acres #724 
Buffalo Creek 

41 acres #594 
Buffalo Creek 

46 acres #706 
Buffalo Creek 

130 acres #686 
Buffalo Creek 

133 acres Anson 
County, S.W. side 
Catawba River 

133 acres 
Anson County 
Catawba River 

144 acres Buffalo 
Creek & Great 
Cold Water 



St. of N. C. & Gov. R'd. Caswell 312 acres #692 
to John Wylie Buffalo &: Cold 

Water Crks. 

Francis (Christian Heart) Yost 252 acres 

(Yoast) to Paul Yost (Yoast) Dutch Buffalo Creek 



These men of the Dutch Buffalo Creek vicinity were known to have 
participated in the Revolutionary War. Names taken from D.A.R. 
records. 



Barnhardt, Col. George 

Barnhardt, Christian 

Barnhardt, Mathias— b. 
Bushart 



4-3-1752, d. 6-6-1818, m. Ann Margaret 



Barringer, Col. John Paul-b. 64-1721, d. 1-1-1807, m. (1) Eisman (2) 
Blackwelder 



123 



Barringer, Capt. John-b. 11-26-1752, d. 8-25-1817, m. Christine Bur- 
linger 

Barringer, Capt. Mathias— b. 1747— m. Margaret Bushart 

Barringer, George Henry 

Beaver, Capt. Mathias 

Berger (Barrier), Col. George Henry-b. 1-30-1734, d. 3-30-1820, m. 
Catherine Casper 

Blackwelder, Caleb-b. 11-8-1722, d. 9-26-1794, m. Betsy Phiter 

Blackwelder, Charles 

Blackwelder, Sgt. Isaac-b. 11-17-1757, d. 1843, m. (1) Mary Phifer 
(2) Mary Redling 

Blackwelder, Jacob-b. 1763, d. 1836, m. (1) Elizabeth Ouillman (2) 
Susannah 

Blackwelder, John 

Blackwelder, Martin-b. 12-27-1766, d. 5-27-1840, m. (1) Elizabeth 
Misenheimer (2) Elizabeth Corl 

Boger, Daniel— b. 2-17-1748 in Pa. (uncle of Rev. George Boger) 

Bost, Elias 

Bost, George 

Bost, Jacob Sr.-b. 1-1-1753, d. 9-25-1830, m. Catherine 

Cline (Kline) Pvt. Michael-b. 1761, d. 1-9-1840, m. Fanny Killian 

Dry, Pvt. Jacob— b. between 1762-64, d. 8-11-1852, m. Elizabeth 

Dry, Isaac 

Dry, John Sr. 

Dry, David 

Faggart, Jacob 

Fisher, James 

Furr (Furrer), Sgt. Henry-b. 4-6-1762, d. 12-22-1851, m. (2) Catherine 
Goodman 

Goodman, Capt. William 

Garratt, Daniel (builder) Court House in Concord, 1st St. Johns 
Church 

Lentz, Dayvault, CA, b. 1740, d. 1812, m. (1) Elizabeth (2) Miss 
Halterman 

Lipe, Godfrey-b. 1759, d. 8-22-1845, m. Margaret 

Lippard, John 

Lyerly, Christopher Jr.— b. 1763, m. (1) Barbara (2) Maria, migrated 
to Illinois 

124 



Lyerly, Zacharias— b. 6-6-1751, d. 1848, m. Catherine Van Poole, mi- 
grated to Illinois 

Melchor, Pvt. John Sr.— m. Mary, d. 1787. From Pottstown, Pa. 

Melchor, Pvt. John Jr.-b. 1-1-1750, d. 8-20-1824, m. (2) Elizabeth. 
From Pottstown, Pa. 

Misenheimer, Jacob— b. 1752, d. 3-6-1821, m. Elizabeth Cress, daugh- 
ter of Philip Cress 

Misenheimer, Peter— b. 1755, d. 3-20-1835, m. Magdalena 

Reed, John-b. 1-6-1757, d. 5-28-1845 (born in Germany) m. Sarah 
Kiser 

Shinn, Capt. Joseph-b. 1-27-1751, d. 12-1804, m. Jane Ross 

Samuel Suther, Chaplain and Patriot. Wife was Elizabeth 

Theime (Tram) 

Tucker, George-b. 1740, d. 1-22-1805, m. Maria Dorothea 

Walker, Capt. George-b. 11-20-1745, d. 10-1833, m. Eleanor Hicks 

Walker, Paul 

Walker, William 

All these men came under the influence of Rev. Samuel Suther who 
became a Chaplain at the request of Governor Tryon who heard Suther 
preach at Coldwater Church. 



125 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Arend, (Arndt), Rev. John Gottfried, JOURNAL, (or Diary) 

Barrier, Smith, Jr., DEUTSCHLAND IN PIEDMONT, NORTH 
CAROLINA 

Bernheim, G. D., GERMAN SETTLEMENTS AND THE LU- 
THERAN CHURCH IN THE CAROLINAS 

Bernheim, G. D., GERMAN SETTLERS AND THE LUTHERAN 
CHURCH IN NORTH CAROLINA 

Bernheim, G. D., HISTORY OF THE GERMAN SETTLEMENTS 
AND OF THE LUTHERAN CHURCH IN NORTH AND 
SOUTH CAROLINA 

Boger, George, "DIARY OF GEORGE BOGER" 

Cassell, C. ^V., Fink, W. J., and Henkel, Elon A., HISTORY OF THE 
LUTHERAN CHURCH IN VIRGINIA AND EAST TENNESSEE 

Friedrich, Karl, von Frank zu Dofering, KRESS FAMILY HISTORY, 
Copyright, 1930 

Hammer, Carl, "RHINELANDERS OF THE YADKIN" 

Garrison, J. Siler, HISTORY OF THE REFORMED CHURCH IN 
VIRGINIA 

Good, J. I., HISTORY OF THE REFORMED CHURCH IN THE 

UNITED STATES 
HISTORY OF SAINT JOHN'S CONGREGATION, Original 

Record Book 

Hinke, ^Villiam J., MINISTERS OF THE GERMAN REFORMED 
CONGREGATIONS IN PENNSYLVANA AND OTHER COL- 
ONIES IN THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY 

Huffman, Charles Herbert, THE MEMORIAL FOUNDATION OF 
THE GERMANNA COLONIES IN VIRGINIA, THE FIRST 
DECADE, 1956-1966, and THE GERMANNA RECORD, No. 9 

Lefler k Newsome, THE HISTORY OF A SOUTHERN STATE- 
NORTH CAROLINA 

Leonard, Jacob Calvin, HISTORY OF SOUTHERN SYNOD, EVAN- 
GELICAL AND REFORMED CHURCH 

Meriwether, EXPANSION OF SOUTH CAROLINA. 1725-1765 

Morgan, J. L., HISTORY OF THE LUTHERAN CHURCH IN 
NORTH CAROLINA 

Morgan, J. L., Brown, Bachman S., Jr., Hall John, HISTORY OF 
THE LUTHERAN CHURCH IN NORTH CAROLINA 

Peeler. Banks J., A STORY OF THE SOUTHERN SYNOD, EVAN- 
GELICAL AND REFORMED CHURCH 

126 



, RECORD BOOK OF THE NORTH CAROLINA SYNOD, 

LUTHERAN CHURCH, 1810 

, REGISTER AND RECORDER, Court House, Cabarrus Coun- 
ty, Concord, N. C. 

, REGISTER AND RECORDER, Court House, Mecklenburg 

County, Charlotte, N. C. 

Salley, A. S., Jr., THE HISTORY OF ORANGEBURG COUNTY, 

(S. C.) Regional Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1969, pages 112- 
191 

Saunders, THE COLONIAL RECORDS IN NORTH CAROLINA, 
Vol. VIII 

Shipton, C. Lee, A HISTORY-ST. JOHN'S LUTHERAN CHURCH 
SAINT JOHN'S EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH, 

THE FIRST CONSTITUTION, Cabarrus County, N. C. 
SOUTH CAROLINA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE, Vols. 56 

and 21 

Welker, George W., A FIISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE CLASSIS 
OF NORTH CAROLINA 

Welker, George W., HISTORIC SKETCH OF THE REFORMED 
CHURCH IN NORTH CAROLINA 

Whitener, Russell Pinkney, A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE FAMILY 
OF THE REV. PINKNEY ALEXANDER WHITENER 

Williamson, HISTORY OF NORTH CAROLINA, Vol. II 

Woodmason, CAROLINA BACK COUNTRY ON THE EVE OF 
THE REVOLUTION 

ADDITIONAL SOURCES 

BAPTISMAL RECORDS, copied from the Bethel German Reformed 
Church records, 1817-1883, inclusive, as translated by Dr. G. D. 
Bernheim. 

BAPTISMAL RECORDS, Bethel Lutheran Church, 1837-1913, from 
their record. 

NAMES AND INFORMATION about German land holders along 
Dutch Buffalo Creek, prior to 1800, copied from the record of deeds 
issued in the Office of Register and Recorder, Mecklenburg County, 
Charlotte, N. C. 

NAMES AND DATES ON GRAVESTONES, Bethel German Re- 
formed Church cemetery, from 1806 to the present, copied by Carl 
T. Moose and Mrs. Bessie Allman Lentz. 

VARIOUS FACTS HAVE BEEN GLEANED FROM OTHER 

SOURCES THROUGH THE YEARS, INCLUDING: 

ADMINISTRATION OF ESTATES 

127 



CENSUS RECORDS 

CHURCH RECORDS 

DEEDS 

FAMILY BIBLES 

FAMILY GENEALOGICAL RECORDS 

GRAVE STONES 

LETTERS FROM OLD PASTORS 

LONDON, BRITISH BOARD OF TRADE 

PASSPORTS 

RECORDS OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE, RALEIGH, N. C. 

WILLS 



128 



INDEX-PART I 



Alamance, 2, 25, 48 
Amelia, 32 

Amelia Chapel, 20, 25, 48 
Amelia Township, 20, 21 
America, 11, 14, 15 
Anne, Queen of England, 2, 13 
Anson Covmty, VI, 1, 56 
Arcadia Township, 
Arend (Arndt) , John Gottfried, 
25, 26 

Baptisms, 28, 44 

Baptist, 7 

Barnhardt, Eleanor Lyles, 21 

Earnhardt, Matthias, 9, 23, 27, 33 

Earnhardts, 23 

Barrier, 44 

Banier, Andrew, 33 

Barrier, Brandon, 44 

Barrier, Frank C, 44 

Barrier, Jacob, 34 

Barrier, John, 27, 32, 50 

Earlier, Katherine, 34 

Barrier, Penny, 44 

Barrinoer, 5, 6 

Barringer, John Paul, 5, 6, 24, 49, 

51 
Barringer, Rev. Paul, D.D., 30 
Bear Creek, IX, X, 8, 22, 23 
Beaver, (Eiber) , 27 
Beaver, H. W., 31 
Bennett, Rev., 20 
Bernheim, G. D., D.D., 4, 7 
Bethel Reformed Church, 4 
Bethel German Reformed Church, 

VI, IX, X, XI, 1, 4, 19, 22, 23, 

24, 28, 29, 30, 31, 34, 48, 49, 50 
Bethel United Church of Christ, 

VI, 19, 48, 49 
Bithaln, 18 
Black Creek, 45 



Blackwelder, 27 
Blackwelder, Mary Ann, 33 
Bladen County, VI, 1, 5. 6 
Blankenbaker, Balthaser, 16 
Blankenbaker, Matthias, 16 
Blankenbaker, Nicholas, 16 
Blue Ridge Mountains, 3 
Boger Genealogy, 34, separate 

index 
Boger, Rev. George, 9, 10, 23, 33, 

43, 48, 49, 50 
Bost Hill Lutheran Church, 33 
Eostian, IX, X 
Eostian, Jonas, X 
Eostian, Maofdalene, X 
Eostian, Sarah, X 
Brick Church, 47 
British Army, 21 
British Board of Trade, 5 
British Government, 21 
Broad River, 18 
Brown, Eachman S., D.D., XI, 2, 

24,25 
Brown, B. S., Sr., D.D., 30 
Broyles, John, 16 
Brumbach, Elizabeth, wife of, 14, 

15 
Brumbach, Melcherd, 14, 15 
Buffalo Creek, 6, 33 
Buffalo Creek Church, 6, 22, 26, 

30, 33, 34 
Buffalo Creek Church, St. John's, 

28 
Burgomaster, 12 

Burial groimd donated to Luther- 
an Churches and Bethel G. R. 

Church, 31 
Buried prior to 1750, 30 
Bushart, 27 

Eushardt, Anna Margaret, 33 
Eushardt, Elizabeth, 33 



129 



Cabarrus County. VI, 1, 2, 5. 6, 7. 

9, 22, 25, 31, 44, 48, 54 
Campbell, Addie "Warlick, 5 
Camper, (Kemper) , Alice and 

husband. 14, 15 
Camper, John, 14. 15 
Canton, 12 

Carlou^h, Conrad C, 46 
Carolinas, 7 

Carolina 'Watchman, 25 
Carpenter, John, 16 
Carpenter, "William, 16 
Catawba County, 2, 4, 5, 7, 
Catawba Riyer, 3, 7 
Census, 47 

Chancer)' of Chur, 12 
Charleston, S. C, 7, 20, 21, 27 
Charles Town, 18 
Cherokees, 19 
Chimney, 30 
China Groye, 6 
Christman, Elizabeth, 46 
Christman, Michael, 45, 46 
Chur, 11, 42 
Church Records, 29, 49 
Clapp, Adam, 44 
Classis of N. C. foi-med 1831, 47 
Cline, 27 

Cline, Harry E. Ill, 30, 31 
Clore, James Carlton, 16 
Clore, James Cleyeland, 16 
Clore, Michael, 16 
Coetus, 18, 42 
Coldwater Church, 43, 44, 45, 46. 

47, 48 
Coldwater Charge, 30, 43 
Coldwater Creek, 8, 47 
Colonial Records, 6, 23 
Columbia, 18 
Concord, N. C, XI, 28, 43 
Confii-med April 7, 1974, 43, 50 
Congaree River, 17, 20 



Consistorial Coimcil, 26 

Constitution, 25. 26 

Cox, Rey. H. H., D.D., 30 

Cook. 27 

Cook. Michael. 16 

Council, 11 

Covered Wagon, 2, 27. 29 

Cress, X, 33 

Cress, Alice, X 

Cruse, Bernard W., LL.B., X. XI, 

1, 6 
Cumberland Valley, 3 
Cuntz, (Coontz) (Koons) John, 

and wife, 14 
Cuntz, Kathrina, 14 
Cuntz, John A., 14 
Cuntz, Kathrina, 14 

Davidson, 2, 48 

Davidson County, 25 

Davie County, 25 

Deacons, 26, 50 

Deed, copy of, 31 

Derr, 5 

Descendants, 43 

Dobbs, Governor, 5 

Dry, (Dreu) , 30, 44 

Dupert, Rev. Richard, 9, 18, 21 

Dutch Buffalo Creek, VI, 6, 8, 10, 

21. 22. 23, 24, 25. 26, 29, 41, 45. 

54 
Dutch Buffalo Creek Church, IV. 

VI, IX, X, 1, 8, 9, 10, 15, 21, 23, 

24, 25. 26. 28, 29, 30, 32, 41, 42. 

43, 44, 47, 48, 49, 51, 54 
Dutch Buffalo Meeting House, \^I. 

IX, 1. 30, 44, 47, 49, 54 
Dutch Second Creek. 8, 10 

Ebenezer, 18 

Edisto River, 19 

Elders, 26 

Elders Reformed Congregation, 

16, 50 
England, 11 



130 



Engle, Nola Janice, 43 
Episcopal Orders, 19 
Essenheim, 11 
Eiidy, 27 
Eudy, Esther, X 
Eudy, Jacob, X 
Europe, 6, 21, 26 
Evansjelical Lutheran, 21 
Evangelical Reformed, 21 
Evangelical & Reformed Church, 
15, 50 

Fauquier County, 15 
Fink, 27 

First Church Building, 25 
First German Reformed Congre- 
gation, 13 
Fishback, Agnes, & husband, 13, 15 
Fishback, John, 13, 15 
Fishback, Herman, & wife, 14, 15 
Fishback, Katrina, 
Fleshman, Zecharias, 16 
Foil, Catherine, 31, 32 
Foil, Edmond, 31, 32 
Fontaine, John, 14 
Forsyth County, 14, 25 
Froelich, 18 
Furr, 27 

Gasser, Rev. John, 20 
Gaston, 25 
Geiger, Abraham, 18 
Georgia, 18 

German, 7, 8, 14, 19, 21, 22, 26, 

41, 43 

German Settlements, 7, 20, 23, 41 

German Settlers, 6, 8, 10 

Germanna Colony, 13, 14, 15, 16 

Germans, 3, 5, 6, 14, 17, 18, 20, 21, 
25 

Germany, 2, 11, 15, 17, 18, 19 
German Lutheran, VI, IX, 1, 2, 
13, 16,29,49 



German Reformed, VI, IX, 1, 2, 7, 

13, 15, 18, 19, 20, 24, 25, 26, 28, 

29,49 
German Reformed Church, IX, 1, 

4, 11, 13, 15, 17, 21, 22, 24, 25, 

28, 30, 31, 32, 49, 50 
German Reformed tradition, 7 
Germ an town, 15, 17 
Giessendanner, John Ulric, 19, 20, 

21,44 

Giessendanner, John, 19 

Grace, Lower Stone Church, 7, 9, 

23, 24, 41, 45, 46, 47, 48 
Grafenried, Baron Christopher 

Von, 13 
Grafenried, Christopher Von, 7 
Great Swamp, 42 
Gregory, Christina, her husband, 

33 
Gregory, Christopher, & daughter, 

33 
Gregory, Christine, 33 
Grisons, 12 
Guilford County, 2, 25, 42, 47, 48 

Haeger, Anna Catherine, husband, 

14 
Haeger, Rev. John, 14, 15, 16, 17 
Hagler, Elizabeth, 10, 33 
Hagler's, Jacob, 10, 29, 33 
Hahn, Christine, and husband, 33 
Hahn, Henry, 33 
Hahn, Henry, 33 
Hall, Rev. John, D.D., XI 
Hanover, Germany, 26 
Harkey, 27 

Harnsberger, John, 16 
Hartsell, 33 
Haw River, 5 
Hebron Lutheran Church, 16, 17, 

25 
Heglers, 23 
Hessian, soldiers, 21 
Heynesman, Christine, 33 



HI 



Heynesman, ^Villiam, 33, 50 

Hillsboro, 33, 45 

Hince, 27 

Hitt, Elizabeth, & husband, 14, 15 

Hitt, Peter, 14, 15 

Hoffman, John, and wife, 14, 15 

Hoffman, Katrina, 14, 15 

Holland Synod, 42 

Holt, Michael, 16 

Holtzclaw, Jacob, and wife, 14, 15 

Holtzclaw, Margaret, 14, 15 

Holtzclaw, Henry, 14, 15 

Holtzclaw, John, 14, 15 

Holy Commimion, 28 

Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, 

30, 31 
Honeycutt, 33 
House, 27, 33 
Hurlocker, 33 
Hurlocker, Geraldine Barrier and 

husband, 44 
Hurlocker, Robert T., 44 
Hurlocker, Jill, 44 

Illinois, 33, 44 
Immigrants, 6 
Indians, 19 
Iredell County, 2, 25 
Irish Protestants, 5 
Iron Furnace, 14 

James River, 7 
Jarrett, 3, 33 
Jenny Wolf Creek, 10 
"Journal", 25 

Kaifer, Michael, 16 

Karriker, 27 

Kerker, Andrew, 16 

Keystone State, 2 

King of England, 26 

Klapp's Church, 9 

Kress Johann Nicolaus Heinrich, 

IX 
Kuhn, Christian, X 



Leased, 45, 46 

Lederer, John, 7 

Lefler, 27 

Lefler, (Loeffler) Theophilus. 22, 

23, 38 

Lehman, Elizabeth, 42 
Leinbach, 21 

Lentz, Adolphus Crooks, III 
Lentz, Mrs. Holly (nee Bessie All- 
man) , XI 
Leonard, Rev. J. C, D.D., 23 
Letters of Recommendation, 1, 11, 

12 
Limbach, 27 

Lincoln, 2, 10, 12, 25, 42 
Lincolnton, 12 
Lincoln County Reformed 

Church, 12 
Lingell, Lorentz, 46 
Linker, 33 
Lipe, 2, 7, 33 
Li taker, 33 

Little Buffalo Creek, 8, 10 
Lord Carteret, 3 
London, 17, 26 

Loretz, Andrew, 12, 18, 22, 42, 48 
Loretz, Andrew Jr., 6, 9, 11, 18, 20. 

42, 43 
Louis XIV, 2 

Lowder, Elizabeth, wife of 33 
Lowder, ^Villiam, & daughter, 33 
Lowder, Elizabeth, 33 
Lower Stone German Reformed 

Church, I 
Ludwig, 27 
Luchvig, Charles, 31 
Ludwig, H. T. J., 31 
Lumber River, 6 
Lutheran, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 15, 16, 17, 

18, 19, 21, 25, 26, 28, 29, 44, 48, 

53 
Lutheran Church, X, 1, 9, 10, 23, 

24, 26, 28. 43, 49, 51 



132 



Lutheran Colony of Germanna, 16 

Lyerly, Christine, 33 

Lyerlv, Christopher, 9, 10, 23, 26, 

27, '32, 34, 44, 50 
Lyerly, Elizabeth, 34 
Lyerly, Jacob, 9 
Lyerly, John, 32 
Lyerly, Zacharias, 33 
Madison, 16, 17 
Marcard, Rev. Nicholas, 10, 33 
Six early marriages from records 

Bethel Lutheran Church, 97 
Martin, Rev. James, 22, 41 
Martin, John Joseph, and wife, 

14, 15 
Martin, Mary Katrina, 14, 15 
Martin, Mayence, 11 
McCallister, R. Brown, III 
Mecklenburg County, VI, 1, 2, 6, 

26, 33, 34, 43, 44, 45 
Meeting House, 8, 24 
Mel, Conrad, 42 
Melchoir, 33 
Melcher, 27 
Memorial, 15 
Methodist, 7, 21 
Migrated, 88 
Miners, 13 

Misenheimer Family, 44 
Misenheimer, 27, 33, 44 
Misenheimer, Hal, and wife, 44 
Misenheimer, Judy, daughter, 44 
Misenheimer, Susan, 44 
Misenheimer, Peter, 44 
Misenheimer, R. W., 31 
Misenheimer Springs, 50 -'=^ 

Missionary, 42 

Montgomery Coimty, 6, 22, 23 
Montgomery County, 111., 33 
Monument,' III, 28, 29, 30, 31 
Moose, Barbara Bushardt, IX, 33 
Moose, Carl T., XI 
Moose, Charlotte F., IX 



Moose Family, 44 

Moose, Henry, IX 

Moose, Jacob, IX, 27 

Moose, John B., 27 

Moose, Mary Lingle, IX 

Moose, Mrs. Rebecca, 33 

Mooses, 23 

Moravian, 5, 7 

Morgan, Rev. Jacob, D.D., XI 

Motz, John, 16 

Mount Pleasant, 1, 5, 9, 28, 30 

Moyer, George, 16 

Mount Olive Lutheran Church, 

30, 31 
Mount Zion Reformed Church, 6, 

35, 39 
Muhlenburg, 25 
Mull, Mary (Wife of Henry 

Vv^eidner) , 7 
Myer, Meier, 27 

Nassau, Seisren, 13, 15 
Neuchatel, Switzerland, 19 
New Berne, 7 
New Bethel Lutheran Church, 

29, 50 

New England, 7 

New Gilead Reformed Church, 

30, 43 

New Hanover County, VI, i 
North Branch of Dutch Buffalo, 

45 
North Carolina, 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 12, 

14, 17, 25, 26, 31, 41, 42, 43 
North Carolina Synod Lutheran 

Church, 24, 28 
Nussman, Rev. Adolph, 10, 25, 26, 

27, 43, 48 

Oldest Religious Organization in 

W. N. C, 43 
Orange County, N. C, 5, 13, 25, 

45, 47 
Orange County, Va., 13 



133 



Orano-ebur^ Count\, S. C, 18, 41. 

45, 47 
Orangeburg, S. C. 7, 19, 21 
Ordained, 39 
Organ (Zion) Church, 26 

Paulas, Catherine, and husband. 

11 
Paulas, John Michael, 1 1 
Peck, Andrew, 33 
Peck, Barbara, 32 
Peck ,Elizabeth, 32, 33 
Peck, Frederick, 32, 33 
Peck, Frederick, 33 
Peeler, Rev. Banks J., D.D., XI, 23 
Penager, 1 8 
Penninger, 27, 44 
Pennsbm-g, Pa.. 42 
Pennsvlvania. 2, 3. 4. 6, 8, 21, 22, 

23, 42 
Pennsyhania "Deitsch". 2 
Pennsylvania Dutsch, 
Pennsylvania Gazette, 43 
Percy, Captain Hugh, 42 
Piedmont Section of N. C, 1, 5, 

6, 19 
Perkiomen Seminary, 42 
Petition. 5, 17, 20, 28 
Philadelphia, 17, 25, 42 
Piedmont Section of X. C. IX, 1. 

5, 6, 22, 25 
Pig Iron, 14 
Pilgrim Reformed Church, 

Davidson County, 47 
Plaster, 27 
Plyler, 27 
Presbyterian, 7 
Propst, Henr\, 5, 27 
Protestant Refugees, 2 
Puny, Jean, 19 
PuiT}'sburg, 19 

Quaker, 7 

Radernher, J., 11 



Rector, Elizabeth, and husband, 

14, 15 
Rector, Jacob, and son, 14. 15 
Rector, John, 14, 15 
Reformed, 1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. 

14, 15. 17, 18, 19. 20. 21. 23, 42. 

43, 44, 48, 50 
Reformed Churches, 10. 12. 43 
Reformed Congregation, 42 
Reformed Schoolmaster, 43 
Relocation, 22 
Rent, 29 
Revolution, 20 
Revolutionary AVar, 21, 26 
Revolutionary 'War Heroes, 123, 

124, 125 
Richfield, 50 
Richmond, 6 
Ridding, 27 
Ridenhour, 27 
Ridenhour, Catherine, 33 
Ridenhour, Elizabeth, 33 
Ridenhour, John, 33 
Ridenhour, Moses, 33 
Ridenh£)m-, Xicholas, 33 
Riemensperger, John Jacob, 20 
Rintleman. Christopher. 6 
Ritchie, 27 
Rockwell, 1. 7 

Rowan, 2, 5, 6. 7, 42. 45, 48 
Rowan, Agent Matthew, 5 
Rowan Count), 5, 21, 23, 25, 26 
Rowan and Mecklenburg 

Battalions, 45 
Royal Court, 26 
Russell, Mrs., 20 

Sacraments administered, 9 
Saint Michael's Day, 42 
Salisbun-, 6 
Saluda River, 18 
Sandy Run, ^8 
Santee River, 7 



134 



Saussman, 27 

Savannah, 19, 21 

Savitz Church (Mt. Zion) , 1, 6, 43 

Saw Mill Creek, 45 

Saxe-Gothe Township, 7, 17, 18, 

29 
Schaefer, Elizabeth Lehman, 42 
Schmidt, Andrew, 10 
Schmidt, Anne, wife of 
Schmidt, Christopher, 33 
Schneider, 18 
School Masters, 42, 43 
Schwenkfekler Historical Society, 

42 
Scotch-Irish, 3, 6 
Second Church, 21 
Second Creek, 6, 8, 23, 25 
Second Germanna Colony, 16 
Seigen Forest, 1, 15 
Seitz, Henry, 32, 50 
Seitzes, 23 

Seyfert, John Christian, 41, 42 
Sheible, George, 16 
Shennandoah Valley, 3, 17 
Sherrill's Ford, 7, 8 
Ship, "Lydia" 
Ship, "Samuel", 42 
Shipion, Rev. C. Lee, 24, 25 
Shives (Scheibe) , Jacob, 5 
Shue (Shoe), 27 
Sides, Amelia, wife of, 32 
Sides, Flenry, 32, parents of 
Sides, Benjamin, 32 
Sides, Charlie, 32 
Sides, Henry, Jr., 32 
Sides, John, 32 — 

Sides, Joseph, 32 
Sides, Levi, 32 
Sides, Moses, 32 
Sides, Steven, 32 
Sides, William, 32 
Sifford, 28 



Slater, Michael, 43 

Smith, 5 

Smith, Andrew, 10, 33, and wife 

Smith, Elizabeth, 10, 33 

Smith, Christine, 33, wife of 

Smith, Henry, 9, 32, 33 

Smith, Henry, Jr., 33 

Smith, Matthew, 16 

Smith, Michael, 16 

Snyder, Henry, 16 

Sold, 45 

Some Ministers who served Dutch 

Buffalo Creek Church, 41 
South Carolina, 1, 7, 12, 17, 18, 19, 

20, 21, 22, 41, 43, 47 
Spillman, John, 14, 15, and wife 
Spillman, Mary, 14, 15 
Sponsor, 42 

Spotsylvania County, Va., 13 
Spotswood, Alexander, Governor, 

13, 15, 17 
Springer, 28 
Stanly County, VI, IX, 2, 9, 22, 

23, 48, 50 
Stikeleather, 27 
St. James German Reformed 

Church, 47 
St. John's Church, Union County, 

111., 34,44 
St. John's Lutheran Church, Ca- 
barrus County, VI, IX, 1, 9, 24, 

25, 26, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 34, 44, 

48, 49, 50, 54 
St. Peter's Lutheran Church, 8 
Stokes, 25 
Stone, 30 

Stover, Rev. John Casper, 17, 25 
Suder, widow, S. C. Census report, 

1790, 47 
Suther, 27 

Suther, Elizabeth, 44 
Suther, Elizabeth, 44 
Suther, Jacob, 44 



135 



Suther, Johann Henry, 44 

Slither, O. Rush, 43 

Suther, Viola, 43 

Suther, Samuel, 6, 9. 18, 21, 41. 43. 

44, 45, 46, 48 
Suther, O. \Villiam, 27 
Swiss, 5, 7, 8, 18, 19, 21, 43 
Switzerland, 11, 19, 20, 42 

Teacher, 26 

Theus, Rev. Christian, 7, 18, 20. 

21, 41, 48 
Thanksgiving Day, 1894, 30 
Tobler, Johannes, 20 
Trinity Tulpehocken record, 42 
Troutman, Adam, X 
Troutman, Peter, X 
Tryon, Governor, 44 
Tucker, George, 46 

Union Churches, 17, 43, 49 
United Church of Christ, IX, 1. 4. 

43 
Union Congregations, VI 
Union County, 6, 44 
Utz, George, 16 

Van Poole, Catherine, 32 
Virginia, 1, 7, 13, 17, 21, 22, 25 
Voigt, Rev. Prof., D.D., L.L.D., 27 

Walker, (^Valcher) , 125 
Warlick, Rev. Charles \V., D.D., 4 
Warlick, Charles W., Jr., 5 
Warlick. Daniel H., 5 



Warlick, Frederick, 4 
\Varlick, Joe R., 5 
W^arlick, John Daniel, 4 
'Watts Cross Roads, 28 
^Veaver, Anne mother of, 14, 15 
"Weaver, Dillman, 14, 15 
\Veddings, 44 
Wehber, Werber, 41 
\Veidner, Heinrich, (Henry 

\\'hitener) , 4, 7, 8 
Welker, Rev. George \\L, D.D., 

7, 9 
Wertz, Rev. J. Q., 30 
Weyberg, Rev. Samuel, 9, 23, 41 
\Vidow, "Suder", 42 
Wiess, George Michael, 42 
W^illiam of Orange, 19 
Williamson, 3 
Willy, Rev. Barnard, 42 
Winston-Salem, 5 
^Vitness, 44, 46 
W'urtemburg, Germany, Duchy of, 

51 

Yadkin River, 3 
Yager, Mary Frances, 16 
Yager, Nicholas, 16 
Yowell, May Frances, 16 

Zimmerman, Christopher, 16 
Zouberbuhler, Rev. Bartholomew, 

20 
Zubly, Rev. John Joachim, 20 
Zurich, 20 



136 



INDEX TO DIARY AND LIFE OF GEORGE BOGER 



Anthony, Rev. J. B., 40 

Baptized, 38, 40 

Barnhardt, Elizabeth, 40 

Barringer, Henry, 39 

Bavaria, 37 

Berks County, 36 

Berlin, Pa., 36 

Bethany, Davidson County, 35 

Bethel German Reformed Church, 

Stanly County, 35, 37 
Beulah Church, Davidson County, 

OO 

Bieber, Ludwig, 39 

Boger, 36, 37 

Boger. Alice, 36 

Boger, Mrs. Caroline, 35 

Boger, C^harles, 36 

Boger, Christian, 36, 37, 38 

Boger, Christian, 36 

Boger, Cyrus A. M., 36, 37 

Boger, Cyrus, Jr., 36 

Boger, Cyrus A. M., Letter with 

information about familv 1894, 

36, 37 
Boger, Daniel, 36 
Boger, Rev. George, 34, 37, 38, 40 
Boger, Rev. George, Life story,38 
Boger, Hans Paulus, 35, 36, 37, 38 
Boger, Henry, 36 
Boger, Jacob, 36, 38 
Boger, Children of Jacob, 36 
Boger, Children of Jacob, 36, 37, 

38, 40 and Barbara Lefler Bowr, 

38 

Boger, James William, 40 

Boger, Joseph, 36 

Boger, John, 36 

Boger, John, 36 

Boger, Martin, 36, 37 

Boger, Matthew, 36, 37, 38 

Boger, Matthias. 35, 37, 38 



Boger, Peter, 36 

Boger, Children of Matthias, 41 
Boger, Michael, 35, 36, 37, 38 
Boger, Reformed Church, 34 
Children of Jacob and Barbara 

Lefler Boger, 38 

Daniel, 38 

Elizabeth, 38 

Jacob, 38 

Catherine, 38 (married Jacob 

File, LTncle of Connie File.) 

George, 38 

Children of George and Elizabeth 

Barnhardt Boger: 40 

Anna, 40 

Daniel Monroe, 40 

Eliz Betsy, 40 

Eva Eliz, 40 

John F., 40 

James William, 40 

John George, 40 

John William, 40 

Leah, 40 

Marraret, 40 

Matthias, 40 
Children of George and Elizabeth 

File Boger: 40 

Jacob, 40 

Sallie (Not written) , 41 

Salome, 41 
Children of Matthias Boger: 41 

Peter, 41 

Jacob, 41 

Daniel, 41 

Elizabeth, 41 

Margaretta, 41 
Children of Jacob Boger: 41 

Daniel, 41 

Eliz, 41 

Jacob, 41 

Catherine, 41 

Georsre, 41 
Boger, Valentine, 36, 38 



137 



Boger, W^illiam, 36 
Buffalo Creek, 34, 37, 39 
Buried, 40 

Cabarrus County, 37, 38, 39 

Casper, Henry, 39 

Catechmnens, 39 

Churches served by Boger, 35 

Classis of N. C. 44 

Colonial Records of Pennsylvania 

35 
Communion services, 39 
Confirmed, 39, 40 
Confirmed Evangelical and 

Reformed Chinch, 39 
Correll, Adam, 39 
Correll. Jacob, 39 
Correll, Joseph, 39 

Death of Georo;e Boarer, 40 
Diary of George Boger, 34, 35, 37 
Divinity study, 39 
Dutch Buffalo Creek, of Meeting 
House, 34, 37 

East Rowan Charge, 34 
Educated, 40 
Elizabeth, 40 

Emmanuel, Davidson County, 35 
English, 39 

Evangelical and Reformed 
Church, 39 

File, Elizabeth, 40 
Fink, James C, 35 
Foil, Rosina, 38 
Fox, Dr. M. D., 36, 38 
Frederick City, Md., 40 
Fimeral of Boger, 40 
Funeral Services, 40 

Carman, 34, 39 

German Families, 34, 36, 37 

German Reforaied Families, 

34, 37 
Goodman, George, 38 



Grace, "Lower Stone", 35, 40 

Hagler, Elizabeth, 39 
Hentziy, Joseph, 38, 39 

Lancaster County Lebanon Town- 
ship, 36, 38 

Lefler, (Loefferin, Loeffer) 
Barbara, 37, 38 

Lefler, (Loetter) , Christopher, 39 

Lefler, Theophilus, 38 

Letter from Cyrus Boger, A. M., 
oo 

Lincoln County, 39 

Lindler (Leefler) , Christopher. 
39 

Lindler, Jacob, 39 

Lochland and Longswamp, 37 

Loefferin, Barbara, 37 

Loetter (Lefler) , Jacob, 38 

Loretz, Andrew Jr., 39 

"LoAver Stone Church", 40 

Lyerly, Christopher, 39 

Macedonia Township, 36, 37, 38 

Married couples, 40 

Married three times (Boger) , 40 

ALaxatawny Township, 36, 38 

Migrated, 36, 37, 38, 39 

Misenheimer, Jacob, 39 

Mt. Zion (Saviiz) Church, 34, 39 

New Gilead, Cabarrus Coiuity, 35 
North Carolina, 34, 38 

Ohio, 36 
Ordained, 35, 39 

Palatinate, 35, 37, 38 

Peeler, Michael, 39 

Pennsylvania, 38 

Persecution, 38 

Piercy, Hugh of London 

Philadelphia, 35, 37, 38 

Prayer of Boger, 39 

Prisoner, 40 

Protestants of the Palatinate, 37 



.138 



Record of Ministerial duties, 40 

Reformed Church, 39 

Reider, Jacob, 39 

Revohition, 36 

Rhine, 37 

Roman Catholic, 38 

Rotterdam, 35, 38 

Rowan County, 35, 39 

Sacraments, 39 
Salisbury, 39 

Savitz Church, (Mt. Zion) , 39 
Schlump, Martin, 39 
Schmetter, William, 39 
School, 37, 39 
School teacher, 38 
Schuman, Christian, 39 
Seibert, Frederick, 39 
Settlements, 39 



Sermons preached, 40 

Seventeenth century, 37 

Ship, "Samuel", 35, 38 

Shuman, John, 39 

Shuping, Nicholas, 39 

Sketch of life of George Boger,37 

Somerset County, 36 

South Carolina, 36 

St. John's Lutheran Church, 37 

Storcli, Rev., 39 

Slither, Rev. Samuel, 38 

Teacher, 38 

Viro^inia, 36 

Whit Sunday, 39 
Wineburg (Weyburg) , Rev. 
Samuel, 39 

Yeoman, John, 39 



INDEX TO JOHN PAUL BARRINGER AND FAMILY 



America, 51 

American Independence, 52 

Anson County, 51 

Barnhardt, Christian, 52 
Barnhardt, Col. John, 52 
Barringer, Anna Marie, 52 
Barringer, Catherine, 51, 52 
Barrinoer, Daniel, 53 
Barringer, Hon. D. M., 52 
Barrinsrer, Daniel Morean, 53 
Barringer, Daniel Morean, Jr., 53 
Barringer, George Henry, 52 
Barringer, John, 51, 52 
Barringer, Col. John Alston,53 
Barringer, John Paul, 51, 52, 53 
Barrineer, Lewis, 53 
Barringer (Berringer) Matthias, 

52 
Barringer, General Paul, 52, 53 
Barringer, Paul Brandon, 53 
Barringer, Pauline, 51 



Barringer, Rufus, 52, 53 
Barrinoer, Wilhelm, 51 
Barrinoer, William, 53 
Barringer, Victor Clay, 53 
Blackwelder, Catherine, 52 
British, 52 

Brown, John Commander, 52 
Buffalo Creek, 51 
Bushart, Miss, 52 

Cabarrus County, 51, 53 

Camden, S. C, 52 

Captured, 52 

Catawba County, 52 

Cherokee Indians, 52 

Cook, Nicholas, 52 

Court House Square, Newton, 52 

Daughter of Family, 52 
Deceased, 53 
Dutch Buffalo Creek, 51 
Dutch Buffalo Creek area, 53 



139 



Dutch Buffalo Creek Meeting 
House, 51, 52, 53 

Edict of Nantes, 51 
England, 51 
English, 52 

Fisman. Ann (Floz?) , 51 
French Hugenots, 51 

German People, 51 
Germany, 51, 52 
Gold Hill, 52 

Immigrants, Rupp's list of, 52 
Indian Campaign, Riuherford's, 
52 

Killed, 52 

Legislatiue of N. C, 52 
Lincoln, Now Catawba County, 52 
Little Dutch Buffalo Creek, 52 
Lutheran, 51, 53 
Lutheran Church, St. John's 
Evangelical, 53 

Mecklenburg County, 51, 52 
Miw-ration, 51 
Mississippi pioneer, 53 



Montgomery County, 52 
Monument, 52 

Newton, 52 

North Carolina, 51, 52, 53 

0\enshine or Overcash, 52 

Parents, 52 
Pennsylvania, 51, 52 
Philadelphia, Pa., 51, 52 
"Poplar Grove", 51 
Prison, 52 

Re\oluLionary AVar, 52 
Rotterdam, 51 
RoTvan Cotmty, 52 

Spanish American W^ar. 53 
Ship, "Palina", 52 
Ship, "Phoenix", 51 

Tennessee, 53 

■\\'ar Bet^veen the States, 53 
War of 1812, 52 

\\'ilson. Commander ^Villiam, 51 
"W'urtemburg, Dutchy of, 51 
Wyoming Valley, 51 



140 



BOOK TWO 

BETHEL (BEAR CREEK) CHURCH 

1806 1974 

Compiled by 
Thomas L. Moose and Reedy J. Moose 

After the Rev. Mr. Frank Bostian and Mr. Bernard Cruse completed 
their history of Dutch Buffalo Meeting House, from ■which Bethel had 
its origin, the Historical Committee expressed a desire to have the 
history of Bethel brought up to date, thereby having two books within 
one cover. The Spiritual Dreams of the church in 1806 were not dead. 
The growth and history of Bethel is note^vorthy and of inspirational 
value for the present members, their children and the Reformed and 
Lutheran Churches. 

Helen Lyerly— Chairman 
Mack I. Cline 
Mary Alice Moose 
Banks Barrier 
Joe B. Moose 

Historical Committee 
Sidney J. Hartsell— Chm. Consistory 
Henry J. Meier— Pastor 



1974 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



FOREWORD 
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 



III 
IV 



BETHEL (BEAR CREEK) CHURCH I 
EARLY BEGINNINGS 

CHURCH ROLLS 2—8 

FAMILY NAMES 8, 9 

SOCIAL ACTION IN EARLY YEARS 9, 10 

CABARRUS GETS A NEW ROAD II 
OLD FRIEND PART COMPANY ■ "^ 11, 12 

CHURCH DISCIPLINE 13 

BETHEL BECOMES PART OF A CHARGE 14 

NOTED SONS OF BETHEL 14 

SOCIAL LIFE IN THE CHURCH 14, 15 

GROWTH AND EXPANSION 15, 16 

ORGANIZATIONS AT WORK 17 

OUR YOUTH, THE HOPE OF THE FUTURE 18 

YOUTH MINISTRY 18 

BOY SCOUTS 18, 19 

DAILY VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL 19 

BETHEL BECOMES A ONE CHURCH CHARGE 20 

BETHEL MEMBERS NEVER IDLE 21, 22 

BETHEL CONFERS HONORS 22 

MINUTES ARE FOR READING 23 

BUFFALO AND BEAR CREEK INDUSTRIES 24 

MILITARY SERVICE RECORDS 24, 25 

MEMORIALS 25 
CHURCH ROLLS AS OF 1974, INCLUDING FAMILIES 26—29 

PHOTOSTATIC COPIES OF DOCUMENTS 30—47 

PICTURE SECTION 48 

INDEX OF NAMES AND PLACES 131 

INDEX OF PICTURES 135 

II 



FOREWORD 

Our country will be celebrating its two hundreth anniversary in the 
year 1976. Our forefathers had been here many years ahead of signing 
The Declaration Of Independence. Persecuted and driven from their 
homes in the old country, they sought freedom to worship in a new 
land. Many died on the journey to America, the land of promise and 
freedom. They suffered hardship and peril as they cleared the land and 
built their homes. Like the children of Israel, everywhere they trav- 
elled, they built altars to God in thanksgiving and worship. They 
defended their new freedom with body, mind and soul. Our Lutheran 
and Reformed forefathers were with George Washington at Valley 
Forge, with Robert E. Lee at Appomatox; their sons, grandsons and 
great grandsons were with General Pershing in the Argonne Forest, 
with General Eisenhower on the coast of Normandy. Their footprints 
are in the sands of North Africa and on Iwo Jima. Many sleep beneath 
foreign soil. 

Can July 4, 1976 be less than a Day of Reckoning to our Creator, 
Sustainer and Redeemer as well as to our forebears? We, like the 
Prodigal Son, have received our inheritance and gone into a Far Coun- 
try. Our society has squandered its inheritance. We have lost control of 
our health, money, religion, education and personal safety. Never has 
it been so urgent to find our way back to the Faith of Our Fathers and 
the old Meeting House. 

Let this book be our contribution to the celebration of our Nation's 
two hundredth anniversary. Let us become true keepers and guardians 
of the shrine our forefathers built. Let us be true acolytes at the hearth 
fires they lit in the first log cabins in this, their promised land, and 
our heritage. 

Thomas L. Moose 



III 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

In expressing appreciation for those who have made a book of this 
kind possible we must first pay tribute to those who pioneered the 
way. Then we think with deep gratitude of our own parentage. Finally 
we are thankful for all those who have preserved the spirit of our 
ancestors to this day. 

It renewed one's Faith in God and Country to see the pride of sons, 
daughters and grandchildren as they got out the albums and boxes of 
old pictures. Their eyes sparkled as they remembered, and many in- 
teresting tales were told of the past. True, we must not live in the past, 
but what an inspiration our memories can be as we follow in the 
footsteps of those who have gone ahead in striving for "The Mark of 
the High Calling". What better way to celebrate our Nation's two 
hundredth birthday than to recall what made her great. 

So, to the members of Bear Creek Church, Thank You for giving 
us this opportunity. To all who have contributed material of any sort, 
pictures, records, interesting stories (even if not used), our hearty 
thanks. 

May reading this book give you as much pleasure as we had in 
getting it together for you. 

T.L.M. 

RJ.M. 



IV 



BETHEL (BEAR CREEK) CHURCH 

In 1771 the Lutherans decided to build a church of their own. The 
name was changed from Buffalo Meeting House to St. John's Lutheran. 
This was some distance for the Lutheran and Reformed members who 
lived on east side of Buffalo Creek and on Little Bear Creek to travel. 
They began holding services in their homes and barns. Occasionally a 
minister would visit, preach and perform other services requiring 
clerg)'. Attendance at St. John's began to taper off. Services were held 
with some regularity in barns of Christopher Lyerly and Mathias 
Barnhardt. Suther, Loretz, Weyberg and Boger preached for them 
whenever possible. In 1803 Christopher Lyerly and Christopher Leofler 
signed a petition for the ordination of Rev. George Boger as pastor. 

The cemetery was already established. Theophilus Gottleib Loetter, 
a brilliant German school teacher who taught near the present church, 
was the first person buried there. His last resting place was marked by 
Daniel M. Moose. The monument may be seen today. 

Erection of the first church building was begun March 21, 1806. The 
first sermon was preached on the Day of Pentecost, May 25, 1806, by 
the pastor. Rev. George Boger. 

This church was built of hewed pine logs. The Charleston Society 
sent three boxes of window panes. Christopher Lyerly was the architect. 
He and Henry Seitz were installed as deacons in November 1806. They 
served five years, then were made elders. William Heynsemann and 
John Berger (Barrier) were installed as deacons. It is said to have been 
thirty years before this church building was completed. 

The church families were filled with joy over their new congregation 
and caused a document to be recorded. This document, entitled "LAUS 
DEO" (PRAISE THE LORD) is in the church Record Book. 

Following is just a portion of its declaration: 

"We have colonized ourselves in North America and located our- 
selves in the eastern part of North Carolina in the eastern portion of 
Cabarrus County and the western portion of Montgomery County at 
the so called streams Bear and Buffalo Creeks; and that we have named 
ourselves after our forefathers, THE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN 
AND EVANGELICAL REFORMED CHURCH, and that we through 
baptism and confirmation have become inseparated w4th the same as 
members thereof; 

William Haynseman, John Berger, Heinrich Hahn, Christopher 
Lyerle, Matthias Barnhardt, Zacharias Lyerle, Heinrich Smith, Chris- 
tian Gregory, Jacob Heglar, Leonard Johannes Leib, John Leib, 
Christopher Seizt, Frederick Peck, Jacob Berger, Christopher Leofler, 
Heinrich Bleiler, Johannes Reitenaur, William Lauten, Andreas 
Schmith, Barbara Muse." 

The original LAUS DEO was in German. 

1 



Members of German Reformed Church, Bethel (Bear Creek) 
Congregation 1839 



Males 

John C. Earnhardt 
David Moose 
George Earnhardt 
George Moose 
John Moose 
Christopher Sides 
Jacob Fisher 
John Lowder 
Samuel Barger 
Moses Sides 
Mathias Sides 
Mathias Moose 
Jacob Shoe 
Henry Shoe Jr. 
William Lowder Jr. 
Peter Earnhardt 
Jacob Barger 
George M. Earnhardt 
John Earnhardt 
Mathias Louder 
Martin Shoe 
Mathias Earnhardt 
Jacob C. Earnhardt 
Tobias Pliler 
Daniel Pliler 
Nelson Barrier 
George Barrier 



In May 1854 these Reformed members were listed: 

Males Females 



Females 

Ester Sides 

Elizabeth Sides 

Elizabeth Plyler 

Elizabeth Moose 

Rachel Moose 

Lea Earnhardt 

Sophia Reacher 

Elizabeth Lowder 

Sarah Louder 

Mary Sides 

Mary Ann Moose 

Lydia Barbara Moose 

Elizabeth Barger 

Nancy Walcher 

Ann Margaret Earnhardt 

Julia Ann Earnhardt 

Mary Haythcock 

Margaret Amanda Earnhardt 

Rosena Earnhardt 

Patsa Earnhardt 

Catherine Culp 

Barbara Moose 



George Earnhardt— Elder 
John Moose— Elder 
Edmund Barrier- Deacon 

(deceased) 
Daniel Plyler— Deacon 
Jacob Fisher 



Milly Shoe 

Mary Barrier 

Martha Earnhardt (deceased) 

Catherine M. Moose 

Elizabeth Moose 

Mary C. Earnhardt (Fisher) 



John H. Shoe 

Jacob Barrier 

Mathias Barrier (deceased) 

Tobias Miller (deceased) 

Henry B. Barrier 

George Lefler 

Jacob Shoe 

Edmund Shoe 

Nelson Barrier (deceased) 

Caleb Barrier 

George H. Barrier (deceased) 

George Franklin Barnhardt 

(deceased) 
Henry Shoe Jr. 
George M. Barnhardt 
Daniel M. Moose Sr. 
Daniel M. Moose Jr. 
John C. Barnhardt (deceased) 
Caleb A. Moose 
Frederick Barrier (deceased) 
Tobias Plyler 
Jacob C. Barnhardt 
Mathias Barringer (deceased) 
Alfred Bidwell Barnhardt 
Andrew Barrier (deceased) 
Jacob N. Barrier 
John Barrier 
Isaac Shoe 
George Moose 
Alexander Barrier 
Alexander Shoe 
Reuben 'Weaver (deceased) 
Martin Shoe 
John C. Barnhardt 



Nancy Barrier 

Elizabeth Barrier 

Mary Lyerle 

Catherine Barrier 

Easter Barrier 

Sally Barrier 

Sophia Shoe 

Juliana Shoe 

Lea Barrier 

Rosina Miller (deceased) 

Milly 'Weaver 

Sally Shoe 

Betsy Shoe 

Susanah Sides 

Barbara Shoe (deceased) 

Jane Adeline Barnhardt 

Leah B. Styers 

Rosina Biles (deceased) 



August 8, 1868 these Reformeds were listed: 



Male 

George Barnhardt— Elder 
John Moose— Elder 
Daniel Plyler— Deacon 



Females 

Catherine M. Moose (Jno. Moose) 
Milly Shoe (Jno.) 
Elizabeth Barringer (-^vidow) 



C. A. Moose— Deacon 

Jacob Barrier 

Henry B. Barrier 

Jacob N. Barrier 

George Lefler 

Tobias Plyler 

John M. Barnhardt 

John H. Shoe 

Alexander Shoe 

Daniel M. Moose Sr. 

Daniel M. Moose Jr. 

George Moose 

John F. Moose 

Alfred Bidwell Barnhardt 

(deceased) 
James E. H. Barnhardt 
John A. Barrier 
Marshall L. Barnhardt 
Alexander Barrier 
John Barrier 
John L. Peck 



These confirmands were in the records: 



Susanah Sides (widow) 
Sarah Shoe (A. Shoe) 
Elisabeth Shoe 
Christina Shoe 
Juliann Corl 
Ester Milly Peacock 
Amelia Barrier 
Elizabeth Barrier 
Mary Sides 
Lydia Sides 
Juliann Barringer 
Mary Barrier (widow) 
Nancy M. Peck (J. L. Peck) 
Mary L. Plyler (Daniel) 
Sophia Moose (D. M.) 
Matilda Barrier (Jno.) 



Confirmand 

Edmond B. Barrier 
Mathias Barrier 
Caleb A. Moose 
Daniel M. Moose Sr. 
Daniel M. Moose Jr. 
Mathias Barringer 
George F. Barnhardt 
Marshall Barnhardt 
Alfred Bidwell Barnhardt 
James E. H. Barnhardt 
Nancy M. Moose 



Year 

1844 
1844 
1844 
1849 
1849 
1849 
1849 
1864 



1864 



Pastor 

Lantz 

Lantz 

Lantz 

Lantz 

Lantz 

Lantz 

Lantz 

Butler 

Butler 

Butler 

Butler 



Reformed Church enrollment, June 1872 
Male 



Female 



George Moose— Elder 
Tobias Plyler— Elder 



Catherine M. Moose (Jno. Moose) 
Milly Shoe (Jn. Shoe) 



John F. Moose— Deacon 

John M. Earnhardt— Deacon 

Jacob Barrier 

Henry B. Barrier 

Jacob N. Barrier 

George Lefler 

Daniel Plyler 

John H. Shoe 

Alexander Shoe 

Daniel M. Moose Sr. 

Daniel M. Moose Jr. 

John H. Moose 

James E. H. Barnhardt 

John A. Barrier 

Marshall Lank Barnhardt 

Alexander Barrier 

John Barrier 

John L. Peck 

Luther H. Moose 

John W. Moose 

C. A. Moose 
John Moose 

Names in book March 5, 1875 

George Moose— Elder 
John F. Moose— Elder 
John AL Barnhardt— Deacon 

D. AL Moose— Deacon 
Jacob Barrier (deceased) 
Henry Barrier (deceased) 
George Lefler (deceased) 
John H. Shoe (deceased) 
Alexander Shoe 

D. Monro Moose 

John H. Moose 

James E. H. Barnhardt (deceased) 

John A. Barrier 

Marshal L. Barnhardt 

Alexander Barrier 

John Barrier 

John L. Peck 



Elizabeth Barringer (^\•idow) 

Susanah Sides (^vidoAv) 

Sarah Shoe (Alex Shoe) 

Elizabeth Shoe 

Julean L. Corl 

Ester Milly Peacock 

Amelia Barrier 

Elizabeth Barrier 

Mary Sides 

Lydia Sides 

Atta L. Moose 

Catherine Peacock 

Mary E. Moose 

Julean Barringer 

Mary Barrier (Avido'^v) 

Nancy M. Peck (J. L. Peck) 

Mary L. Plyler (D. Plyler) 

Sophie Moose (Dan. Monro Moose) 

Matilda Barrier (Jno. B.) 

Eva L. Dry 

Marv C. Moose 



Elizabeth Barringer (-w'idoiv) 

Amelia Barrier 

Elizabeth Barrier 

Mary Barrier (^vidow) 

Matilda Barrier (G. B.) 

Julean L. Cope 

Eve L. Dry (deceased) 

Catherine Moose (George) 

Mary E. Moose 

Sophia Moose (D. Monro) 

Mary C. Moose 

Nancy M. Peck (J. L.) 

Milly' Shoe 

Sarah Shoe 

Elisabeth Shoe (deceased) 

Susannah Sides 

Mary Sides 



Luther H. Moose 

John W. Moose 

C. A. Moose 

John Moose (deceased) 

V. C. Lentz (certificate) 

A. W. Moose 

H. L. Moose 

Levi Shoe 

H. D. Barrier 

Henry Barrier 

Jacob Barrier 

J. W. Barrier 

C. T. Moose 

Daniel H. Blackwelder 

J. A. Peck 

J. A. Fisher 

W. A. Lyerle 

C. D. Fisher 

D. J. Fisher 

W. C. Barringer 

VV. G. H. Barringer 

D. W. Palmer 

Charles T. Ridenhour 

D. J. Rowland 

Wilie Shoe 

Moses Hurlocker (deceased) 

Caleb Barrier 

D. M. Barrier 

John Shoe 

W. C. Barrier 

W. H. Moody 

Daniel Fisher 

Joel Honeycutt 

D. W. Littles 



Lydia Sides 

Atlanta L. Sides (A. Sides) 

Sarah E. Lentz (V. C. Lentz) 

Sally E. Barrier 

Emmeline Barrier 

H. E. Moose (Green Moose) 

Sarah E. Blackwelder (certificate) 

Julean Barnhardt 

Lucinda J. Blackwelder 

Mary G. Moose 

Mariah Moose 

Elizabeth G. Blackwelder 

Catherine Barrier 

Caroline Fisher 

Amanda C. Troutman 

Margaret B. Fisher 

Sarah Troutman (deceased) 

Christina Fisher 

A. E. Peck 

M. E. Peck 

Frances Peck 

E. E. Lyerle 

Joice Sides 

M. L. Moody 

Elizabeth Fisher 

M. C. Blackwelder 

L. M. A. Fisher 

R. R. Lyerle 

Julian A. M. Fisher 

Leah Fisher 

M. C. Fisher 

M. V. Page 

Mary Page 

Bellzorah Page 

M. J. Lefler 

Nelen Barringer 

A. M. Green 

Jacob Barrier 

M. J. Lyerle 

E. Lyerle 

L. M. Palmer 



6 



M. J. Fisher 

F. A. Moody 

R. H. Sides 

R. C. Peck 

Mary M. Shoe (W. Shoe) 

Laura J. Ridenhour 

Joice E. Fisher 

Mary E. Moose (John F.) 

Julean C. Barrier 

E. F. Moose (L. H. Moose) 
C. S. Blackwekler (D. H. 

Blackwelder) 
Margaret Palmer (D. A. Palmer) 
Elizabeth Barrier (Wm. Barrier) 

F. R. L. Fisher 
Jennie L. A. Moody 
Martha J. Moose 
Ellen G. Fisher 

The war and time had evidently taken their toll of the men at this 
point in the church history. Many of the above named women were 
unmarried. Some who were married do not have the husband's name 
beside theirs, nor Mrs. to indicate their marital status. 

One wonders if variation in spelling given names as well as family 
names occurred with changes in record keepers. 

The following names of those wiio were members of the Evangelical 
Lutheran Church at Bear Creek are also of interest: 

First Roll 

Male Female 

John Ridenhour Elezabeth Barnhardt 

George Misenheimer Sophia Melcher 

Phillip Wagoner Ester Harkey 

Phillip Ridenhour Maria Moose 

Daniel Carker Katharine Peck 

Daniel Boger Magdaline Sides 

William Sides Elezabeth Peck 

Ruben Harkey Elezabeth Lyerle 

Tilmon Sell Paggey Moose 

Daniel Wagoner Mary Ann Fisher 

Daniel Fisher Amelia Barringer 

Henry J. Barringer Leah Fisher 



Clabon Lyerle 
Matthew Barringer 
Edmond Sell 
Jacob Lyerle 
Jacob Canoy 
Adam Ritchey 
David Lyerle 
Daniel Fesperman 
John Peck 
John Melcher 
Dawald Harkey 



Elezabeth Barringer 
Martha Sides 
Susannah Wagoner 
Elezabeth Misenheimer 
Martha Blackwelder 
Polley Ritchie 
Rebecca Barringer 
Elizabeth Ridenhour 
Ledia Boger 
Barbara Fisher 
Elizabeth Peck 
Leah Peck 
Sara Canoy 



October 23, 1836 these Lutheran Communicant members were listed: 



John Ridenhour Sc wife (2) 
John Barringer (1) 
George Misenheimer &: wife (2) 
Jacob Lyerly (1) 
Jacob Misenheimer &: wife (2) 
Mathias Barringer & wife (2) 
Philip Ridenhour & wife (2) 
Peter Peck & wife (2) 
Daniel Carker (1) 
David Link &: wife (2) 
Daniel Boger &: wife (2) 
Henry Barger & wife (1) 
Jacob Barger Sc wife (1) 
Henry J. Barringer (1) 
Edmond Sell (1) 
David Lyerle (1) 
Frederick Barger & wife (1) 
Mathias Barrier &; wife (2) 
John Moose & wife (1) 
Cleabon Lyerle (1) 
George Moose &: wife (1) 
Daniel Dry (1) 



Elezabeth Peck (1) 
Sophia Melcher (1) 
Elezabeth Barnhardt (1) 
Barbara Fisher (1) 
Christina Fesperman (1) 
Leah Fisher (1) 
Ledia Blackwelder (1) 
Amelia Barringer (1) 
Elezabeth Peck (1) 
Elezabeth Barringer (1) 
Liddia Barringer (1) 
Maria Fisher (1) 
Lea Sell (1) 
Rachel Sides (1) 
Elizabeth Lyerle (1) 
Ester Harkey (1) 
Daniel Fisher (1) 
Solomon Ritchy (1) 
Tilmon Sell (1) 
Charles Ritchy (I) 
Charles Frick & wife (2) 

Total 53 



Up until 1883 while the Lutherans and Reformeds worshipped 
together these family names were recorded: Lyerly, Seitz, Heynseman, 
Berger, Hahn, Barnhardt, Smith, Gregory, Heglar, Leib, Beck, Leofler, 



Bleiler, Reitenhour, Lauton, Aluse (Moose), Sides, Myers, Shoe, Miller, 
Plyler, Rendleman, Dry, AVagoner, Misenheimer, Stickleather, Brick- 
man, Arey, Harris, Louder, Peck, Shefer, Eudy, Fisher, Sells, Rieche 
(Ritchie), Melchor, Doud (Doup), Green, Frick, Shuneey, Barrier, 
Shandy, Carter, Gulp, Hanoy, Harkey, Link, Frances, Troutman, 
Peacock, Boger, Pery, Honeycutt, Stiers, \Valcher (AV'alker), Tyler, 
Biles, Weaver, Underwood, Earnhardt, Palmer, Hurlocker, Black- 
welder, Haythcock, Gorl, Rowland, Moody, Littles, Gope, Fesperman, 
Lentz. 

After 1883 new names began to appear. Ghildren of the congregation 
married and settled close to home. New families bought land and 
moved into the community. These names began to appear on the 
church roll: Hartman, Penninger, Gruse, Harwood (Har^vard), Almon, 
Bangle, Allman, Wyatt, Gox, Riser, Tucker, Sanders, Morris, Pickler, 
Gauble, Petrea, Layton, Hatley, Hopkins, Kendall, Love, Brose, Rine- 
hart. Tally, Whitley, Rich, Burleyson, Bost, Morgan, McDaniels, Hart- 
sell, Roberts, Hill, Blalock, Broome, Baker, Gline, Davis, Goodman, 
Isenhour, Poplin, Platte, Parker, Trexler, Wells, Ogburn, Barringer, 
Gaunady, Efird, Gardner, Poole, Safrit, Worrell, Dohme, Floyd, Hin- 
son, Necaise, Blair, Buckwell, Jandebeur, Humphrey, ^Vyant. 

SOCIAL ACTION IN EARLY YEARS 

This is 1974, only two years before the two hundredth birthday of 
our nation. Troublesome issues confront us in our political and social 
relationships. Since the beginning of time some of mankind has strug- 
gled to foster social justice and the brotherhood of man. In the course 
of human events love for our Greater and the desire for universal 
brotherhood has placed the realization of this dream at our fingertips, 
in this day and hour. In the name of The Golden Rule may we clutch 
it in the palm of our hand and vouch safe it for all time. 

In studying the history of our denomination we find that our church 
attempted to solve this issue which caused such strife and antagonism 
just prior to and during the years of The War Between The States. In 
an Historical Sketch of The Glassis of North Carolina by George Wm. 
^Velker, D.D. he wrote of a dark shadow falling on church members 
concerning Black People and slave holding. In 1838 delegates meeting 
in Lowerstone Ghurch resolved to provide room and pews for the Black 
People in their midst and receive them into the Gommunion. In 1845 
at a meeting of Glassis delegates complained more loudly about the 
evil treatment of slaves and set stiffer guidelines to more benefits for 
them. In the 1848 meeting of Glassis, Slavery became an issue of intense 
interest and bitterness. It was argued that many church folk held black 
slaves as well as bound, indigent white men, women and orphaned 
children. It was further argued that masters and mistresses of such 
slaves and servants should be held responsible for their religious train- 
ing and general welfare. In the judgment of Glassis the relationship of 



master and bound servant constituted them part of the same household 
and the master was obligated to discharge toward the servant the duty 
of head of the family, as to his own children. 

Our forebears have related to us by word of mouth the Bethel 
response to this issue. Many of them held bound black and white 
servants. Before this history is lost to this and future generations it 
should be recorded as sacred to the memory of masters and servants. 
Bethel opened her doors to blacks who chose to join. They worshipped 
together in harmony and mutual respect. During the Civil War they 
suffered together. Money was worthless at this time. At one time we 
are told the Classis had only thirty-five cents in good money in its 
treasury. 

About The War Of The Rebellion which fell within the fifty years 
of his review Dr. Welker has this to say: "As a matter of course the 
church suffered in those sad years in all her activities. Most of her 
active members were under arms, and too many, alas, found a grave 
away from the sacred precincts of the churches, where they had wor- 
shiped God. Unfortunately animosities grew out of it between portions 
of the Classis, and also those personal to individuals that produced 
wounds not yet heald. Classis steered clear, as a body, of all entangle- 
ments, and there is not a record on her pages that anyone need wish 
to erase. A memorial remains to her in a certificate entitling her to a 
Confederate Bond for $300, with some Confederate notes. This was all 
Col. Barnhardt had to show in his treasury at the collapse." 

After the war Masters were charged to let the blacks stay in their 
houses, if they wished. Many stayed and shared the fruit of their labor. 
As times improved many chose to move to towns and engage in public 
work. The Black People chose to form their churches where they made 
their homes. Soon they had all left the white churches. Some of the 
older ones wanted to be buried in their own cemetery in Bear Creek 
Community. We are told the last funeral was around 1945. 

Some of the Bethel Bear Creek Black members who were catechised 
and confirmed became preachers and ministered to their own folk. 
One Dan Moose became a preacher in Statesville, but came back 
occasionally to visit friends. 

In 1935, Sally Barnhardt, who lived in Concord, came back with 
the writer's father, Jacob O. Moose, Sr. on a special trip to the Barn- 
hardt Place. She wanted to stand one more time on the big rock step 
to The Big House. She was 100 years old, and on that rock she danced 
and sang Hallelujah in memory of happier times she had known. She 
told of hot tears and trembling arms at times of farewells and parting 
of the way. Bitter memories were intermingled with sweet recollections 
of happy relationships. 

Even tho we may not like to admit it, the issue of Black and White 
is still with us and sometimes reaches the boiling point. If only we 

10 



could realize that we need each other to survive in a common cause, 
and would reach out and join hands in Christian Brotherhood under 
God's plan, the battle would soon be won. Then we would see the 
sunrise of The Kingdom of God. 



CABARRUS GETS A NEW ROAD 
PLEAS AND QUARTER SESSIONS-JANUARY 1798 

Ordered by the Court that a new road shall be laved off from the 
Presbyterian Meeting House on the Pee Dee Road by Ephraim Harris', 
thence to the new road that leads from Cabarrus Court House to 
Fayetteville. 

Commissioners to lay off the road— E. D. Harris, John Barringer, 
Sr., John Barringer, Jr., John Berger. John Culp, George Culp, Mathias 
Barringer, George Barringer, Peter Kepley, Sr., Peter Kepley, Jr., Jacob 
Boshard, Henry Dolin, Samuel Gerner, Mathias Bernhard and Jacob 
Musgenung. 

The above bit of information was supplied by Miss Eugenia Lore 
of Concord, N. C, a well known historian and genealogist. Although 
it refers to a Presbyterian Meeting House Miss Lore says that the 
Reformeds were frequently referred to as Presbyterian. What makes 
it pertinent to our congregation is the importance of roads. Also names 
of some of the commissioners appointed to lay off the road were found 
in the old church records. Jacob Musgenung was the first Moose to 
settle in this vicinity. In part one of this book may be found land 
grants with his name. 

OLD FRIENDS PART COMPANY 

Lutherans and Reformeds worshiped together harmoniously for 
seventy years. When, in 1875, the need for a division became evident, 
the Lutherans moved about three miles east of Bethel Bear Creek and 
erected their building which they called New Bethel. The Reformed 
congregation continued to worship in the old church until a new 
building was erected in 1878. The record and deed of settlement 
(copies) are to be found later on herein. 

Plans were made and work begun on a new building in January, 
1878. It was completed and ready for dedication the fourth Sunday in 
October the same year. The Rev. J. W. Cecil preached the dedication 
sermon. Rev. R. F. Crooks was pastor and Daniel M. Moose was the 
leading spirit in erection of the building. This church was 36 ft. x 
48 ft. constructed from timber grown on the church land. It was com- 
modious and a credit to the community. 

In August 1888 this article was written in THE COLLEGE VISI- 
TOR by Dr. J. C. Clapp, president: 

11 



PROSPERED IN GIVING 

"A visit to Bethel Reformed congregation in Stanley County, N. C. 
after an absence of almost ten years reveals a most delightful and in- 
spiring state of progress and prosperity. The old delapidated union 
church has given place to a large, neat and comfortable house of wor- 
ship of their own. The membership has grown from a handful to a 
host. The Sunday School has sprung into full and vigorous life, large 
and well ordered. The community shares in the prosperity. Large barns 
supplant small stables. Elegant dwelling succede rude cabins. Well 
tilled and productive farms have grown out of almost barren fields. 
Progress and thrift are depicted on the countenances of the people and 
seen in their manners, dress, vehicles and teams. Doubtless no com- 
munity in the state has made greater progress during these stringent 
times. Many have actually retrograded. Naturalism may assign many 
causes for this happy change, or be able to find none at all. Christian 
faith recognizes it as the reward of liberal giving. The little band, in 
their poverty, freely gave time, labor, money, and their new, substantial 
church sprang up. They excelled every other congregation in the 
Classis of North Carolina in giving to Catawba College, and a mag- 
nificent new building stands forth. Their Sunday School takes the lead 
in giving to Missions and it prospers exceedingly. A large percent of 
its pupils are securing a liberal education preparatory to useful and 
honored lives. Their beloved pastor, Rev. C. B. Heller, leads in large 
benevolence, both by word and example, and the people nobly follow 
and they are greatly prospered." 

In the preceding article Dr. Clapp mentioned the Sunday School's 
contribution to Missions. The idea of a Missionary Sale, which was to 
become a high light in the life of the congregation, was conceived by 
Elder John F. Moose in 1880. The amount received from that sale was 
,^8.00. in 1906 it increased to $175.00. In 1973 more than ^^700.00 was 
realized. Daniel M. Moose cried the first sale and each year thereafter 
until just prior to his death in 1921. From then until the late 1950s 
John D. Moose, a grandson of Daniel, was auctioneer until his health 
failed. Since then Great grandsons of John F. Moose and Daniel Moose 
have shared the honor. 

Bethel owned land which was rented. A date was set after harvest to 
receive the rent at the church steps where it was auctioned off. It 
appears that members began to donate produce to add to this sale and 
thus the idea for a continuing Missionary Sale was born. It became a 
festive occasion with a program, usually featuring a speaker. These 
sales were forerunners of Church Suppers, Bazaars, Auctions and other 
plans for raising extra funds as well as providing social functions which 
are so essential to community life. 

Money was scarce in the old days. The church records show that 
ministers were paid through subscriptions to his salary. The average 
subscription appears to be fifty cents a year; many were five cents, 10 

m 



cents with occasional amounts of one or two dollars. The deacons eyes 
would pop when someone pledged the magnificent sum of five dollars. 
Talk about inflation! How about these salaries? 1857— $47.00— , an- 
nually; 1874 S71.50; 1878 S60.05; 1890 S105.00; 1895 .S141.00; 1899— 
$180.25. Where will it all end? They preached one Sunday a month. 

North Carolina Classis met at Bethel Bear Creek May 6, 1891. 

On September 24, 1904 the congregation appointed a committee to 
consider improvements to the church building. The committee was: 
J. A. Peck, W. A. Lyerly, D. W. Palmer, J. F. Moose, M. G. Lentz, 
D. M. Moose and Pastor W. W. Rowe. 

The church was enlarged, a tower built and a bell installed in 1906, 
during the pastorate of Rev. Rowe. W. A. Lyerly and Albert Shoe 
were the building committee. 

The Classis of North Carolina held its annual meeting in Bethel 
Bear Creek church May 8-13, 1906. After the above mentioned im- 
provements it seemed appropriate to re-dedicate the church at this 
meeting of the Synod. 

The Bear Creek folk were ever mindful of the comfort and con- 
venience of their visitors. May 1, 1906 issue of THE STANDARD 
carried this notice: "Brother John Hugh Moose writes THE STAND- 
ARD that arrangements have been made to have a locked mail box 
placed at the church during the meeting of Classis and that mail 
directed to Mt. Pleasant, RED #3 will reach the church about one 
o'clock each day and letters mailed at the church will reach Concord 
at 6:30 P.M. Fifteen years ago the brethren did not dream of such 
arrangement." 

CHURCH DISCIPLINE 

The early settlers had an interesting svstem of government. Being 
more or less isolated politics and government were centered around 
the Meeting House. Public meetings were called to handle issues of the 
day. The Meeting had to approve all the actions of its members. 
Anyone who got out of line and strayed from the straight and narrow 
path was expected to confess his sins and promise to do better in the 
future. In those days the church was about the only contact -with 
society and those out of favor or irregular in attendance had a rather 
lonely life. In many instances the Meeting House was the Court House. 
This practice was exercised more or less up to 1900. It is noted from 
our own church records of the late 1800s that during Preparatory 
Service for Communion, to be held the Simday following, the Pastor 
or an Elder would inquire if any member had broken a commandment 
and should be barred from Communion. 

The Church Council held trials for misconduct. If found guilty as 
charged the sinner was penalized according to the gravity of the charge. 

13 



Penalties ranged from suspension for designated period of time to 
outright expulsion from membership. A confession and promise to do 
better could restore one to good graces. This practice finally played 
out when victims began to tell the judges where to go. 

BETHEL BECOMES PART OF A CHARGE 

According to consistory records Bethel (Bear Creek) was a joint charge 
with Grace Lowerstone from 1884-1902. The joint consistory included: 
Elders from Lowerstone— Issam Weaver, Christenbury Holshouser, 
J. W. Foil and Solomon Peeler; from Bethel— J. F. Moose and D. Mon- 
roe Moose. Deacons from Lowerstone were: J. G. Kluttz, George Kluttz, 
D. H. Boger and D. A. Beaver; from Bethel— W. A. Moody and John 
L. Peck. 

In 1902 Ursinus, Rockwell was added to the charge with their Elders 
and Deacons: George Peeler, D. B. Fesperman and J. R. Holshouser. 
All the while this was called East Rowan Charge. 

In 1906 another change occurred. Bethel (Bear Creek), St. James 
Mount Pleasant and Boger (organized in 1905) were constituted a 
charge known as Bear Creek Charge. This union was to endure for 
many years. 

NOTED SONS OF BETHEL 

Bethel is proud of the five sons it has given the Christian Ministry: 
C. Columbus Wagoner was ordained July 17, 1910; Jacob A. Palmer 
was ordained June 1, 1913; Felix B. Peck was ordained June 12, 1922. 
Of the three Dr. Peck survives and at this writing is still active as a 
supply, having retired from full time ministerial duties several years 
ago. 

While these older men were serving in the denomination of their 
families and early upbringing two young men went into Christian 
Service through other channels. Rev. R. W. Allman has been preaching 
since 1940, and has been pastor of five different Free Will Baptist 
congregations. Rev. Lester Allman was ordained into the Conference 
of Evangelical Methodist Church in 1945, having begun his ministry 
at Rutherford College, North Carolina, while studying for admittance 
to the Conference. These men who are dedicated to Christian Service 
express gratitude for the early training they received at Bethel. Lester 
made special mention of his Sunday School Teachers, Rev. Warlick 
and others who helped mold his life. 

SOCIAL LIFE IN THE CHURCH 

Around the early 1900s Sunday School Conventions were popular, 
and along with Singings drew large crowds and offered diversion for 

14 



Sunday afternoons. Annual Sunday School picnics, often held at some- 
one's farms were also social highlights of the church year. Games for 
all ages, good fellowship and well filled baskets lingered in memories 
for many years. As travel became easier and public swimming pools 
became available, picnic sites moved to poolside and s"\\'imming was 
added to the sports. For the past few years Bethel has held its picnic 
on the church grounds and revived many of the old-fashioned games. 

GROWTH AND EXPANSION 

Churches outgrow their facilities and new buildings are needed. At 
the close of the Prej^arator) Service September 12, 1926, a congregation- 
al meeting was called to explore the possibility of building a new 
church. Rev. C. ^V. Warlick, J. T\^ade Moose and |. A. Ro^vland very 
forcefidly exj^ressed their ^vish for a ne^\' building. The congregation 
ga\e the consistor)' power to appoint a committee to can\ass members 
for subscriptions to a building fund. October 24, 1926 another congre- 
gational meeting was held related to building. On November 4, 1926, 
congregation voted to give trustees authority to cut timber from church 
land and sell it, proceeds to go into the New Church Building Fund. A 
second motion was made and carried that the trustees be given privilege 
to appoint a committee to select location for the church and a ^vell. 
Appointed to this committee were: W. A. Lyerly, chm., A. J. Harwood, 
}. A. Peck, A. M. Penninger and H. T Almond. M. G. Lentz, trustee, 
announced that cutting of timber ■would begin November 29, 1926. 

August 30, 1927, in congregational meeting a committee was ap- 
pointed to investigate price of brick and advisabilitv of purchase: 
J. Wade Moose, chm., J. A. Rowland and Malcolm Palmer. 

November 20, Mr. Palmer reported brick had been purchased, other 
churches had been looked at, plans and specifications had been studied. 
He recommended that a new committee be appointed to secure services 
of an architect and to have buildine plans and specifications executed. 
The present committee was retained by vote. 

August 26, 1928, the ne^v church is under construction. Plans Avere 
made to lay cornerstone at Harvest Home Service. 

On the same date Classis' rule to elect pastors for a min.imum of 
three years with a minimum salary of $3,000 annually, was not favored 
by the consistory. . ■ • 

Januar)- 27, 1929, the first services -were held in the ne-^v chmxh. Sun- 
day School at 9:45, conducted by Adolphiis CrooVs Lentz. 11:00 o'clock 
worship conducted bv the pastor. Rev. C. W. "^.Varlick. 

The foregoing items were excerpts from minutes of consistory. 

May 4, 1930, the new church was dedicated. Services were conducted 
by two sons of the congregation. Revs. C. C. Wagoner and J. A. Palmer, 
assisted by the pastor. Rev. C. W. Warlick. 

15 



Synod was to meet at Bethel the next day and Holy Communion was 
to be celebrated Tuesday at 9:00 A.M. Synod convened in the new 
Bethel (Bear Creek) Church May 5, 6, 7, 1930. 

According to a story told by Mr. Dolph Lentz the location of a well 
mentioned in connection with site for new church building was an 
important feature of the building program. Up to this time a Spring 
Iiad been the source of water for church goers. Every Sunday, or at any 
time services were held, a pitcher of cool, refreshing water was placed 
in a spot convenient to the preacher. In those days long sermons were 
in vogue and the speaker needed a drink of water often. Rev. Warlick 
was particularly fond of the spring water. We are told the spring is 
still in existence after all these years. It can be found across from the 
church near the parsonage. 

Following is part of an article written by Mr. George H. Moose for 
the REFORMED CHURCH STANDARD, VOL. XXXVII, NUM- 
BER 9, OCTOBER 15, 1930. 

"Preliminary plans for this church began being made in September 
1926, and in November of the same year work began by cutting timber 
to secure funds to be used in the erection of a church. This work of 
cutting timber, from the church lands, and of securing pledges for this 
specific purpose continued in the spring of 1927. 

The first tree was cut by Mr. Green Sides and John F. Moose, both 
being over eighty years of age. It is also a fact to be recalled that these 
two men helped to cut and haul the first logs used in the former 
church building more than fifty years earlier. The cutting of timber 
to be used in the building was finished in March, 1928, using about 
100,000 feet. About March 15, 1928, a contract was let for the 
erection of a building to J. H. Boysworth of Norwood, N. C. Mr. 
Louis H. Asbury of Charlotte. N. C. was the architect who drew 
the plans. J. Wade Moose, J. A. Rowland and M. M. Palmer were 
selected as the building committee; the first named or chairman, laying 
the first brick; M. G. Lentz, trustee of church was treasurer. Brick was 
purchased and hauled from Yadkin brick yards, a distance of 17 miles; 
this being quite a task as 182,000 brick were used. This began in Octo- 
ber, 1927. The price was $8.00 per M. for common and $13.50 for face 
brick. 

Work on erection of building began in May, 1928, and was com- 
pleted in December of same year. The cornerstone was placed the 
second Sunday of October, 1928. This stone was prepared and donated 
by the Palmer Stone Works of Albemarle, N. C. The tin box placed in 
the corner was made and donated by Mr. F. C. Niblock of Concord, 
N. C. Rev. C. W. Warlick, pastor at the time, had charge of laying 
same. More than twenty tons of crushed stone used in foundation and 
basement were donated by Mr. Fletcher, superintendent of Yadkin 
R R, and were hauled from Gold Hill, a distance of nine miles. The 
cut stone, used in walls and for coping etc., was hauled from a quarry 

16 



in Rowan County, a distance of 17 miles and cost $1,400.44. The cost 
of brick at kiln was $1,720.36. Total estimated value of donated or free 
labor $6,850. Total cost in money was $18,142.92. Grand Total 
$24,992.92. All material used in the erection of the church was placed 
on the ground by members and friends free, but value included in 
above figures. These are very ordinary working people, not rich, or 
even in more than ordinary financial circumstances, but this church 
was built and furnished without a dollar of debt, and the people are 
justly proud of it." 

We Avould beg to differ ^vith Mr. Moose and say these are rather 
unusual people and rich beyond measure. At the beginning of his 
article he gave dimensions of new edifice but as it was in comparison 
to descriptions of earlier churches already mentioned, w'e continue his 
article here omitting description of early churches. 

"The present building, which was just dedicated May 4, 1930, is 
built of stone and brick, is: Auditorium 65 ft. x 38 ft., while the Sunday 
School section is two stories and basement, with kitchen and rooms for 
heating plant under the auditorium. This cross section is 30 feet by 50 
feet and contains seven large, well lighted school rooms. There are two 
rooms in front of main building, with folding doors which are easily 
opened as a part of the auditorium." 



ORGANIZATIONS AT WORK 

The Bethel congregation has been active in all phases of Synodical 
work. The Women's Missionary Society of North Carolina Classis w^as 
the first organization to be formed. The organizational meeting was 
held at Mt. Hope Church, Guilford County, May 6, 1897, according to 
Dr. Leonard's History of Southern Synod. Bethel was represented 
there. 

The Missionary Society immediately sponsored The Mission Band 
for training children in local churches. THE OUTLOOK OF AHS- 
SIONS, which carried news of the mission fields and program materials 
was a publication familiar to most homes. 

Support of foreign missions was promoted and close relationship 
maintained with the missionaries. In 1924 the WMS organized The 
Girls' Missionary Guild. The ^V^MS loyally supported Catawba College 
and Nazareth Children's Home. With completion of merger of Re- 
formed and Evangelical Churches in 1934 the name of women's organi- 
zation became The Women's Guild instead of W.M.S. The Church 
name also changed to Evangelical and Reformed. 

Bethel has supplied leadership in high places in Guild work. 

The men of Bethel joined The Churchmen's Brotherhood when it 
was organized in 1945. They were active in all Brotherhood projects 
and have furnished officers beyond the local level. 

17 



Another merger in 1966 changed the organizations to Fellowships 
rather than Guild and Brotherhood. This merger, with The Congre- 
gational Christian Church, also changed the name of the denomination 
to UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST. 

The church continues to have an active Sunday School as well as 
Fellowships for Men, Women and Youth. There are also choir groups 
and a Scout Troop which was re-activated in 1963. The church owes 
much to these organizations which give the training so vital to spiritual 
growth and development of good citizens. 

In 1950 THE BEAR CREEK GRANGE (many of whose members 
belong to Bethel Church) sponsored erection of a Community Build- 
ing. This has been of outstanding benefit to the church as well as 
community. It is used for meetings, public suppers, private parties (by 
making suitable arrangements) the Missionary Sale, and is also the 
home of Scout Troop 110. 

Mr. George H. Moose donated the land on which the building was 
erected. Grange members, and interested friends, furnished and hauled 
the logs. Mr. Floyd B. Moose did the sawing. The Building is deeded 
to Community Center and is operated by a Board of Trustees. 

OUR YOUTH, THE HOPE OF THE FUTURE 

1939 saw all previous programs for children of the church combined 
under one heading. Youth Fellowship. For awhile there were two 
groups Jr. and Sr. They had good years and times when attendance 
was low and interest at a low ebb. For the most part the efforts on 
part of young people and leaders have been rewarding. 

In 1963 Youth Fellowship became Youth Ministry and seemed to 
develop new spirit. The Youth are represented on the consistory by 
one boy and one girl. 

Their activities show that our sons and daughters are responsive and 
responsible to Christian development. Their experiences in church 
programs, especially at Christmas and Easter, along with maintenance 
projects for the church are remarkable. They sponsor programs and 
fund raising projects to finance their plans. They derive much benefit 
from their social and recreational activities. The overall program is 
preparing them for adult church membership when they will be in 
the driver's seat. Much credit goes to the adult counsellors and leaders. 
It adds blessed hope to a bright future for the church in these changing 
times. 

BOY SCOUT TROOP 110 

Boy Scouts of America is an honored organization. It has long been 
recognized as next to the church in character building and for turning 
boys into men. 

18 



Bethel has been involved with scouting since 1951 when the first 
charter was received. Ralph Platte was the first Scout Master. Appar- 
entlv the program was discontinued for a time, as we note in consistory 
minutes it was re-activated in 1963. The second charter was received 
March 31, 1963. 

The following men (in addition to Mr. Platte) have given their time 
to serve as Scout Masters: Johnny Furr, Sidnev Hartsell, Leonard 
AX'orrell, ^\'illard Moose ancl Kenneth Keasler. The Advisory Com- 
mittee presently serving is composed of the following: Rev. Henry J. 
Meier, Institutional Representative; Kenneth Keasler, Scout Master; 
Jack Kendall, assistant Scout Master; Willard Moose, Joe Moose and 
Sidnev Hartsell, Committeemen. 

Six young men have attained the rank of Eagle Scout; Johnny 
Hartsell, Gregory Honeyciitt. Gerald Moose, Charles Penninger, jack 
Kendall, Anthony Hartsell. Johnny Hartsell and Gregory Honeycutt 
also attained the God and Countrv award. 

At a Court Of Honor held in July, 1974, sixty-nine merit badges 
were awarded. 

On Sunday P.M. July 17, 1966, in an impressive ceremony, Scout 
Troop 110 and the Bruner Hurlocker family presented Flag Poles to 
Camp Earnhardt in Mem_ory of Meridith Hurlocker. 

The Scouts meet weekly in the Community Building. 

DAILY VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL 

For many years Bethel has held a week of Vacation Bible School, 
following soon after close of public school. This supplements the 
Sunday School training and offers the children a more diversified 
program of recreation, arts and crafts and social activity than is pos- 
sible in one hour a week. This program usually closes with a picnic for 
the children provided by interested parents and other adults. The 
work of the children is displayed. Frequently they present a program 
for the congregation. 

BETHEL LIFTS A VOICE IN SONG 

There has always been much musical talent among the Bethel 
members. Mr. V. C. Lentz was one of the early singing leaders and 
probably inspired others. In more recent years a well organized choir, 
with Mrs. Holly Lentz and Miss Verna Lentz as leaders and musicians, 
has lead the congregational singing as well as rendering special se- 
lections that are not to be excelled by amatem- choirs. 

Mrs. Forrest Moose is Sunday School pianist. Each Sunday the School 
session is opened by Mrs. Ralph Fisher plaving a selection on the Reed 
Organ which was the first church organ in the area. It has been re- 
stored within the past few years and placed in the sanctuary. 

19 



BETHEL BECOMES A ONE CHURCH CHARGE 

In a Congregational Meeting on December 20, 1953 it was resolved 
to petition the joint consistory to request Southern Synod to divide the 
Bear Creek Charge, leaving only Bethel as a charge and making an- 
other charge of St. James and Boger. Mr. Luther Barringer made the 
motion that Bethel go self-supporting. Southern Synod approved the 
request. 

That action brought the need for a new building project in the form 
of a parsonage. That undertaking and completion of it is described in 
an atricle to'^THE STANDARD, February 15, 1955, written by Mrs. 
M. I. Cline. 

'The members of Bethel Church near Mt. Pleasant voted at a Con- 
gregational Meeting held on Saturday, January 9, 1954, to build a 
parsonage, having voted a few weeks earlier to withdraw from Mt. 
Pleasant and Boger churches which had composed the Bear Creek 
Charge. The parsonage was begun in the early Spring of 1954 and 
completed the last of July. 

It is a nine room brick veneer structure just across the road from the 
church. It contains a living room, dining room, kitchen, two bed 
rooms, bath and study on the first floor. The study is finished in pine 
panelling and has a private entrance. There are two bedrooms, bath 
and children's living room on the second floor. There is a full base- 
ment which houses a warm air heating system, laundry, car and space 
for play. 

The cost was above $15,000. The church, owning 100 acres of timber, 
was able to furnish all framing for the house and sold $4,000 worth of 
timber. The building committee was composed of Luther Barringer, 
Chairman, J. Forrest Moose and John A. Rowland. These men worked 
long and hard. One of them being present while the work was being 
done. The finance committee was composed of Miss Verna Lentz, 
Chairman, Ray Barrier, Ray Moose, Mrs. Ralph Lowder and Mrs. 
Charlie Hurlocker, with Ray Moose serving as Treasurer. This com- 
mittee worked very hard, with the parsonage now being debt free. All 
this work was accomplished while the church was without a regular 
pastor. 

The Women's Guild bought Venetian blinds throughout for the 
parsonage and the men of the church bought a freezer locker for the 
basement. Shrubbery has been set out and the lawn seeded by the 
church members. 

August 1, 1954, Rev. Merle Sollinger from Newcastle, Pa. moved in, 
taking up his work September 1. He and Mrs. Sollinger have two sons, 
Merle Jr., 16 and Tommy 6. Mrs. Sollinger is the former Miss Elma 
Holland of Dunn, N. C. 

October 10, Open House was held in the afternoon and a large crowd 
of member and friends called." 

20 



Other items of interest included in this same news letter were: "The 
church was saddened by the recent deaths of three of its members, Mrs. 
Reuben Blackwelder, Mrs. A. M. Penninger and Mrs. John A. Row- 
land. They were faithful members of the Women's Guild, Mrs. Row- 
land having been a member for more than fifty years. 

Our Sunday School superintendent for this year is Lester Moose 
with Miss Phyllis Marbry as secretary and treasurer. 

The Youth Fellowship had charge of the morning service the 5th 
Sunday in January. This group has recently brought a mimeograph 
machine for the use of the church. 

The pastor. Rev. Sollinger, is training a large confirmation class 
during the Sunday School hour each Sunday morning. 

A number of our young people and children are working on posters 
for the annual Stewardship contest." 

BETHEL MEMBERS NEVER IDLE 

Completion of major building projects did not bring relaxation of 
endeavor on the part of Bethel members. With the Community Build- 
ing available for social activities the church basement was converted 
into classrooms for the growing Sunday School. From time to time 
other improvements have been made to the church plant. Modernizing 
rest room facilities, carpeting and painting sanctuary, improving ceme- 
tery and general upkeep keep hands and wallets busy. Beautification 
of the sanctuary was greatly enhanced by installation of new light 
fixtures. The choir members also improved their room. Memorial gifts 
as well as willing workers have done much through the years. 

Bethel members are also civic minded, always ready to contribute to 
and help solicit funds for various drives such as Community Chest, 
Cancer and Heart Funds, also Mount Pleasant Volunteer Fire Depart- 
ment. Some of members serve as Firemen, also as members of Firemen's 
Auxiliary. 

A real gesture of Love and Christian concern was JACKIE BOST 
DAY. This started as a dinner in which the public was invited to 
participate. After a few years it became an occasion for a Love Gift 
among the members. Jackie, son of Mr. and Mrs. G. L. (Jack) Bost, 
was stricken with polio in September 1954, shortly after his eighth 
birthday and a few weeks after entering third grade in school. After 
three years in hospitals he was able to return home. Now, after years 
of love and care from his family, especially devoted parents, and 
friends, he is a young man of twenty-eight whose cheeriness and happy 
expression are an inspiration to all who know him. By means of private 
tutoring he was able to finish High School with his Class. With an 
educated toe on his left foot, the only unparalyzed extremity, Jackie 
has learned to write, type, draw pictures, answer telephone, operate 

21 



T.V. by remote control, operate his radios and play an electronic 
organ. On occasion at church he has played taped recordings he has 
made of hymns. At one time he had a telephone answering service, 
but due to a scarcity ot customers in this area it did not prove profit- 
able. When a motorized wheel chair made outdoor activity possible 
he began to raise puppies. He has an air-conditioned van to accom- 
modate the wheel chair and it is usually parked in front of church 
when Sunday rolls around. 

One story told by Jackie's Mother begs to be included here: "One 
night shortly after his return home after three years in hospitals Jackie 
was put to bed with his respirator. After he was all tucked in his Father 
spoke to him. Receiving no reply he assumed the little fellow had 
fallen asleep immediately. In a few minutes Jackie spoke. Asked why 
he hadn t answered before he replied that he was saying his prayer. 
Feeling great concern tor his son s affliction the Father told him he 
must not be disappointed if God answered No just as human fathers 
do sometimes when children ask for things. Jackie replied, 'I wasn't 
asking for anything, I have all I need. 1 was just thanking Him for 
all I nave.' " 

"And a little child shall lead them" Isaiah 11:6 



BETHEL CONFERS HONORS 

May 11, 1952, in agreement with a motion made by Earl Moose 
before the congregation it was decided to bestow upon these men the 
honor and title ot Elder Emeritus: A. C. Lentz, George H. Moose, J. A. 
Rowland, W. R. Shue, J. W. Moose and A. J. Harwood. These Loyal 
members had passed the three-score and ten milestone along life's 
journey, had served their church one or more terms as Elder and, as 
expressed by Mr. Moose, much of Bethel's progress was due to their 
untiring labors. 

January 8, 1956 J. Forrest Moose made a motion in consistory meet- 
ing that Mr. A. Farrell Moose be honored with title of Elder Emeritus 
for same reasons as in above action. 1 he motion carried and Mr. Farrell 
Moose joined the ranks of Elders Emeritus. 

March 25, 1973 the consistory voted to name Rev. Charlie Hiatt 
Pastor Emeritus. On September 16, 1973 at a special evening service 
Rev. Hiatt was formally installed as Pastor Emeritus, was presented a 
plaque and honored at a reception in the community building. Sur- 
rounding churches were invited to share in the occasion. 

On August 18, 1974 in a special session of Council, or Consistory, the 
honor and title of Elder Emeritus was bestowed upon Mr. Floyd B. 
Moose and Miss Verna Lentz. 

22 



MINUTES ARE FOR READING 

Most of the information contained in the preceding pages can be 
found in minutes of consistory meetings throughout the years. Follow- 
ing are a few items that might be of special interest: 

November 15, 1954— Budget for 1955 was set at $6,300 

December 13, 1959— Consistory was granted authority to build Sunday 
School rooms in church basement 

November 20, 1960— North Carolina Grange gave Bethel the distin- 
guished award of CHURCH OF THE YEAR 

February 24, 1963— Consistory authorized church to reactivate Boy 
Scout Troop #110 

September 5, 1965— Delegates were appointed to attend the organiza- 
tion meeting Southern Conference of United Church Of Christ at 
Elon College, Sept. 30, 1965 

October 19, 1965— A proposed budget was adopted in amount of 
$10,169 

January 16, 1966— Consistory instructed Trustee Jack Bost to check 
whether or not original deeds to church property were recorded and 
to draw a new map for cemetery. 

February 6, 1966— W. B. Barrier reported on insurance carried on 
church property. Consistory ordered insurance changed to $70,000 
on church, $10,000 on contents, $25,000 General Liability, $16,000 
on parsonage 

June 12, 1966— Consistory instructed Tommy Kendall to send church 
papers to our members in Service, College Students and Elderly 
Members 

October 8, 1967— A proposed budget of $11,250 was adopted for 1968 

January 21, 1968— Consistory voted to continue publication of Bethel 
Bearer on a permanent basis 

November 1973— A proposed budget of $14,285 for 1974 was increased 
by $300 mileage allowance for Pastor's car, on a vote from the 
congregation. 

Other action by the consistory included appointment of an Evan- 
gelism Committee to programme Annual Preaching Missions to be 
held four Sunday Nights in September, with guest preachers. Another 
project which is approved on an annual basis is for the Youth Ministry 
to conduct a Trick or Treat benefit for UNTCEF. 

Note: The church records have been microfilmed and are stored in 
N. C. Archives of History, Raleigh, N. C. 

23 



BUFFALO AND BEAR CREEK INDUSTRY 

In the early days most families were independent and self sustaining. 
They built their own homes and barns, made their own clothes and 
shoes. Farming was the main industry, providing food for the family 
and livestock. Gradually, as more people came, more industry came 
with them. This community was more versatile than some. There were 
blacksmith, sawyers, tanners, harness and saddle makers, stone cutters, 
brick masons, carpenters, coopers, cobblers, hunters and trappers, gold- 
miners, craftsmen who fashioned furniture and made coffins. There 
was also a washboard factory. There was one Government distillery in 
the community. There were occasions when one could see smoke rising 
above the trees down by the creek and one wondered if Uncle Sam 
were getting some unlicensed assistance. Several water-powered grist 
mills were along the creeks. Always there would be General Country 
Stores around. Enterprise was free and competition was welcome. 

Not only were the men occupied at home. We find many of them 
serving as State Legislators, Magistrates, Sheriffs, Registrars, Preachers, 
Teachers, Bankers, and in many other fields. They served on various 
governing boards for institutions such as the church, colleges, orphan- 
ages and local school boards. 

We must not forget the heroic part the pioneer women had in 
building this great country. They worked side by side with their hus- 
bands in clearing land and building homes. They raised the families 
and spent long hours spinning, weaving and making clothes for the 
families. For a long while the average woman was more or less in the 
background. Today we find her in public work and many places of 
leadership. Whether in background or to front the women are a 
moving force in a nation's development. 

MILITARY SERVICE RECORDS 

Any attempt to list names of those who have rendered military 
service throughout the years of our church history would be too subject 
to error. However, any one wishing to see such records may go to the 
Public Libraries in Cabarrus, Stanly and Rowan Counties. 

These books will be helpful: 

A History of Cabarrus County In The Wars - 
Published by The War Records Committee 
Sponsored by Cabarrus County 

Contents: World War II Casualties 
World War II Veterans 

World War I Casualties 
World War I Veterans 

Spanish American War Co. L. 
24 



War Between The States Soldiers 
^Var of 1812 Soldiers 
Revolutionary "War Soldiers 



North Carolina Troops 1861-1865 A Roster 
Compiled by Luis H. Manarin 
Raleig-h, North Carolina 
State Department of Archives and History 

Vol. I Artillery 

Vol. II Cavalrv 

Vol. Ill Infantry 

Vol. I\^ Infantry by "Weymouth T. Jordan Jr. 
unit of histories bv Manarin 

Contents of above book list Regiments and Battalions 



MEMORIALS 

Bethel Bear Creek Church, like all institutions of long existence, 
has a record of many memorial contributions showing love, honor and 
appreciation to our forebears who made this history and whose resting 
places are sacred to us. The Church itself and these records are held 
in sacred trust to the honor of our God, our Country and our Homes. 

There are many physical evidences of memorials: grave stones, 
stained glass windows, furnishings of various kinds for Sanctuarv and 
Church School Department, all designed to add comfort and beautv as 
well as dignity to the ^Vorship Service. It would probably take another 
book to record them. Let it suffice that you have been moved to make 
the gifts and thev have been recorded. May it bring peace to your 
hearts. May this history and the part we have played in it be equal to 
markers of stone on the pages of time. 

Copies of this book may be ordered while they last. 

To descendants and friends of those who worshipped here and are 
buried in these hallowed grounds: if you wish to help maintain the 
cemetery and thereby preserve the last resting place of loved ones, you 
may send Memorials or contribiuions to Bethel, (Bear Creek) United 
Church of Christ. 

Route 1, Box 323 

Mount Pleasant. N. C. 28124 



CHURCH ROLL OF BETHEL, (BEAR CREEK), 

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST, REFORMED 

BRANCH, AS OF 1974 

* husband or wife, non member 
** child, non member 
( ) deceased spouse, if survivor not re-married 



Allmon, Danny 
Mrs. Rhonda Huff Allmon 
**Amber Nicole 

Earnhardt, Mrs. Frances Moose 
*Michael Vincent Earnhardt 
**Michael 
**Jeffrey 
**Mark 

Earrier, Eanks 

Mrs. Helen Fisher Earrier 

Kathy 

Lamar 

Earrier, Hubert 

Mrs. Mildred Holshouser Earrier 

Hubert Devon 
Earrier, Ray 

Mrs. Elma Moose Earrier 
Earringer, Mrs. Carrie Parker 

(Titus Earringer) 
Earringer, Mrs. Mary Elackwell 

(Charlie Earringer) 
Eergeron, Richard 
Mrs. Gail Whitley Eergeron 

**Richard Victor II 

**Patrick Whitley 

**Andre Eugene 
Eerrier, Mark 
Mrs. Susan Worrell Eerrier 
Elackwelder, Eobby 
Elair, Eeverly 
Blair, Hugh Jr. (Billy) 
Eoger, Mrs. Lynda Moose 
*Howard Lee Eoger 

**lerri L. Lentz Eoger 

**Amy Leigh Eoger 
Best, G. L. (Jack) 
Mrs. Lilly Shue Best 
Jackie 



Eost, Herman 
Mrs. Nancy E. Eost 

**Nancy Elizabeth 

**Sherri Lynn 

Eratton, Mrs. Lenita Penninger 
*Eric Eratton 

Buckwell, Jimmy 

Mrs. Cynthia Worrell Buckwell 

**Kenny 
**Douglas Allen 

Eurleyson, Donald 

Mrs. Donna K. Gibson Eurleyson 

**Jody 

**Donald Jr. 

Eurleyson, Hugh 
Mrs. Doletta Herrin Eurleyson 
Richard Dale 

Lyle 
Steve 

Eurleyson, S. H. 

(Verona Morton Eurleyson) 

Eurleyson, Tommy 

Mrs. Pamela King Eurleyson 

Burris, Mrs. Sylvia Trexler 
*Craven Burris 
**Dawn 

Carriker, Mrs. Mary Lowder 
*Clyde Carriker 

Cline, Donald 

Mrs. Vikki Creed Cline 

Cline, Mack Ivey 
Mrs. Mary Anna Lentz Cline 
Cranford, Ralph Herman 
Mrs. Peggy Shoe Cranford 
Aaron 

Fisher, Ralph 

Mrs. Mary Safrit Fisher 



26 



Floyd, Mrs. Betty Blackwelder 
*Marshall Blackwelder 

Furr, Mrs. Phyllis Marbry 
*Cornelius Furr 

Goodman, \'. A. 

Mrs. Mamie Canupp Goodman 

Goodman, \'an E. 

Mrs. Marsha Dunn Goodman 

Green, April 

Green, Joe 

Mrs. Adeline Jones Green 

Harke\, Mrs. Aggie Shiie 
(Eli Harkey) 

Hartsell, Sidnev John 

Mrs. Ruby Barringer Hartsell 

Anthony 

John Jr. 

Har\sood, Mrs. Cora Belle 
Barrier 

(John D. Har^vood) 

Harwood, Lucille 

Harwood, Martha 

Hiatt, Charles 

Mrs. Diane Hartsell Hiatt 

**Beverly Elaine 

**Phyllis Denise 

Honeycutt, Mrs. Irene Eudy 
(Keith Honeycutt) 

Humphrey, Mrs. Martha Rich 

*Mike Humphrey 
Huneycutt, Ellis 
Mrs. Annie Mae Barringer 
Hune)cutt 

Larrv 
**Ricky Allen 
Robin 

Hurlocker, Alvin 
Mrs. Shirley Barnhardt 

Hurlocker 

**Brenda Elaine 

**David Allen 

**Timothy Ray 

Hurlocker, Barney N. 

Mrs. Arlene Sifford Hurlocker 



Hurlocker, Bruner 

Mrs. Ida Mae Drye Hurlocker 

Hurlocker, Charlie 

Mrs. Nora Shipton Hurlocker 

Hurlocker, Cletus 

Mrs. Faye Fury Hurlocker 

**Lisa Anne 

**Loretta Kay 

Hurlocker, Mrs. Eltha Hahn 
(John C>rooks Hurlocker) 
Jandebein-, Mrs. Brenda Barrier 

*Ronnel Jandebeur 
Keasler, Kenneth 
Mrs. Betty Foe Keasler 
Kendall, Lane 

*Mrs. Judy Stirewalt Kendall 
Kendall, Tommv Hugh 
Mrs. Marv Smith Kendall 
Jack ■ 

Lentz, Clara 

Lentz, Hollv Moose 

Mrs. Bessie Allman Lentz 

Lentz, \'erna 

Little, Mrs. Grace Penninger 

(E. Pharo Little) 
Little, Michael 
Love, Dwight 
Mrs. Zelma Ford Love 
**Barbara 

Dale 

Jeffrey 

Joyce 

Nancy 

Lo^vder, Mrs. Emma Gray 
(James Lowder) 

Lowder, Jeris 

'''Mrs. Maria Chapman Lowder 
**Marcia 

LoHvder, Ralph 

Mrs. Gertie Hurlocker Lowder 
Lois 

Lyerlv, Mrs. Helen Lentz 
(Rev. William C. Lyerly) 



97 



Meador, Mrs. Marie Huneycutt 
*Marvin Meador 

**Stacey (daughter) 

Meier, Daniel P. 

Meier, Henry J. (Pastor) 
Mrs. Ruth Snitker Meier 

Moose, Aaron Willard 
Mrs. Varah Drye Moose 
Deborah (Debbie) 

**Melissa 

Moose, Archie E. 

Moose, Banks 

Mrs. Mamie Hurlocker Moose 

Moose, Floyd Barrier 
(Jennie Hahn Moose) 

Moose, Harold 

Mrs. Ruth Hill Moose 

Edward Stephen 

Reba 

Moose, Hoy 

Moose, Joe B. 
Mrs. Eloise Ketner Moose 
**Barry Stephen 
Sherry 

Moose, Leonard 

Mrs. Georgia Wise Moose 

**Amy Christine 

**Leonard Scott 

Moose, Lester 
Mrs. Nancy Hatley Moose 
**David 

Moose, Mrs. Mary Alice Kluttz 

(J. Forrest Moose) 
Moose, Melvin 
Mrs. Barbara Keasler Moose 

Gerald 

Raymond 
Morton, Mrs. Christine 

Blackwelder -'^• 

Palmer, Claude 
*Mrs. Callie Miller Palmer 
Penninger, Lester 
Mrs. Jean Fisher Penninger 

Charles 

Pamela Ann 



Penninger, Murray 

Mrs. Racie Hendrix Penninger 

Penninger, Mrs. Nellie 
Barnhardt 

(Banks Penninger) 

Penninger, William Luther 
Mrs. Evelyn Barrier Penninger 
Willa Leslie 

Petrea, Holly 

Petrea, Lee 

Mrs. Mary Shue Petrea 

Petrea, Richard 

Mrs. Kaye Cozart Petrea 

Petrea, R. William 

Platte, Ralph 

(Edith Penninger Platte) 

Plowman, Mrs. Frances 
Blackwelder 

*Donald Plowman 
**Donald Jr. (Frankie) 
**Timothy 

Rich, Claude 

Rich, Mrs. Lena B. Moose 

Safrit, Gary 

Sairit, Mack 
*Mrs. Debbie Harwood Safrit 

Sairit, Tommy 
*Mrs. Hazel Rowland Safrit 
**Jane 
**Patricia 

Shue, Lewis 

Sides, Hurley 

Mrs. Josie Lyerly Sides 

Smith, Mrs. Bettie Sue Barringer 

(Carl Smith) 

**Delores 

**Debbie 

**Douglas 

** Roger 

**Shelley 

Smith, James Norman 
Mrs. Rachel Bost Smith 

**Deanna 

**Tamara 



28 



Smith, Jerry AVilson, Juanita 

Smith, Leonard Worrell, Leonard 

Mrs. Elsie Penninger Smith Mrs. Colleen McDaniel Worrell 

Talley, Mrs. Effie Shue Wyant, Mrs. Valeria Penninger 

(Lee Talley) *Michael Morgan Wyant 

Trexler, Mrs. Vera Burleyson ** Joseph Cmtis (Twin) 

Whitley, Clarence Jr. ** Michael D^ile (Twin) 

Mrs. Faye Mauney Whitley **James William 

Kelly **Kimberley Annette 



SOURCTS OF INFOR.\L\TION 

Histor) Of Southern Synod by Dr. J. C. Leonard 
Pictmes of ])astors 

History Of Southern S\nod b) Dr. Banks J. Peeler 
Pictures of pastors 

Scrapbook Of Southern S)nod by Thomas L. Moose 
Pictures of pastors 

75th Anniversary Booklet, Trinity, Concord, N. C. 
Pictures of j^astors 

50th Anniversar) Booklet, St. James, Mount Pleasant, N. C. 
Pictures of pastors 

Golden Anniversary Book, Nazareth Orphans' Home, 

by Thomas L. Moose 
Pictmes of pastors 

Histor) Of CJatawba College, by Rev. Jacob Calvin Leonard, D.D. 
Pictmes of pastors 

A Historical Sketch of North Carolina Classis, by Dr. Geo. W. AVelker 

Records of Bethel (Bear Creek) 1806-1967 

Minutes of Consistory Bethel (Bear Creek) 

Minutes of Youth Ministry Bethel (Bear Creek) 

East Rowan Charge Minute Book, Joint Consistory - 1884 - 1906 

Minutes of North Carolina Classis -1906 and 1908 

The College Visitor, August 1888 -Article by Dr. Clapp 

The Reformed Church Standard, Vol. XXXVIL Number 9, October 
15, 1930 

The Reformed Church Standard, February 15, 1955 

29 




■^r*"^ T 15^'%- 



\i:aciJ y cr 



^ I t' / '^/ r I '^ yjT /^''^ '' 



f 






..:'.. >^^,,.>J, 



/.:/... ^'- 












/- 



./ 









,/ 






jyr .-^u, .*:.;,. .... /... V.:^,... ^/i,.^^'^'„„ ,v-< , 



;..V J>;.-.. /,*-.S? ..•_'.._ 7 



j:;-.v ^:,-,./,*,^ „•..,;. 









c 



■/./ 






— u:%^' 






1 x.._v ;.>/.... '^-..^^ ^^...w.>.;..^/-L '\-.;Xj ^i*::'' 



^- S^*^-^ -^--^^'"^ -^;^- 



'^^.f--^ 






-•4.- ^-,^^/ ,.,^ l^\„ t£^ .j/ c^ ..^ / ' ^ A /■«.'^, 



30 



/.. 






/ .. 



r ,/ 






'■■■v-\ 



':.'.,/■ j:,..^' /^'.'y^/.. 

... -A....:.. ^"^ '^ :--•> : t"^- ^ 

^A^^'lv.,.;;: y?., :.,^.;., /<;>.,.,.... .^..:^.. . /^.w.,- I 

::,..^:'.i^XA /-/r.^./ .;;.J-w:v „.../,/- 
^ \.\. ;. " '/^ ,\., . V' ^ ...,„^^.. . V<l 



^'; .^../ 



/ y^ ^ .. .. • •>^.ij 



\-/-,xA/;/i., 



.-.#. ,. 



.^.^:.^ v< .^^v '...• 



- /. • -'• . »■ ^ •'• .-,1 ^^ j 

/■^:->V'-'" -■■■■ ^;^-'' '-:■-■ ■■','■■ :r."" 



■■^.■/,^..z /.-..y 



/ "^^' - ---^ ...... 



.../><. 



... •/ . 






■•■/•■ 



../..- 5r, 



'^^...V?:/,,-^ 



-?t?| 



./;..• ^ /.^^> ^''-^ r' '^^ "" 



V'<; '*-<_ ' .^^ / r. ^ ^ 



■ r 



^7 
/ 






31 



. 1 i i— ■ i » « T. ii iw.' ■*^'^rn>*-~pg'' ' '<9»''* . < r fr 



.^«<*-f'.-. -^-wwi '•».-! -y w*«*y''^ * " S ' .<»*''y * 



/ 



^€!3:C€ofii(6Ht!i:^>€SiV5^Ma. , ■ Koy-?/ 



3XltO\D ^t> THAT WE, fer aiicl in conf.detalion of .he Sum of A,/xC t- /^ t^jr'J fo, c rr)" 1 "■•^-^J 

Acre, hereby grimed, paid , mo our Tttaluty l^f (^ /^/t'^l^^l iCii-tC / have Riven and gra , red, an i liy | 

thcfe PrtfenlJ, do give and grant unlO ihc UA *%^ /^/*/^^/^'W ui y ^i /y " ^'"' "' '-^' '' coaainxj 3 

^^. ^-..^U^^ .V- - /Ac,/,„n,a„dbc,ng;n,heCcn„,,of.^r^''-?' 1 

./^.dc^y^a^ ../^^,:^^Kal.,.. ^^^.„.,.y^ ?•• '^.^-^ '^-- y.r^^^y 

^. -- ^Sji^r:^ ^/^ ^'t.^,-' i^^r ^-^^X^/ x<^ %X,,U*^r:'i>^^^^^/^^4y4'f ^-^ ■*■ 1 



.-.♦.^ 



ftj by tlie rial hereunto annexed dolh tj'pear, tO(jcihcr with all \VCK5dF, Waters, Mines, Nlinerjls, Herediumct.:s, and Appurtenances to tlic 
faid Land belonging or appenainifig ; Co l)Ola lo ihe UA ,^ ^/t-Ui" //'/' ft^'^ 't ^^''t'^ 



Vl ^/^''^^/^ hii Hcin and AtTism for ever : 

Vieldinj and paying to ui fuch f-.iins ol Money, yearly orotherwife, as Oh General AfTeinWf frora^me w time may dir«l; ProSlSlt illlUafS 
Thai ihe faid Grantee (hall cauft rtlw Grant to be regi!\cred in the Regiftili's OITice of our faid Counly of C^^^' ^ f7r' f Ij «ilhin 
twelve Mnnihi from the date hereof, o;hcr«ife the fame (hall be voidi ) / ^ 

In Tetlimony*hereofi We have caufcd ihefe our Letters to be trade Palcnl, and our Greal Seal lo be lliercunio afllseJ. 

W Mzh %/l '^CW-^ tZ.^<^,fCe^^ Efquire, our Governor, Capiam General and Comman.kr in Chief, ■( RALEIGH, liii 

^cL/^ Day olCyf'^ t' f^ *^' I V iu the thirty fccond Ye*i of oujiidcpendencc, and in^y^ , Year of a a I^jsd onc-^ij^iafan-i eight 

■■ ^ —.— ■. '-■.■■■ ■■ «■' 

nndrvdand (ctcr; ""^ "^ 

BT COMMAND, 









J' 






STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA. 



No. 2124 



Know Ye, that we, for and in confideration of the Sum of fifty shillings 
for every hundred Acres hereby granted, paid into our Treafury by 
Christopher Lyerly have given and granted, and by thefe Prefents, do 
give and grant unto the faid Christopher Lyerly a Tract of Land con- 
taining one hundred Acres Iving and being in the County of Mont- 
gomery on the West side of Pee Dee River on Big Bear Creek In- 
cluding a Meeting House. Beginning at Drake Harris corner a white 
oak and runs North one hundred and forty pole with faid line thence 
West one hundred and two poles thence South one hundred and sixty 
poles thence East one hundred and two poles then North twenty poles 
to the first Station as by the Plat hereunto annexed doth appear, 
together with all Woods, Waters, Mines, Minerals, Hereditaments, 
and Appurtenances to the faid Land belonging or appertaining: To 
hold to the faid Christopher Lyerly his Heirs and Affigns for ever: 
Yielding and paying to us fuch fums of Money, yearly or otherwise, as 
our General Affembly from time to time may direct: Provided always 
That the faid Grantee fhall caufe this Grant to be regiftered in the 
Regifter's Office of our faid County of Montgomery within twelve 
Months from the date hereof, otherwife the fame fhall be void. 

In Teftimony whereof. We have caufed thefe our Letters to be made 
Patent, and our Great Seal to be thereunto affixed. 

Witnefs Nat Alexander Efquire, our Governor, Captain-General 
and Commander in Chief, at RALEIGH, the 24th Day of November 
in the thirty fecond Year of our Independence, and in the Year of our 
Lord one thoufand eight hundred and feven. 

BY COMMAND, 

Wil White Sec. Nat Alexander 



33 



t ■ /' X • t /Vl //'>■■) "/ V "^"^ <^.' .'J.. ,i., ■Tfi^^a-'"^'-^ '*^ ' L^ ^X 

/i „c tA'/2 A^^-^*^' a^f^ /^.lY^'*/^"''^ ' '/ -^'•'■'^4' ''■'"•-•■""V.' //i/<r //, ,',c. /", 

... .cc:),;^.^.^;^ y^ ;^,,. ^^/„ ^ -.Xv^^ .y :y:y-y..v y<^,...c.'^^y •- y ^ 
,.^^ /,,/./z^^.. ..^ZI.. ..... i- .,:.... ..,.,... '. y,?y:.0,,. .^ y;y.^.^'- ^ '' 




'■■'''^>/-^i^-./ 



34 



This Indenture Made the second day of July in the thirty third 
Year of our Independence and in the Year of our Lord one thousand 
eight hundred and nine between Christopher Lyerly of the County of 
Montgomery and State of North Carolina of the one part and Henry 
Sides one of the Elders of the Congregation of Bear Creek Meeting 
House and to any Succefing Elders of Said Church, Trust of 

Said Congregation in the County of State aforesaid of the other part 
W'itnefseth that for and in consideration of the Sum of fifty dollars 
to him in hand paid by the Said Henry Sides Elder as aforesaid the 
Receipt whereof the Said Christopher Lyerly doth hereby acknowledge 
hath giyen granted Bargained and Sold aliened and Confirmed by 
these present doth giye, grant Bargain &: Sell alien and Confirm only 
the Said Henry Sides Elder in Trust of the aforesaid Congregation or 
to any of his Succefsors for the use of Said Congregation foreyer all 
that tract piece or parcel of Land Situate and Being in the County of 
Montgomery and on the AVest Side of the Yadkin Riyer on Big Bear 
Creek Beginning at a ^Vhite stake E. Drake Harrison Corner and 
Six Hundred and forty poles with said line thence ^Vest one hundred 
and two poles one Hundred and Sixty poles thence East 

one Hundred and Two poles thence North 

the first Station Containing one Hundred acres of Land Including the 
Said Meeting one hundred acres m-ore or lefs Together with 

all Woods \Vaters Mines Minerals inyestmentf and appurtenancef of 
said Land Belonging or in any wise appertaining and also all the 
Estate and estates Rights Titles Claims Interest and Demands whatso- 
ever of him the Said Christopher Lyerly of in and to the Said Premises 
hereby granted or Intended to be granted or any part of thereof to have 
and to hold to said Elders as aforesaid their Succefsors to the only 
use and Behalf of them the Said Congregation their heirs and afsigns 
forever and th. Christopher Lyerly his heirs Executors &: Admin- 
istrators doth hereby Promise Covenant &: agree that the said Chris- 
topher Lyerly Shall &: will at all Times Warrant and forever defend 
the above mentioned premises to the Said Elders in Trust for the Said 
Congregation their heirs and afsigns against all Claims and Demands 
Whatsoever Whereby the Said premises Might or May be Incumbered 
Contrary of the True Intent and Meaning of These Presents In ^Vit- 
nefs Whereof the Said Christopher Lyerly hath hereunto Set his hand 
and affixed his Seal the day and year first above ^V'ritten 



Signed Sealed and Delivered 
in the Prefence of 



Christopher Lyerly (Seal) 



35 



i -^ AP'a^^n^^i4^^^l^€> ^t^^t-t^%^^y^f^if^ i_y/A.^y-t^eJZ^^^,^a.^'C> ^y^!>2^ ^ ^cy/t^C 
■ ^J -y^z^t^/-^ y^^tv^^ ^ t-A^M'if-t^y^^'^^^,..^-£^ yf^x^y^- <^,^:^-y!^ i^.^^'u^ <s<^*iw^ 




^^^ /^-e- /^je- ejip>Cy^~~co-^'£A. 



zr 



/CJ 



■<3' 



/^ci^t<jL.<^ Zl^C-« ,i2^/^^^i- ,*^^-eityU> /^^ i>'V^i-y^-'' ii<«-^Zi <L<?-I ^/Z.^yi^ ^2L cJl-z-t-V^ 



c:y^t4xr.^ y^vi-<-. i*'t^^n^ ^^^L^0^ -/^^i 



-J 



^'T^t.^t--, 












^2 'V^ '*■ 






/7 -^^'a,Ayt^it.tC- .(Sr-J-zv^ £^iiJ--f-it/''t-~ 






A^-i^^r>^■9 



36 



^ y^^^^^" ;7^^ -^.^ ;^^.^ i^i~. 



i 















37 



This Indenture Made this the 2nd day of September One Thousand 
Eight Hundred and Forty Eight Beteen Jacob Lyerlee of the county 
of Stanly and State of North Carolina of the one part and John C 
Earnhardt and John Troutman Elders of Bethel Church and their 
successors in office of the Second Part of the county of Cabarrus and 
State of North Carolina Witnefseth that the Said party of the first 
part for and in consideration of Two dollars and Fifty cents to him 
in hand Paid the receipt which Is herby fully acknowledged hath 
Sold and convey And doth hereby Sell and convey to the Said 
party of the Second part a parcel of land containing three 
Acres it lying in the county Stanly and States afor Said Bounded 
as follows Beginning at the Meeting House tract at or near the 
North east corner of Said Meeting House a corner of said Tract 
and runs North Sixteen poles to a Stake thence west thirty 
poles to a Stake thence South Sixteen poles to the Meeting house 
Tract line with said line East to the Beginning containing three acres 
to have and to hold the Same for the use of Bethel Church with the 
appurtenances there unto Beloning to the Said party of the Second 
part Their Succefsors for ever and the Said party of the first part for 
the consideration aforesaid does herby covenant & agree to warrant 
and defend the the premises aforesaid to the Said party of the Second 
part their Executors administrators and assigns against the claim and 
entry of all persons whatsoever and he doth further covenant that he 
is Seised of the premises in fee Simple and hath right to make and 
convey Such on State by this Indenture and hath done the same by 
these presents. In witnefs whereof the said party of the first part hath 
hereunto set his hand and seal on the day and year above written 

Signed sealed and delivered 
In presents of 

George Meifenhimer 
Philip Ridenhower 

Jacob Lyerle (Seal) 

North Carolina 
Stanly County 

November Sepious 1848 

Know this deed was proven in open court by the oath of Philip 
Ridenhour and ordered to be registered. 

D. Hearne, Clk 



North Carolina 
Stanly County 



November 28th 1848 



Then this deed was duly Registered in the Registers office in this 
County in Book No. 2 at page 150 

Saml Pickmon Regs 




^, 4 1^, § "I ^H^ ^n t^i"^ i'v^ ,^ ■ 













.^Ll^ll 






-I K^ 1^^^ ^- ;^— ^ ^ ^. ^11^^ ^^% . ^^ 
















39 



This Indenture Made the Eight day of February and in the year of 
our Lord one Thousand Eight Hundred and Fifty, Between Jacob 
Lyerlee of the County of Stanly and State of North Carolina of the 
first part and, John Melchor, Matthew Barringer, Edwin W. Black- 
welder, &: David D. Lents, and John C. Barnhardt, Tobias Miller, 
Jacob Barrier, &: Matthrias Moofe, Elders &: Deacons of the Evangelical 
Lutheran and German Reformed Church of the other part, Witnefseth 
that the aforesaid Jacob Lyerlee there for and Consideration of the 
Sum of Three Dollars to him in hand paid by the Said John Melchor 
and John C. Barnhardt Elders in Trust for the Congregation wor- 
shipping at Beth Church make Receipt Whereof is hereby fully 
acknowledged the said Jacob Lyerlee hath given granted, Bargained 
Cold aliened Confirmed and Conveyed and by these presents hath 
doth give grant bargain Sell aliene Confirm and Convey, unto the 
Said John Melchor and John C. Barnhardt Elders in Trust for the 
aforesaid Congregation Forever, all that Tract or Parcel of Land 
Situate Lying and Being in County of Stanly and State of North 
Carolina adjoining the old Tract of Gaired Church, Beginning at a 
Chestnut Oak on the old Line and Runs East Eight Poles to a Stone, 
Then North Forty Poles to a White Oak, Then West Eight Poles to a 
Stake, Then South Forty Poles to the Beginning Corner, Containing 
by Survey Sc Estimation Two acres of Land the same more or Lefs, 
Together with the woods, ways, waters, mines, minerals, investments, 
appertenances, to Said Land Belonging or in anywise appertaining 
and also all the Estate Right Title, Claim Interest and Demand, what- 
soever of him the said Jacob Lyerlee of in and to said Promises, hereby 
granted or Intended To be granted all and Every part thereof To have 
and To hold To the Said John Melchor & John C. Barnhart Elders 
aforesaid &: their Succefsors in office to the only proper use and behoof 
of them the Said Congregation their heirs and afsigns Forever and the 
Said Jacob Lyerlee his heirs Executors Sc Administrators doth hereby 
Covenant and agree that the Said Jacob Lyerlee shall and will at all 
Time, warrant & Forever Defend the above mentioned premises to 
the Said John Melchor & John C. Barnhart Elders &: their Succefsos 
in Trust for Said Congregation their heirs and afsigns against all 
Claims and Demands Whatsoever Whereby the Said promises might 
or may be Encumbered Contrary To the True Intent or meaning of 
these presents, In Witnefs Whereof the Said David Lyerlee hath here- 
unto Set his hand and affixed his Seal, the day and year first above 
Written. 

Jacob Lyerlee (Seal) 
40 



Signed Sealed and 
Delivered in the presence 
of Philip Ridenhour 
Daniel Melchor 



North Carolina) February Sepious 1850 

Stanly County ) Then this deed was acknowledged 
in open court and ordered to be registered. 

R. Z. Caviseth 



North Carolina ) February the 20th 1850 

Stanly County ) Then this deed was duly registered in the registers 
office of said County in Book No. 2 page 295 

Saml. S. Stone Reg. 

JACOB LYERLEE DEED TO JOHN MELCHOR, 
JOHN C. BARNHART FOR TWO ACRES OF LAND 

FEE NOT PD., DUE 60 CENTS 



41 



r" 



C Y&^ci tr c^ . htd^a^rdi 



c^v^ 



3 



aiu liner /\ud (i^CUcA :Jc/lc-^'^J,)tc^tuj ^/jScl/^cL 






m^'Aufdc 'cat J1^ /^^^^^ t^cu LLooctrJi^ M^ ^/zc lJ:^ 












A t^, 



■ '' l-C CLl l^ fi L^ ■ /O I 



^ 






n 



42 






7 'J ' ^ '' ' / ' V 

,_ (3^2 i,<u/ uZ ^{Jtl (LJ6C<-cI , Ci i-^cL li-c^J due ex fcl{n -^ ii-^ tr/t c-l 

J / 



a^jL l-i-^L. ,HiJ/', /I'h/c^Mc,^ j^ /TZi JIcJ6t^c.^1^^l^^ 



\ ' ^ .'Uii U-ZZt-U. . yL^^ ^UL C'td L^icci.LcJ^ , I'kci^ eicZ^^cL ^^ifcl e-(Lc'^ 



V 



43 



''^C 



' X //u .^.. ^'^l< y " , '■< ^ - . r^ V ^v^^i V ^n. v_^4S;>-/<^«^.y-;, ..^^ ~ 



: e^- 1 



44 



^^ 3^N>^ 



~ \ V 









^ 



u 



1 



^.^-^ 









>^ 









--^ 



■J 

d 



• i 



c — 









M//,u^ >y/h//u 



/^c/l } 









l&itl^'u 



6i>w ^ , 



■i-fCy 



1/ 



'/-■ 






/7 -Vf 












45 



State of North Carolina) 
Stanly County ) 

This indenture made between Philip Ridenhour and Caleb Lefler, 
Trustees of Bethel Evangelical Lutheran Congregation in Stanly 
County N. C. of the one part and William A. Moody, a Trustee of 
that portion of said Congregation who desire to remain at the old 
church, of the other part witnefseth: 

Whereas by the adjudication of a Committee appointed by the 
Evangelical Lutheran Synod of N.C. held on 15th July 1875, the 
Congregation represented by Philip Ridenhour and Caleb Lefler as 
Trustees, are to hold the proceeds of the sale of the Parsonage amount- 
ing to $246.00; the Jubilee fund, amounting to $14.00, the Church 
Book, Valued at $6.00, and are to have $58.00, from the joint treasury 
(including $8.00, for this years crop of grain raised on the Church 
lands), and the transfer of a judgment against A. Misenheimer for 
$35.00 making a total of three hundred and fifty nine ($359.00) dollars; 
now in consideration of these several sums specified above; the receipt 
of which is hereby acknowledged, the said Philip Ridenhour &: Caleb 
Lefler, Trustees aforesaid, on behalf of themselves &: their succefsors 
in office, do hereby bargain, sell and transfer to Wm. A. Moody, Trus- 
tee aforesaid, and his succefsors in office (as the legal agent of that 
portion of the Lutheran Congregation who desire to remain at the 
old church) all the right, title Sec. of the Lutheran Congregation in 
the old church, now owned and occupied jointly by the German Re- 
formed and Lutheran Congregations, together with all the right, title 
and interest of said Lutheran Congregation, to one half of the tract 
of land on which the old church stands and owned jointly by the 
German Reformed & Lutheran Congregations, containing about one 
hundred & twelve (112) acres— be the same more or lefs, to be held 
forever, by the said William A. Moody and his succefsors in office, 
together with all rents, incomes See, which may arise from said lands, 
in Trust for the use 8c benefit of a Lutheran Congregation worshipping 
at the old church. 

The right to the use of the grave yard attached to the old church, is 
hereby reserved, for the benefit of these members of the Lutheran 
Congregation worshipping at the new church, who may desire to bury 
their dead therein. 

We also hereby obligate ourselves to protect & defend, the said 
William A. Moody, Trustee aforesaid, against any and every claim 
or demand; which may be made by Bethel Lutheran Congregation, 
which we represent (or by our present Pastor) to any par tof the 
property which by this indenture is hereby bargained &: transferred 

to William A. Moody, Trustee, aforesaid Given under our hand, 

this 16th day of August A.D. 1875. 

Witnessed by Philip Ridenhour (Seal) 

Ritchey Caleb Lefler (Seal) 

PHILIP RIDENHOUR AND CALEB LEFLER 
TO WILLIAM A. MOODY 

46 



384 



Ctpiligl^t 35 ^allxn^. 



A. S. Kieffer. 



USED BY PERMISSION. 



B. C. Unseld. 



^ 



^ 



i-Ui - ui 



s 



^ 



Tdr 



y^^ 



t 



1. Twi- light is fall-ing o - ver the sea, Shad-ows are steal-ing dark on the 

2. Voi - ces of loved ones, songs of the past, Still lin - ger round me while life shall 

3. Come in the twi-light,come,cometome! Bring-ing some mes-sage o - ver the 



it 



tfi 



^. 



r IF h £ 



1 



ir-t^ 



L b r 



?r^ 



Fine 



^S 



i=t;==t=^ 



I=j4^ 



-t;-ir j= 



i^ 



lea; Borne on the night- winds, voi-ces of yore Come from the far - off shore, 
last; Lone - ly I wan-der, sad - ly I roam, Seek- ing that far - off home, 
sea, Cheer-ing my path-way while here I ro^m. Seek - ing that far - off home. 



^ 



#-^ - 



F?=i^ 



it 



V-- 



- P a 



t=t 



-*- 



f^ ' i b r ^ 



, S. — Gleam-eth a mansion, filled with de-light, Sweet hap -py home so bright! 
/ Chorus. f>^ ^ k , (^ D.S 



k^ 



^ 



-J^-^-b- 



-It^- 



i 



3 



Far a - way be-yond the star-lit skies,Where the love-light never, nev-er dies. 



■i I ^r--h — h — h — h — (s^ — » » l > • ^ =i — » » *- 



I 



P P u u 



f=^ 



l^ D U [? 



From T/;e Modern Hymnal. © Copyright 1926. Renewed 1953 Broadman Press. 
All rights reserved. Used by permission. 



47 



PICTURE SECTION 



MEMORY LANE 

Oft times in thought I drift away 

When the daily grind is through, 
Back to the realm of a by-gone day 

To pause for a moment or two; 
With a carefree heart I laugh and talk 

And live the old hours anew: 
It's sweet down Memory Lane to walk 

With an Old Time Friend like you. 

By J. B. Downie 



AT THE GATE 

She told me how she stood at the gate 
Waiting, waiting, happy to wait; 
First for the father who kissed her there, 
Called her darling, and stroked her hair; 
Then for the lover, when twilight slipped. 
And the mulberry leaves were silver tipped, 
As the moon peeped over the gardens rim. 

And from that gate one heart-break day. 
She watched her tall son stride away; 
The tears she would not deign to shed. 
As bravely he went with high flung head. 
Out into the world that was calling him. 

Still she stands, tho they all are gone, 
Still she looks wistfully up and down. 
Watching alone by the garden gate— 
Whom does she await? 

By Emir F. Ammerman 



48 




BETHEL BEAR CREEK 

Pastors 



Rev. George Boger 
1806-1830 



Rev. Daniel B. Lerch 
1830-1834 



Rev. \V. C. Rankin 

Supply 

1835 



Rev. AV. C. Bennett 

Supplv 

1835-1836 



Rev. John Lantz 
1837-1853 



Rev. Thornton Butler 
1853-1869 



Rev. J. C. Denny 
1869-1876 



Rev. John Ingle 

Supplied for 

Butler and Denny 




49 



Rev. Dr. J. C. Clapp 

1874-1876 




Dr. Moses A. Foil 

Alternate Supply 

1874-1876 




Rev. Robert F. Crooks 
1876-1881 




Rev. G. D. Gurley 
1882-1884 





Rev. Calvin B. Heller 
1884-1891 



Rev. J. J. Excell 

Supply 
3 Months 1892 




Rev. Peter M. Trexler 
Supply 1892 



Rev. Paul Barringer 
1894-1897 




50 




Rev. \V. H. McNairy 
1897-1900 



Rev. Michael Hedrick 

Supplv for McNairy 

1897 



Rev. C. H. Riedesel 
1900-1903 



Rev. W. \V. Rowe 
1904-1906 




Rev. Paul Barringer 

Supply 

1906 



Rev. E. Garver Williams 
1906-1909 



Rev. A. Shulenberger 

Supply 

1910-1911 



Rev. Border L. Stanley 
1911-1914 




51 




Rev. William C. Lyerly 
1914-1918 



Rev. Aaron R. Tosh 
1919-1921 



Rev. Charles W. Warlick 
1922-1929 





Rev. William S. Gerhard 
1930-1941 



Rev. Aubrey Hedrick 
1942-1949 



Rev. Thomas Hoffman 
1950-1953 



Rev. Mark F. Sollinger 
1954-1958 



Rev. Charles E. Hiatt 
1958-1967 



52 





^•y# 



^it 





Rev. Harold Holste 
1967-1971 



j*««>^ 




Rev. Harve\ Black 
Supplv 1971 



Rev. Henrv J. Meier 

1972-' 





I 



BEAR CREEK SONS WHO WENT INTO 
CHRISTIAN MINISTRY 



Jacob A. Palmer 




Columbus C. "Wagoner 



Felix B. Peck 



Rev. R. ^V. Allman 



Rev. Lester Allman 
53 





Historical Marker 
Erected October, 1974 



Photo by Donald Warren Moose 
Spirit of 1776 




Art Photography by Donald Warren Moose 
The cemetery gate to the old rock walled cemetery inclosure 1806. 

54 , - 







o 



c 
h 



V C 



^ o 

•— i- 



z c 



OJ o 



C c 



h ^ 



55 



X 
Pi 

u 

H 




S Oh 

o 2 

c . 

^ Sd 

■5 "I 

0-1 

<v > 

>.^ 






CO O 

o 

00 






a; o 



p 



o 

u 

'S 
'3d 



■S:S > 



o 
o 





T3 


IA> 




KJ be 


rt 


^ c 


C 




o 


.2 0^ 


Q 


X! ^ 




H^ 


X! 



-^ -^ 



3 
x 



n s ^ p 



*5 •" t« 

^ ^ ^ OJ 







3 
J3 



3 
Si 



57 



SECOND CHURCH 





Tile second Bethel, Bear Creek Reformed Church, was built in 1878, 
remodeled 1906, when Lutheran members separated and formed their 
own Bethel Lutheran Church, several miles east from the Reformeds. 



58 



PRESENT CHURCH 




Photo by Ed Readliii^ 
Third Bethel Bear Creek Church, built in 1928. 



59 








;> 



05 



l\ f-'^ 






bO 
C 
O 

U 

H 




60 



jlgUpp^? " 







faC 

60 
C 
O 
U 



61 




'* o 






3 
cq 

<u 
bo 
cs 

C 

o 

Sh 





J3 
h 



62 




a 


^ 
t^ 


UJ 


CT) 


fii 




-3 


qj 


W 


C 


>^ 


3 


Si 


'"") 


o 


c 






o 

Oh 


tf5 



c: 

p3 






pq 



cq 



63 




0^ 






64 






J3 

2 S 

o o^ 



3 



c 

3 

s 

6 
o 

u 

<u 



pq 



65 




Left. The Mission Band 1941. 
First row 1 to r: Peggy Lentz, 
Peggy Bost, Hazel Barringer. 
Kneeling: Jeraldine Barrier, 
Donald Broome, Gladys Bar- 
ringer, Felix Barringer. Stand- 
ing: Robert Barringer, Lester 
Moose, Dwight Love, Richard 
Petrea, Zeb Barringer. Standing 
back row: Melvin Moose, Birdie 
Moose, Bob Hurlocker, Ruby 
Rowland, Billy Barrier, Horace 
Broome. 



The Girls Guild 1931. Front row: 1 to r: Ollie Blackwelder, Jane 
Penninger, Francis Rowland, Lena Brown Moose, Elma Moose, Ester 
Moose. Back rows: Bessie Allman, Edith Penninger, Verna Lentz, Faye 
Penninger, Mary Lowder, Estelle Penninger, Grace Penninger, Mar- 
jorie Moose, Shirley Rowland, Shirley Honeycutt, Nell Hurlocker. 

Lamelle Moose 



66 




^ ^ V 



•r.C o^ 





"^ — —' ji 












"^ '-^ ~ "c 












iJ^ ^^ "* 


















= H^-S-^ 












' — ''-X ^ 't 


















■if bi 






— ^r ^ 






- CJ = J 






^N^ .— . " 












>-'^ S -5 






;5 7= i^ -§" 






- ^- ^ 






^ , »— H 




















t: § -^:£ 










Q- 






— j~ ^ - 










^ 


H-* '^ ~ ~ 




^ 












)— ^ 


3c :J — ' 7- 




QJ 


C b£ — 




Ph 




t« 


"^ "i^ -^ > 




C 


~ ~ CI 




a; 


- OEPri 




:§ 


>-Ch 




V 


^ - 5 'S 






Ray Moose, Keith Honeyciitl, 
^arringer. StancHns* 1 to r; [on; 
ulall, Dolph Lentz, [ames Lowe 
ntz, Clarence Whitley, jack Be 






.-— l; SJ 


^ 




- j-i^ J 


QJ 




O '^ 


;/5 




■ii -C >- >- 


















l^-^JI 


i 




"S S '"' CJ 






^ U- X sJ 


v5 



67 



THE WOMEN'S FELLOWSHIP 1974 




Photo by Ed Readling 

Front row: 1-r: Nora Hiirlocker, Helen Lyerly (sec.) , Barbara Moose 
(evening circle chm.), Bessie Lentz (vice pres.), Mary Kendall (pres.), 
Ruth Meier (treas.), Ida Mae Hurlocker, Verna Lentz, Elma Barrier. 
(Racie Penninger, morning circle chm. not present.) 

Second row: Mary Petrea, Clara Lentz, Helen Barrier, Ruth Moose, 
Cynthia Buckwell, Dianne Hiatt, Eloise Moose, Frances Barnhardt, 
Vikki Cline, Mary Anna Cline. ' 

Standing: Elsie Smith, Mary Fisher, Nellie Penninger, Nancy Moose, 
Faye Whitley, Mary Alice Moose, Annie Mae Huneycutt, Ruby Hart- 
sell, Vera Trexler. 



68 



THE MUSIC MINISTRY 1974 




Photo bv Ed Readlin^ 

Front row: 1-r: Debbie Moose, Ida Mae Hurlocker, Ruth Meier, Cyn- 
thia Buckwell, Shirley Hurlocker. 

Second roAv: Bessie Lentz (Director), Gail Bergeron, Ruth Moose, 
Barbara Moose, Mary Anna Cline, Mary Alice Moose. 
Standing: Re^■. Meier, Archie Moose, Charles Hiatt, Verna Lentz 
(organist), Holly Lentz, Sherry Moose, Robin Huneycutt, Reba Moose, 
Elsie Smith, Nora Hurlocker. 

Absent when picture was made: Racie Penninger, Murray Penninger, 
Varah Moose. 



69 



THE YOUTH MINISTRY 




Photo by Ed Readling 

Seated— L-R— Debbie Moose, Sherry Moose, Robin Huneycutt, Jack 
Kendall, Barbara Cruse, David Shoal, Pamela A. Penninger, Jerry 
Smith. 

Standing: Rev. Meier, Alvin Hurlocker, Shirley Hurlocker (Adult 
Counsellors); Anthony Hartsell, Tommy Earnhardt, Kelly Whitley, 
Reba Moose. 



70 



THE CHILDREN'S MINISTRY 1974 





I V.-^ ^-' Vi ;%/ 




Photo by Ed Readling 

Seated— L-R: David Hurlocker, Timothy Hurlocker, Kenny Buckwell, 
Melissa Moose, Mark Earnhardt, Jeff Earnhardt. 

Standing: Denise Hiatt, Eeverly Hiatt, Erenda Hurlocker, (In mother's 
lap) Douglas Buckwell, Andre Bergeron. 



71 



BEAR CREEK TROOP 110 BOY SCOUTS 1974 




Photo by Ed Readling 

Seated— L-R: David Moose, Ricky Huneycutt, Richard Bergeron II, 
Michael Barnhardt, Jack Kendall, Tommy Earnhardt, David Shoaf, 
Barry Moose, Patrick Bergeron, Anthony Hartsell. 

Standing: Joe Moose, Willard Moose Committeemen; Kenneth Keasler, 
Scoutmaster; William Petrea, Jerry Smith, Charles Penninger, Johnny 
Hartsell, Rev. Meier— Institutional Representative. (Sidney Hartsell— 
Committeeman not in picture.) 




< 



M 


^ 


(^ 




h 


^ 


h 


^ 


NN 
^ 
S 




c 


v5 


u 


i; 






o 


ij 


z 


% 


HN 




/^ 


> 


f"^ 


V 


J 


V 


^^ 


^ 


;^ 


■j: 


*^ 


^ 










w 


S 





■J-. 


< 


CJ 


z 


O 





^Jh 


^ 


1 — ) 


^ 


j-T 


< 




^ 










^ 


M 


^ 


ffi 


;:q 


H 






-C 








3 




hJ 




1:4 




o 



73 




Daniel M. Moose 
Son of George 



John Fritch Moose 
Son of George 




Cailiarine Amanda Moose 

Daugliter of George 
Married Cager Barringer 



Charlie Barringer 
Son of Catharine Barringer 
and his wife Mary Barringer 



74 




_,,^ 


iJ^,^ 


^ 


C o 


QJ 


■ -» in 


,C 


-a o 
















-G ^ 


^ — ' 






-i^" 


c 


w 


c 


.- o 



1=° 



^ y? — 

^ s ^ 



c 



'-' o 



b'~ 2 5 



-^2 ^ 



X r: cj 

s '^ "= 



H-i S H 



75 







^ ^ O 

rt o o 

.Si :£ w 

<U ^ X 
r^ CD 



<^ d) O 
^ IJ [J 

^ O :^ 



2 rt 



fe 



^ qj H- 1 -.4-1 

- r- =^ ^ 

t: -^. '^ 

> O . S_, 

i> ^, N a; 

gls.s 

o ^ o 2 
^ o S ii 



cJ^^^Cw 



76 




William Fritch Moose and wife Lora Brown (Fisher) with two grand- 
children (L) ^Vyatt Moose Jr. and Mvron Cox. 

Children of ^Villiam were: Roy Heller, Marv Ethel, AVyatt H., Frank 
Hoy, and Shirlev Fisher. 







John Wade Moose and wife Agnes Grace (Fisher) Avith sons L. to R. 

Perry Earl, John Forrest, and Hoy. 

Picture made on fiftieth wedding anniversary. 



77 




Arthur Farrell Moose Family 

Seated: Lena Brown, Marjorie, Arthur Farrell (father) ,Tena (Rowland) 

(mother), Archie. 

Standing: Harold, Birdia, Melvin. 










^%^l 





dkl- ^^' ,1 



Jason Hugh Moose Family 

Front L to R: Ramelle, Flora, Eltha, Elma. 

Back: Nora, Jason Hugh, wife MoUie, and Ray Moose. 

78 





William Osboni Lyerlv Famih— ^\'illiam was a grandson of Chris- 
topher Lyerly Jr. 

Front L to R: Mary Lee (Mrs. Shuford Tucker), Josie (Mrs. J. H. Sides), 
Gary, and Clifford. 

Back row: John, William Osborn (father), Rachel Rebecca Sides 
(mother), George B., and wife Amanda Morgan and Estelle. 
Children not shown; Daisy (Mrs. Charlie Earnhardt) Hatte (Mrs. M. L. 
Blume), Lilly (Mrs. Gus Blume), Rosenell, David, and Bruner. 




O qj 



c^ 



«8 






Oh 
3 








o 



2 -W 



CO en 



'5 (u 
« a; 

II 
II 

t/3 rt SS 

^ is 



h! 



80 




Col George Barnhardt 
Born Dec. 17, 1791 
Died Sept. 27, 1871 



Wife Martha Reed 
Born 1803 
Died 1863 

Photo Reproduction by 
Lawson Bonds Studio 



The children of George and Martha were; John Mathias, Julia Ann, 
Jacob C^olumbus, Margaret Amanda, Henry \Villiam, Georp^e Franklin, 
Alfred Bichvell, James Edney Harrison, Marshal Lantz, and Martha 
Ann Josephine. Col. George was a son of Mathias Barnhardt and wife 
Ann Margaret Bushardt. Martha Reed was a daughter of John Reed 
whose son Conrad Reed found the gold nugget in Meadow Creek on 
the Reed farm in Cabarrus County. This led to the first gold mine in 
America. Later it was Col. George Barnhardt who discovered the first 
gold in Gold Hill and named the town of Gold Hill. 

Before the first meeting house was built services were held in the barns 
of Christopher Lyerly and Mathias Barnhardt. It was at these iwo 
places that Bear Creek Lutheran and Reformed Church was organized. 



81 





John Hugh Moose and wife 
Rebecca Artz. 



Daughters of John Hugh and 
Rebecca; Seated L to R: Frances 
Marie, and Alice Henrietta. 
Standing L to R: Ellen Julia, 
Sarah Catharine, and Mable 
Louise. 




Sons of John Hugh and Rebecca; Front row L to R: William Baxter, 
Boyd Artz, and Ernest Reiter. Back rowf L to R: Jason Hugh, John B. 
Gilbert, and George Kelly. 



82 





David Lyerly 1815-1890 Jane Lyerly 1820-1894 

Parents of Mrs. Charlie Fisher, Mrs. William Moody 

and Mrs. Green Sides 




William A. Moody & Wife 
Lundy (Lyerly) Moody 



John A. Rowland and wife Dana 
(Rogers) Rowland, Harley, Jay, 
and Macon. 




Victor Columbus Lentz and wife Sarah Elizabeth (Dry) Lentz. Their 
children were Malcolm Greely, Anna, and Adolphus Crooks. Mr. Lentz 
was a musician and singing master. Through his efforts the first organ 
in the community was obtained for Bethel Church around the turn of 
the centurv (shown above). 



84 




Malcolm G. Lentz and wife Martha Lula (Moose) Lentz children: Front 
row: Verna Elizabeth, Mary Anna, on lap. Standing: Helen Alma, 
Glenna Dale, Clara Etta. 




Left. 



Calvin Peck and ^vife Anna 
(Lentz) Peck. Children: Left, 
Felix B. Peck, Right, Lena 
Peck. 



85 




George Henry Moose and wife, Anna Lentz (Peck) Moose Family. 
Front row: Dera Moose, Anna (mother), Esther Moose, George Henry, 
Bessie Moose. Back row: Felix B. Peck, and Lena Peck. George was 
treasurer of Nazareth Children's Home 1912-1947. 



86 




Adolphus Crooks Lentz Family 




Above: Adolphus Lentz and wife 
Desda (Kendall) Lentz with chil- 
dren born to Mary Anna (Moose) 
Lentz (first wife). L to R: Cleo 
Leona, Ray Harold, Holly M., 
and Carl Ritchter. 



Left: Mary Anna (Moose) Lentz, 
daughter of John Fritch Moose. 






CA) 




c 




C ;« 03 

<^ x: ^ 
Q'S >. 

re ~ 

IJ :^ r3 

•—I t/5 ^^ 

b;D U 

•—I 'X '■*-' 

2 8° 

O > OJ 

oj I — jO 
•^ --^ 
' ■ O a 

^ ^ ^r 

^ ° ^ 

•5 ^ ^^ 
^ <^ Q 



re 






88 




Charlie P. Fisher Family 

L to R in yard: AN'illiam F. Moose, and wife Lora Fisher Moose, 
(infant in arms Ethel Moose), Anna Fisher, Vance Fisher, Charlie 
Theo))olis Fisher and wife Julia Lyerly Fisher, Travis Miller and wife 
Florence Fisher Miller (holding daughter Vernie Miller), in front 
standing, Elsie Miller, Baxter Moose and ■wife Effie Fisher Moose, 
in rocking chair Grace Moose. 

L to R on porch: Gurley Fisher, Charlie Miller, Agnes Grace Fisher, 
Lalah Miller, Josie Fisher, and Marv jane Fisher. 



89 




William Alexander Palmer 

Son of Green Palmer and wife 

Martha (Dumas) Palmer 



Margaret (Peggy) (Misenheimer) 

Palmer, wife of 

William Alexander Palmer 






4 --> •»'** "'j'^' 





Left. Margaret (Peggy) Palmer 
and two grandchildren Lewis 
Palmer and Carl Palmer on lap. 



90 




Daniel ^\'ebster Palmer and ^Vife Camilla Fisher 
Son of AVm. Alexander (Alex) Palmer 

Their children were: Gurley, Jacob Alexander, Martha, Eunice, 
George, John, Malcolm, and Claude. 




Marcus Palmer and Wife Anna Morton 
Son of "Wm. Alexander (Alex) Palmer 

Front row L to R: Ramell (Mrs. Luke Petrea), Grady Palmer, (married 
Elizabeth Pa'rsons). Standing: Marcus and Anna, Vida (Mrs. Shinn 
Davis) and Jave (Mrs. Cleve Grant). (Not shown are two sons: Carl 
Leonard and Lewis Oscar.) 

91 




Seated L to R: John A. Troutman, Simion Troutman. 

Standing L-R: Mary Troutman, Crissy Troutman, and Sallie Marie 
Troutman. All are sons and daughters of Jacob Troutman and grand- 
children of Peter Troutman. 



92 




William George Harter Barringer and Avife Cornelia (Lentz) Barringer. 
Children: Marie standing between parents, (m. Herrin). Back L to R: 
Grover Cle\eland, I.illie. Manda Alice (m. Kluttz). 




Left 

Mathias Monroe Penninger. His 
wife not shown was Emillia 
(Blackwelder) Penninger. Their 
children were Jonas Penninger, 
Martin Penninger, Albert Pen- 
ninger. 



93 




Martin Luther Penninger Family. Front L to R: Martin Luther, 
Murray Leonard, Emma Jane, mother Minnie Victoria Hahn, on lap 
Alma Faye, Lana Brown, Agnes Pauline, Homer Clifford, Willie 
Birdella, William Luther inset. Martin Luther was a son of Mathias 
Monroe Penninger and Emillia Blackwelder. 



94 




Albert Penninger Family 

First row, L to R: Pearl Lucile, Annie Louise, Ellen Grace. Second 
row: Albert Monroe holding Edith Alberta, and ^viie Lizzie Mae 
(Smith) Penninger. 




Jonas Napoleon Penninger Family 

L to R, front: John Lamar, Laura Ramel, Ester Ruth. Back row: Jonas 
N. Penninger, wife, Alice Henrietta (Moose) Penninger, Estelle liable, 
Arthur Heller, Myrtle Lee, and Banks Monroe. 

95 




Seated: Isaac Shoe, Sandy Shoe. Standing: John Shoe. John moved to 
Tennessee, died in Arkansas. 



96 




Addison Peck 

Son of Peter Peck 

Grandson of Richard Peck 



Mary Lou Moose Peck 

^\'ife of Addison Peck 

Daughter of George Moose 




Albert Shoe 
Son of Isaac Shoe 



Alice Moose Shoe 

^Vife of Albert Shoe 

Daughter of George Moose 



97 




%T,.^ 



J. Lawson Peck and wife Nancy (Moose) Peck with son Lewis who 
was killed in the mine at Gold Hill (never married). Other children 
not shown were: Julia C, Calvin, C. Hoke. 





James Thomas Hartman 



Julia Catharine (Peck) Hartman 



Their children were: Clarence C, Hattie R., Mae L., Anna Lee, Ralph 
E., Eunice M., Thelma N., Clyde H., Katherine V. Mother Julie was 
daughter of J. Lawson Peck. 



98 



^ 




Horace Clarence \\'hitley 

Father of H. C, jr., Gene H. 

and Ahra Gail ^Miitlev 



Katherine V. (Hartman) ^Vhitley 
Wife of Clarence H. AMiitley 





Clyde Hartman 




Anna Lee Hartman 
Married Ransom C. Lipe 



Ralph Hartman 



99 




Horace Barrier Family 

Horace F. Barrier, son of Moses Adolphus Barrier and Hannah (Sides) 
Barrier. Kneeling L to R: Cecil, Geraldine Hurlocker, Clarence, Mil- 
dred (Parker), Cliff Parker, Billy. Standing: Horace F. Barrier, Elma 
(Moose), Ray Moose, Helen (Fisher), Banks, Hubert, Horace F. Jr., and 
Bethel (Cody). Mother Hannah (Sides) not shown. 




William (^Vill) Robert Shoe Family 

Sitting: Annie Lee. Standing L to R: Ellen, Fred, William Robert 
Shoe, and wife Julia Hurlocker, back of Mrs. Julia is Frank, Paid, 
Mary, Lewis and Ike. 

100 




Crooks Hurlocker Family 

Seated: }. Crooks Hurlocker, Elsie Hahn Hurlocker (wile); Standing: 
Mamie, Bruner, Nellie, Minlie, Lena, Gertie, and Glenna. 



101 




George Blackwelder and wife Sally (Brown) Blackwelder. 

Children were: Jasper, Martin, Ruben, Noah, fohn, Ora, Tena, and 
Annie Mae. 




Left. 

Noah Blackwelder and wife 
Myrtle Poplin Blackwelder. Chil- 
dren were: Betty, Christine, Bob- 
by, James Francis. 



102 







Rufus Alexander Moose (son of Christopher Stoffer Moose) "ivith 
grandchildren. Front row L to R: John David, Billv Dwight Sides, 
Odelh Ho\t. Ruth Funderbiirk. Back row: White Funderburk, R. D., 
Carrie Ethel. Lillian. Ralph and Frank (t^vins), fames. Cletiis Funder- 
burk. (Jane Elizabeth Beaver was wife of Rufus.) 




George Jackson Hurlocker, (son 
of George Christopher Hur- 
locker) and wife Leah Peacock. 
Catherine Evan Isenhour was 
wife of George Jackson. Two 
sons shoAvn are L to R: ^Valter 
and Charlie. Not shown are two 
daughters Mary Ellen and Nora. 



103 




T. M. Rinehardt and 
wife Julia Shoe, son 
David W. Rinehardt 



Luke Fisher 
Son of Julius Fisher 




Calvin Fisher and wife Lizzie 
Joan Barrier. Children, L to R: 
Ralph Davis, Fritz Alexander, 
and Paul Deberry. Calvin was 
son of Julius Fisher. Joan was 
daughter of Davis Barrier. 



Berry and Dora Hurlocker 



104 




Martha Ellen (Peck) Rowland 
Mother of: John A. Rowland, 
Mamie (Ro^vland) Barringer, 
Tena (Rowland) Moose, \V. 
Jason Rowland. 



Henry Thomas Allman and wife 
Jennie (Shoe) Allman. Parents of 
Rev. Lester Allman, Rev. Ray 
Allman, Jesse Allman, Alvin All- 
man, Bessie (Allman) Lentz. 




105 




C 



PQ 





(U 


■ 








^ 


0^ 


i. 


«l-^ 




^ 


s 


_aj 




Cj 


J— ( 




flH 


y-H 


Ij 


iH 


U 


X 


<u 




^ 


bo 


*" 


OJ 


_C 


^ 


O^ 




OJ 




<n 


4— ' 


flj 


pq 




rt 
S 






_a; 




faJD 


*5 




i-H 


< 




OJ 


^ 




eq 


>^ 




w 






in 






3 


t/T 




•4~) 


s*^ 




H 


T3 

C3 




xT 







OJ 






N 





^ c 



106 




September 27, 1959 

Pictured above are members of the Sunday School who were awarded 
pins for perfect attendance for the number of years indicated following 
the name. First row: Nancy Love 3, Sharon Gardner I, Alvin Hurlocker 
6, Tommy Burleyson 3. Second row: Mrs. Charlie Hurlocker 5, Mrs. 
Lee Petrea 7, Benny Moose 4, Leonard Moose 4, Ray P. Moose 1, Mrs. 
Bruner Hurlocker 1. Third row: Dianne Hartsell 4, Lynda Moose 7, 
Mrs. Forrest Moose 7, Forrest Moose 14, Sidney J. Hartsell 4. (Forrest 
Moose at the time of his death in 1972, 27 years perfect attendance). 

—Rev. Charles E. Hiatt, Pastor 



107 







Miss Verna Lentz honored for her service as President of Synodical 

Women's Guild. 




Aunt Agnes (Aggie) Harkey 
Celebrating her 101 birthday March 6, 1974 



108 



T"7¥. 




109 







< 



c 

Oh 
O 



110 



Peck Academy 
Opened Around 1880 Closed in 1929 



Front row L to R: Charlie Von Cannon, Earl Moose, Holly Lentz, 
Clyde Hartman, Virgie Sides, Grace Penninger, Shirley Moose, Daisy 
Lowder, Lillie Morgan, (Teacher), Lola Sanders, Virgie Melchor, 
Esther Moose, Catherine Hartman, Lamelle Moose, Buford Earnhardt, 
Sidney Melchor, Alonzo VonCannon, Murray Penninger, Grover 
Lowder. 

Second row: Clifford "Ted" Lyerly, Lex Melchor, Floyd Moose, Grady 
Melchor, Grady Pinion, Josie Sides, Thelma Hartman, Bessie Moose, 
Verna Lentz, Cleo Lentz, Laura Penninger, Dera Moose, Ruth Pen- 
ninger, Zula Hurlocker, \Villie Penninger, Rene Melchor, Elma Moose, 
Pearl Penninger, Brown Penninger, Brown Melchor, Carl Lowder, 
Liuher Van Cannon, Robert Pinion. 

Third row: Frank Moose, Carl Lentz, Carl Moose, Max Melchor, Ellen 
Lowder, Lucy Hatley, Flora Moose, Nola Hurlocker, Nora Moose, 
Helen Lyerly, (Oscar AValker, Teacher), (John Hugh Moose, Charlie 
Earnhardt, and ^\^ A. Lyerly Committeemen), Ernest Barringer, John 
Penninger, Thouern Dry, Gary Lyerly, Homer Penninger. 

Fourth row: Banks Penninger, Eltha Moose, Mary Lee Lyerly, Ethel 
Hurlocker, Josie Lyerly, Eva Hatley, Mertie Earnhardt, Pauline Pen- 
ninger, Estella Penninger, Ralph Hartman, Felix Peck, Ray Melchor, 
Floyd Melchor, Ra) Moose, ^\'yatt Moose, Sam Barringer, Ro) Lentz, 
Adam Hatley. 



Ill 




The Quilting Party, Women's Guild 

Left picture: Bessie Moose, Dera Arey, Mrs. Will Shoe, Mrs. Charlie 
Earnhardt, Mrs. Will Smith, Mrs. M. L. Penninger, Mrs. Jacob Pickler, 
Jennie Moose. Right picture: Ida Mae Hurlocker, Bessie Lentz, Helen 
Lyerly and Esther Harwood. 




The Old Field One Room School — sketch by Archie E. Moose 

Bear Creek School teachers: Ethel Cox, Wilma Tucker, Pauline Pen- 
ninger, Glenna Lentz, Price Barringer, Catharine Alexander, and 

Bertha Shankle. 

112 




To Church With 
Nellie Harwood 



-i**4^ 



The Birthday Dinner for 
Andy Harwood 





The Automobile 



113 




The Chicken Yard 



SOCIAL SECURITY PIONEER STYLE 

DOES IT SEEM SO LONG AGO 

COMMON SCENES 



The Horse and Buggy 




The Bicycle 




Hog Killing 



115 



Hi *— ■" ^ I .L 




A. C. Lentz— Saddles and Harness 

Five generations of Leather Craftsmen: John Lentz, G. F. Peter Lentz, 
V. C. Lentz, Adolphus Crooks Lentz, Holly Moose Lentz. 




The Horse Drawn Hay Mower 



116 




11' 




Horse Power 





\f 




The Cow Lot 



118 




The Sheep Pasture 




The Covered Wagon 



119 



1 


/ 






HHHI^^I 




1- 




Jf- ^B^^^^^l 


^^^^^^^S^v^^ " 


^^K^^^^ 




[ 






•^R, 






^K 


1 




HHHj^nj 




i 



The Blacksmith Shop 




The Funeral Coach 
120 




The Steam Engine 




The Threshing Machine 



121 




The Wheat Cradle 




iS<\L^,ill?vf&;r^^5^4'>^'Csk^.■ wiu.'^.y'i^^'^ 



i\ ■ 'fK-A^f^i a:\ .iC' :tky^^ 



The Binder Reaper 



122 




The Grist Mill 




The Mill Dam 



123 




The Rail Fence 




The Wheat Field 
124 



\ ':j'^\ 




Timber 




Cutting 



125 




Logs 






Logging 




126 




The Saw Mill 



Lumber 




Construction 



127 




Photo by Ed Readling 



Our Hallmark of Freedom 



I have been young, and am now old; yet have I not seen the righteous 
forsaken, nor his seed begging bread. 

Psalm 38:25 



Always looking backward 

At happy times we knew, 

Always looking forward, 
To glad reunions too. 

Wishing peace and joy 

And happiness to you. 



128 




far 

c 





a; 

z 



u 


jj 


F— 


■Ji 


Vw' 




QJ 


'^ 


P 


<i 










._o 


S 


ID 


T^ 


^ 


E 


^ 


OJ 


c 


o 




C 




(U 



c 




c^ 


CJ 



< ^ 



^ 






22 !- iJ3 
= C 

CUM 






= e 

^ i- I — : OJ 

£ c ,, br 

-5- .^ 



<u o 






o " 



■^ zl ID 






1) <u 



129 




CM 



r; 


^ 




C 


. 










■^ 


r^ 




be 


rt 




V 


.^ 




bJD 


rt 
^ 










O 






;:: 


s 




C^ 


Q 




c 








c 




.4_1 


"H 
















J 


^ 




'Z 


o 




r^ 


C^ 




W 


CU 


s 


ffl 


O 




^ 


■" 


cu 


■^ 


fa/D 


z 


'S 


C 




Q 






c 
o 






c/5 


c 




























< 


-:::; 




^ 












rt 


,3 










s 






> 


> 




OJ 


a 




P^ 


X 



130 



INDEX-PART II 

BETHEL (BEAR CREEK) 
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST 



Albemarle. N. C.,16 
Allman, Rev. Lester, 14 
Allman. Rev. R. W., 14 
Almond, H. T., 15 
Asbiiry, Louis H., 16 

Earnhardt, Col. George, 10 

Earnhardt, ALatthias, 1 

Earnhardt. Sally, 10 

Ban-ier, Ray, 20 

Barrier, ^V. E., 23 

Eamnsrer, George, 11 

Earringer. John Sr., 11 

Baninger, John Jr., 11 

Earringer, Luther, 20 

Baninger, Matthias, 11 

Bear Creek Charge, 14 

Bear Creek Grange, 18 

Beaver, D. A., 14 

Berger, (Barrier) John, 11 

Bernard, Matthias, 11 

Bethel Bear Creek, 10, 11, 12, 14. 

16, 18, 19, 20, 25 
Bethel Bearer, 23 
Blackwelder, Mrs. Rueben,21 
Boger Church, 14, 20 
Boger, D. H., 14 
Boger, Rev. George, 1 
Boshard, Jacob, 11 

Bost, Mr. & Mrs. G. L. Qack). 
21, 22 

Bost, Jackie, 21,22 

Boys worth, J. H., 16 

Budget, 23 

Buffalo Creek, 1 



C^amp Earnhardt, 19 
Catawba College, 12, 17 
Cecil, Rev. J. ^V., 11 
Cemetery, 1, 23, 25 
Charleston Society, 1 
Charlotte, N. C, 16 
Churchmen's Brotherhood, 17 
Church of the Year, 23 
Civic Concern, 21 
Clapp, J. C, DD., 11, 12 
Classis of North Carolina, 9, 12, 

13, 15. 17 
Cline, Mi-s. M. L, 20 
Commimity Center, 18. 21 
Concord, N. C, 16 
Confederate Notes, 10 
Confirmation Class, 21 
Congregational Christian 

Church, 18 
Crooks, Rev. R. F.. 11 
Gulp, George, 11 
Gulp, John, 1 1 

Dolin, Henr)', 1 1 

East Rowan Charge, 14 
Elon College, 23 
Evana;elical & Reformed Church. 
17 

Family Names, 9 
Fesperman, D. B., 14 
Fisher. Mrs. Ralph, 19 
Fletcher, Supt. Yadkin RR, 16 
Foil, J. W., 14 
Furr, Johnny, 19 



131 



Gerner, Samuel, 11 
Gold Hill, N. C, 16 
Girls Missionary Guild, 17 
Grace Lower Stone, 14 
Guilford County, 17 

Harris, E. D., 11 
Harris, Ephriam, 11 
Hartsell, Anthony, 19 
Hartsell, Johnny, 19 
Hartsell, Sidney, 19 
Harvest Home, 15 
Harwood, A. J., 15, 22 
Heller, Rev. C. B., 12 
Fleynseman, William, 1 
Hiatt, Rev. Charlie, 22 
Holy Communion, 16 
Holshouser, Christenbury. 14 
Holshouser, J. R., 14 
Honeycutt, Gregory, 19 
Hurlocker, Bruner family, 19 
Hurlocker, Mrs. Charlie, 20 
Hurlocker, Meridith, 19 

Industry, 24 

Keasler, Kenneth, 19 
Kendall, Jack, 19 
Kendall, Tommy, 23 
Kepley, Peter,Sr., 11 
Kepley, Peter, Jr., 1 1 
Kluttz, George, 14 
Kluttz. J. G., 14 

Laus Deo, 1 

Lentz Adolphus Crooks, 15, 16, 22 
Lentz, Mrs. Holly, 19 

Lentz, M. G., 13, 15, 16 

Lentz, V. C, 19 

Lentz, Verna, 19, 20, 22 

Leofler, Christopher, 1 

Leonard, Dr. J. C, 17 



Loetter, Christopher Gottlieb, 1 
Lore, Miss Eugenia, 11 
Loretz, Rev., 1 
Lowder, Mrs. Ralph, 20 
Lyerly, Christopher, 1 
Lyerly, W. A., 13, 15 

Marbry, Phyllis, 21 
Meeting House, 1 
Meier, Rev. Henry J., 19 

Membership Roll 1974, 26, 27, 

28, 29 

Memorials, 25 

Military Service Records, 24, 25 

Missionary Sale, 12, 18 

Moody, W. A., 14 

Moose, A. Farrell, 22 

Moose, Dan, 10 

Moose, Daniel M. (Dan'l), 
11, 12, 13 

Moose, D. Monroe, 14 

Moose, Earl, 22 

Moose, Floyd B., 18, 22 

Moose, Mrs. Forrest, 19 

Moose, George H., 16, 18, 22 

Moose, Gerald, 19 

Moose, Jacob O. Sr., 10 

Moose, J. Forrest, 20, 22 

Moose, J. F., 12, 13, 14, 16 

Moose, Joe, 19 

Moose, John D., 12 

Moose, John Hugh, 13 

Moose, J. Wade, 15, 16, 22 

Moose, Lester, 21 

Moose, Ray, 20 

Moose, Willard, 19 

Mt. Hope Church, 17 

Mt. Pleasant, N. C, 13, 20, 21, 25 

Musgenung, Jacob, 11 



132 



Nazareih Children's Home, 17 
New Bethel Lutheran, 1 1 
Niblock, F. C, 16 
North Carolina Grange, 23 
Norwood, N. C, 16 

Palmer, D. W., 13 
Palmer, Rev. Jacob A., 14, 15 
Palmer, Malcolm, 15, 16 
Palmer Stone ^\'orks, 16 
PASTORS, see picture section 
Peck, Felix B., DD., 14 
Peck, J. A., 13, 15 
Peck, John L., 14 
Pee Dee Road, 11 
Peeler, George, 14 
Peeler, Solomon, 14 
Penninger, A. M., 15 
Penninger, Mrs. A. M., 20 
Penninger, Charles, 19 
Platte, Ralph, 19 
Preaching Mission, 23 
Preparatory Service, 15 
Presbyterian Meeting House, 1 1 

Reed Organ, 19 
Rock'ivell, Ursinus, 14 
Rowan Cotmty, 17 
Rowland, J. A., 15, 16, 20, 22 
Rowland, Mrs. John A., 21 
Rowe, W. W., DD., 13 

Salaries, 13 

Scout Troop 110, 18 



Seitz, Henry, I 

Shoe, Albert, 13 

Shue, W. R., 22 

Sides, Green, 16 

Sollinger, Mrs. Elma Holland, 20 

Sollinger, Merle, Jr., 20 

Sollinger, Rev. Merle, 20. 21 

Sollinger, Tommv, 20 

Sons of Congiegation, 14 

Southern Conference UCC, 23 

Southern Synod, 16 

Standard of Reformed Church, 
13, 16, 20 

Stanly County, 12 

St. James, Mt. Pleasant, 14. 20 

St. John's Lutheran, 1 

Sunday School, 12. 14. 15. 21 

Suther, Samuel, 1 

United Church of Christ, 18 

\'acation Bible School, 19 

Wagoner, Rev. C. C, 14, 15 
^Varlick, C. ^V., DD., 15, 16 
AVeaver, Isaam, 14 
AVelker, George Wm., DD., 9, 10 
W'eyberg, Rev. Samuel, 1 
\\^omen"s Guild, 20, 21 
AV^omen's Missionary Society, 17 
AV^onell, Leonard, 19 

Yadkin RR, 16 
"iouth Ministry, 18 



133 



INDEX 

LAUS DEO 30, 31 

PHOTOSTATIC COPIES of RELATED DOCUMENTS 32—46 

GRANT OF 100 ACRES OF LAND TO CHRISTOPHER 

LYERLY 32, 33 

DEED FOR 100 ACRES OF LAND TO CHURCH 34, 35 

DEED FOR 3 ACRES OF LAND TO CHURCH 36, 37, 38 

DEED FOR 2 ACRES OF LAND TO CHURCH 39, 40, 41 

TRUST SETTLEMENT BETWEEN LUTHERAN AND 

REFORMEDS 42, 43, 44, 45, 46 

CHURCH HYMN FROM OLD HYMNAL 47 



134 



INDEX 



PICTURE SECTION 



Allman. H. T. (family), 105 
Allman, Rev. Lester, 53 
Allman. Rev. R. ^V.. 53 
Apj^le Butter Kettle. 115 
Attendance A\vards. 107 
.\utomobile. 113 

Barnhardt, Col. George, 81 
Barnhardt, Matthias (home). 80 
Barrier, Horace (family), 100 
Barringer. Charlie and Marv, 74 
Barringer, Rev. Paul. 51 
Barringer, Titus (family), 106 
Barringer, \Vm. G. H. (family). 93 
Bear Creek School, 112 
Bicycle, 114 
Birthday Dinner, 113 
Black, Rev. Har\ey, 53 
Blacksmith Shop, 120 
Black^velder, George & -wife, 102 
Blackwelder, Noah & wife, 102 
Bost, Jackie &: parents, 109 
Boy Scouts 1974, 72 
Brodierhood 1950 - 1953, 67 
Butler, Rev. Thornton, 49 

Cemetery 1974, 63 
Cemetery Gate 1806, 54 
Cemetei"), Old Section, 64 
Chicken Lot, 114 
(Children's Ministry, 71 
Church built 1878, 57 
Church Remodeled 1906, 58 
Church 1974 (built 1928), 59 
Church Organ (first) , 84 
Clapp, Dr. J. C, 50 



Community Center, 65 
Congregation 1974. 60 
Congiegation 1974, 61 
Consti'uction. 127 
Ciovered ^\'agon, 119 
Cow Lot. 118 
Crooks, Re\. Robert F., 50 

Fisher. Cahin (family) , 104 
Fisher. Charlie (family) . 89 
Fisher. Luke, 104 
Foil, Dr. Moses A.. 50 
Funeral Coach, 120 

Gerhard. Rev. W. S.. 52 
Girls' Guild 1931. 66 
Granan. 115 
Grist Mill. 123 
Grist Mill Dam. 123 
Gurlev. Rev. G. D., 50 

Hallmark of Freedom, 128 
Harkey. Aunt Aggie. 108 
FLuness Shop,116 
Hartman, Annie Lee, 99 
Hartman. Clyde, 99 
Hartman. Julie, 98 
Hartman, Katherine, 98 
Hartman, Ralph, 99 
Hartman, Tom, 98 
Hay Mo-wer, 116 
Hedrick, Rev. Aubrey, 52 
Fleller, Rev. Calvin, 50 
Hiatt, Rev. Charles, 52 
Historical Marker, 54 
Hoffman. Rev. Thomas, 52 
Hog Killing, 115 



135 



Holste, Rev. Harold, 53 

Horse and Buggy, 114 

Horse Power, 118 

Hurlocker, Barry & Dora, 104 

Hurlocker, Crooks (family) , 101 

Hurlocker, Geo. |. (family) , 103 

Iron Fence, 55 

Lantz, Rev. John, 49 

Lentz, A. C. (family) , 87 

Lentz, Malcolm (family) , 85 

Lentz, Mary Anna (Moose) , 87 

Lentz, Verna, 108 

Lentz, V. C. and wife, 84 

Logs, 126 

Logging, 126 

Log Barn, 117 

Lyerly, David, 83 

Lyerly, Jane, 83 

Lyerly, Osborn (family) , 79 

Lyerly, Rev. \Vm. C, 52 

Lumber, 127 

McNairy, Rev. W. H., 51 
Meetinsr House 1806, 56 
Meier, Rev. Henry J., 53 
Mission Band 1941, 66 
Moody, Wm. Alexander & wife, 83 
Moose, Arthur Farrell (family), 78 
Moose, Catherine Amanda, 74 
Moose, Daniel "Dan'l" M., 74 
Moose, Geo. H. (family), 86 
Moose, Jason H. (family), 78 
Moose, John Fritch, 74 
Moose, John Fritch (family), 76 
Moose, John Hugh (daughters), 82 
Moose, John Hugh (sons), 82 
Moose, John Hugh & wife, 82 
Moose, J. Wade (family), 77 
Moose, Luther H. (family), 75 



Moose, M^illiam F. and grand- 
sons, 77 

Moose, Rufus and grand- 
children, 103 

Music Ministry, 69 

New Bethel Lutheran Congrega- 
tion, 129 

New Bethel Lutheran Congrega- 
tion, 130 

Palmer, Daniel & wife, 91 

Palmer, Rev. Jacob A., 53 

Palmer, Marcus (family), 91 

Palmer, Peggy, 90 

Palmer, Peggy with Lewis and 
Carl, 90 

Palmer, Wm. Alexander, 90 

Parsonage Bldg. Comm., 73 

Parsonage, 62 

Peck Academy, 110 

Peck, Addison & wife, 97 

Peck, Calvin (family), 85 

Peck, Rev. Felix B., 53 

Peck, J. Lawson & wife, 98 

Penninger, Albert (family), 95 

Penninger, Jonas (family), 95 

Penninger, Martin L. (family), 94 

Penninger, Mathias M., 93 

Quilting Party, 112 

Rail Fence, 124 

Reaper Binder, 122 

Reed, Martha, 81 

Rinehardt, T. M. & wife, 104 

Rowe, Rev. Walter W., 51 

Rowland, John A. (family), 83 

Rowland, Martha Ellen 
(Moose), 105 

Saw Mill, 127 
Sheep Pasture, 119 



i36 



Shue, Albert & wife, 97 

Shue, Issac, Alex (Sandv). 
John, 96 

Shue, Will (family), 100 

Shulenberger, Rev. A., 51 

Sides, Green (family), 88 

Sollinger, Kev. Merle F., 52 

Spirit of 1776, 54 

Stanley, Rev. Border L., 51 

Steam Engine, 121 

Timber, 125 
Timber Cutting, 125 
To Chtn-ch, 113 
Tosh, Rev. Aaron R., 52 



Troutman, John. Simeon and 
sisters, 92 

Threshing Machine, 121 

Trexler, Rev. Peter M., 50 

^\^a2:oner, Rev. Columbus C, 53 

\Varlick, Rev. Charles \V., 52 

Watermelons, 127 

Well House, 115 

\nieat Cradle. 122 

^Vheat Field, 124 

^Vhitley, Clarence H., Sr., 99 

Whitley, Katherine Hartman, 99 

Women's Fellowship, 68 

W'illiams, Rev. E. Carver, 51 

Youth Ministrv, 70 



137 



138